Recent Water Damage Posts

Pipe Burst Problems and Prevention

12/22/2022 (Permalink)

Pipe Burst Flood in School Pipe burst in Peace School

With winter finally here, and the snow and cold due to come, the most optimal time for pipe bursts comes along with it. The cold winter months are responsible for thousands of pipe bursts yearly, with the potential of more than 5,000 dollars in damage as a result. We at SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo know this situation too well, as it is responsible for many of the floods we see during the winter months. These situations usually arise when pipes are not insulated well enough and when the temperature gets very low, causing the water inside to freeze. When water freezes, it expands, increasing the pressure in the pipe and causing it to burst, letting out freezing cold water and damaging all surrounding structures. An example of this is shown in the attached image, where a pipe burst in a classroom, flooding and damaging the room and its contents. With this happening so often, we at SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo have some important safety tips that can help prevent a disaster like this from occurring.

  • First off, make sure your pipes are insulated, as without insulation, the pipes are very likely to freeze. One dollar a foot for insulation is way better than 5,000 dollars in damage.
  • Secondly, keep your home heated and at a constant temperature, preferably at least 55°F, to help prevent pipes from freezing. While you may be paying more for your heating bill. It definitely beats the cost of cleaning up the mess from a burst pipe.
  • Lastly, if needed, leave a sink slow dripping to allow water movement in the pipes. This helps prevent water from freezing as moving water has connecting energy, which is transferred into heat energy from friction in the pipe.

Overall, with the wave of cold months arriving, make sure to stay safe and warm, and while you're at it,  keep those pipes warm too. If all else fails, a hairdryer on the pipes may do the trick. In the event that a pipe does burst, make sure to give us a call at (586)336-7373. We at SERVPRO are available 24/7 and faster to any-size disaster. We will make your cold crisis seem “Like it never even happened.”

Keeping an Eye Out for Frozen Pipes

11/4/2022 (Permalink)

Water has a unique property in it that expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the strength of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break.

Pipes that freeze most frequently are:

  • Pipes that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, and water sprinkler lines.
  • Water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets.
  • Pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation.

Protecting Pipes from Freezing

Before the onset of cold weather, protect your pipes from freezing by following these recommendations:

  • Drain water from the swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.
  • Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.
  • Add insulation to attics, basements and crawl spaces. Insulation will maintain higher temperatures in these areas.
  • Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located in unheated areas. Look in the garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.
  • Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Newspaper can provide some degree of insulation and protection to exposed pipes – even ¼” of newspaper can provide significant protection in areas that usually do not have frequent or prolonged temperatures below freezing.
  • Consider relocating exposed pipes to provide increased protection from freezing.

Preventing Frozen Pipes

  • Keep garage doors closed if there are water supply lines in the garage.
  • Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.
  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing.
  • Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.
  • If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.

Thawing Frozen Pipes

  • If you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Likely places for frozen pipes include against exterior walls or where your water service enters your home through the foundation.
  • Keep the faucet open. As you treat the frozen pipe and the frozen area begins to melt, water will begin to flow through the frozen area. Running water through the pipe will help melt ice in the pipe.
  • Apply heat to the section of pipe using an electric heating pad wrapped around the pipe, an electric hair dryer, a portable space heater (kept away from flammable materials), or by wrapping pipes with towels soaked in hot water. Do not use a blowtorch, kerosene or propane heater, charcoal stove, or other open flame device.
  • Apply heat until full water pressure is restored. If you are unable to locate the frozen area, if the frozen area is not accessible, or if you cannot thaw the pipe, call a licensed plumber.
  • Check all other faucets in your home to find out if you have additional frozen pipes. If one pipe freezes, others may freeze, too.

Water Mitigation, and what it means

3/3/2022 (Permalink)

What does water mitigation mean?

Water mitigation refers to the process of properly cleaning, sanitizing, drying, repairing, and restoring a property to its pre-water damage condition. Every property and water damage situation is unique, requiring an individualized plan of action to complete the mitigation process.

Identify Source The first step to fixing water damage in your home is to identify the source of the water. In some cases, like broken plumbing or natural disaster, the source will be easily identifiable. However, in other cases the cause may be difficult to identify if it is behind a wall or ceiling. Once the source of water is identified you will need to take steps to remedy the problem and seal the leak.

Fixing plumbing, sealing fixture casing, or altering landscaping water flow channels may be all you need to remedy the situation. However, in some cases you will need a professional to identify and repair the source of unwanted water flow.

Clean Standing Water

The next step you need to take to fix water damage in your home is to clean any standing water. In most water damage situations there are pools of water in low lying areas. In some cases you can use a common wet/dry vacuum to remove water, mud, or other debris from flooding. However more severe flooding cases require industrial water extractors to handle the volume and density of polluted water.

Dehumidify After standing water has been removed you will need to dehumidify the remaining moisture. This is one of the most important steps you need to take to fix water damage in your home or office. Residual moisture can cause warping and other property damage as well as lead to serious health issues like the formation of mold, bacteria, and other contaminants. Dehumidification removes hidden moisture to eliminate the possibility of further damage occurring once the primary water has been removed.

Clean and Sanitize

after the water and moisture have been removed the next step to fix water damage is to clean and sanitize the impacted areas. Flood water often brings sewage and other pollutants with it. These contaminants must be removed before final repairs are conducted. Commercial cleaners and industrial sanitizers will ensure that your property is effectively cleaned and treated.

Repair and Restore

The final step in fixing water damage is repair and restoration. Any flooring or carpeting that was damaged must be cleaned or replaced. Damaged walls may need to have sections replaced or repainted.

 SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo can help with all of your water damage needs.

Call us today: 586-336-7373

Helpful hints for a Flooded Bathroom

2/25/2022 (Permalink)

Flooded bathroom? Here Are Some Helpful Tips.

 Clogged toilets can happen in the best-kept homes. Busy families can forget someone’s filling up the tub. A pipe can freeze during the night and burst before you’re awake. From faulty plumbing to a sewage backup, it doesn’t take much to flood the bathroom.

Before you grab a mop, ask yourself a quick question: Do you know the best way to take care of a flooded bathroom and keep water damage to a minimum?

SERVPRO Marine City /Romeo 586-336-7373 we know how to tackle this kind of work. It’s a big job, and you need to take it one step at a time. It’s our goal to help make your next bathroom cleanup project a little easier.

You want to address bathroom flooding as quickly as you can. Standing water soaks subflooring, wicks into sheetrock and creates a perfect breeding environment for unhealthy mold and mildew.

These 10 steps get you on the road to flooded bathroom recovery.

  1. TURN OFF THE WATER: Locate the sink or toilet valve so that you can shut off the water supply and stop the flooding. The oval-shaped knobs are usually under the sink and behind the toilet.

Helpful Tip: If you’re dealing with a burst pipe, turn off your home’s water supply at the outside main.

  1. FIX THE PROBLEM: Determine the exact source of the flood water, and clear the clog, or fix the leak. We recommend calling SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373
  2. 3. DOCUMENT THE DAMAGE: Even minor bathroom flooding can turn into serious water damage, so take pictures before you start cleaning. Save them as documentation in case you need to file an insurance claim.
  3. CLEAN OUT CABINETS: Get everything out of vanity cabinets and any other storage in contact with the wet floor. Check these areas for damage, and determine what kind of cleanup they need.

Helpful Tip: Leave cabinet doors and drawers open to help circulate air and speed up the drying process.

  1. REMOVE STANDING WATER: Tackle minor floods on tile or vinyl floors with old towels, and finish up with a good mopping. Lay newspapers flat inside cabinets to absorb excess moisture in hard-to-reach spaces. If the flooding is severe, please call SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.
  2. USE A WET VACUUM: If you’re dealing with several inches of flooding or a carpeted bathroom floor, extract the water with a wet vacuum. Be sure to follow the equipment’s instruction manual for safe use.
  3. 7. PULL OFF BASEBOARDS: Carefully pry baseboards away from walls so that you can check sheetrock at floor level. The porous material can quickly soak up flood water, and you need to

Helpful Tip: leave the baseboards off until you’ve finished cleaning the bathroom.

  1. START THE DRYING PROCESS: Set up as many fans as possible, and arrange them so that their air circulation creates crosscurrents. Consider renting a large dehumidifier to speed up the drying process.{ Dehumidifiers remove access moisture}
  2. REMOVE DAMAGED SHEETROCK: Soaked sheetrock is a perfect breeding ground for mold, so don’t try to salvage it. Tear out and replace any wallboard that doesn’t dry within three days.
  3. SCRUB AND DISINFECT: Clean floors, cabinets and any other surfaces affected by bathroom flood waters. Finish off the job with a disinfectant designed to prevent mold growth.

YOU CAN’T ALWAYS DO IT YOURSELF:

If you have experienced any of the above, please don’t hesitate to call SERVPRO marine city/ romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.

Floods and Storms

2/25/2022 (Permalink)

Floods/Storms

Floods

Failing to evacuate flooded areas, entering flood waters, or remaining after a flood has passed can result in injury or death. Flooding is a temporary overflow of water onto land that is normally dry. Floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States. Floods may:

  • Result from rain, snow, coastal storms, storm surges, and overflows of dams and other water systems.
  • Develop slowly or quickly – Flash floods can come with no warning.
  • Cause outages, disrupt transportation, damage buildings, and create landslides.

 IF YOU ARE UNDER A FLOOD WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown!
    • Just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.
  • Determine how best to protect yourself based on the type of flooding.
    • Evacuate if told to do so.
    • Move to higher ground or a higher floor.
    • Stay where you are.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A FLOOD THREATENS

WHAT TO DO NOW: Prepare

  • Know types of flood risk in your area. 
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • If flash flooding is a risk in your location, then monitor potential signs, such as heavy rain.
  • Learn and practice evacuation routes, shelter plans, and flash flood response.
  • Gather supplies in case you have to leave immediately, or if services are cut off. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets. Obtain extra batteries and charging devices for phones and other critical equipment.
  • Purchase or renew a flood insurance policy. It typically takes up to 30 days for a policy to go into effect and can protect the life you've built. Homeowner’s policies do not cover flooding. Get flood coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)
  • Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies.
  • Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.

WHAT TO DO DURING: Survive

  • Depending on where you are, and the impact and the warning time of flooding, go to the safe location that you previously identified.
  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown!
  • Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.
  • If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, then stay inside. If water is rising inside the vehicle, then seek refuge on the roof.
  • If trapped in a building, then go to its highest level. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising floodwater. Go on the roof only if necessary. Once there, signal for help.

WHAT TO DO AFTER: Be Safe

  • Listen to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
  • Avoid driving, except in emergencies.
  • Snakes and other animals may be in your house. Wear heavy gloves and boots during clean up.
  • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows.

Flood Damage v Water Damage

2/1/2022 (Permalink)

Flood Damage –V- Water Damage What’s the difference?

Water Damage as covered in the homeowners policy includes “instances of water hitting your home before (No, we’re not making this up.) Damage from a leaky roof or broken pipe are insured. So too is mold that results from those accidents. Touching the outside ground”

But mold resulting from a flood won’t be covered unless you have separate flood insurance.

It’s important to note that it is the damage to your home that’s insured, not the actual item that failed. So if a busted pipe was the source of the problem, the ruined carpet will be covered but not the broken pipe.

We are always here to help in such instances. SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo provides 24 hour support for all your Water Loss needs. You can contact us at 586-336-7373.

What to do before help arrives

2/1/2022 (Permalink)

What to do before help arrives.

If you have a water damage from a clean source such as water supply lines, sink overflows, tub overflows, or appliance malfunctions, here are some things to do before SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo arrives.

  • Shut off the source of the water.
  • Turn off circuit breakers for wet areas of the building if the access panel is safe from electrical shock.
  • Remove as much excess water as possible by mopping and blotting
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removing lamps and tabletop items
  • Remove and prop up wet upholstery cushions for even drying
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting
  • Remove to a safe, dry place any paintings, art objects, computers, documents and other materials that are valuable or sensitive to moisture.
  • Use wooden clothespins to keep furniture skirting off damp floors
  • Hang draperies with coated hangers to avoid contact with wet carpeting or floors

SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo provides 24-hour emergency service and is dedicated to being faster to any size disaster. Our highly trained technicians can respond immediately to your residential or commercial emergency. CALL TODAY: 586-336-7373

Three Types of Contaminated Water

12/1/2021 (Permalink)

Category 1: "Clean Water"

Category 1 water is from a clean source like a broken water supply line or leaking faucet. If not treated quickly, this water can turn into category 2 or 3, depending on length of time, temperature, and contact with surrounding contaminants.

  • Water from a clean source like a broken water line
  • If left untreated, can degrade into category 2 or 3

Category 2: "Gray Water"                

Category 2 water is contaminated and could cause discomfort or illness. Examples include washing machine overflow; toilet overflow with some urine, but no feces; or dishwasher overflow.

  • May contain bacteria and viruses
  • Can quickly degrade into category 3 if left untreated

Category 3: "Black Water"

Category 3 water is grossly contaminated and could cause severe illness or death if ingested and any contact should be avoided. Examples include flooding from rivers or streams, water from beyond the toilet trap, water from the toilet bowl with feces, or standing water that has begun to support microbial growth.

  • May contain untreated sewage, harsh chemicals, and microbes
  • Water from flooding rivers or sewer backup

FROZEN PIPES

11/30/2021 (Permalink)

Why Pipe Freezing is a Problem

Water has a unique property in it that expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the strength of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break.

Pipes that freeze most frequently are:

  • Pipes that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, and water sprinkler lines.
  • Water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets.
  • Pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation.

How to Protect Pipes from Freezing

Before the onset of cold weather, protect your pipes from freezing by following these recommendations:

  • Drain water from swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.
  • Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.
  • Add insulation to attics, basements and crawl spaces. Insulation will maintain higher temperatures in these areas.
  • Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located in unheated areas. Look in the garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.
  • Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Newspaper can provide some degree of insulation and protection to exposed pipes – even ¼” of newspaper can provide significant protection in areas that usually do not have frequent or prolonged temperatures below freezing.
  • Consider relocating exposed pipes to provide increased protection from freezing.

How to Prevent Frozen Pipes

  • Keep garage doors closed if there are water supply lines in the garage.
  • Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.
  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing.
  • Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.
  • If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.

How to Thaw Frozen Pipes

  • If you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Likely places for frozen pipes include against exterior walls or where your water service enters your home through the foundation.
  • Keep the faucet open. As you treat the frozen pipe and the frozen area begins to melt, water will begin to flow through the frozen area. Running water through the pipe will help melt ice in the pipe.
  • Apply heat to the section of pipe using an electric heating pad wrapped around the pipe, an electric hair dryer, a portable space heater (kept away from flammable materials), or by wrapping pipes with towels soaked in hot water. Do not use a blowtorch, kerosene or propane heater, charcoal stove, or other open flame device.
  • Apply heat until full water pressure is restored. If you are unable to locate the frozen area, if the frozen area is not accessible, or if you cannot thaw the pipe, call a licensed plumber.
  • Check all other faucets in your home to find out if you have additional frozen pipes. If one pipe freezes, others may freeze, too.

Dealing with water damage

9/2/2021 (Permalink)

Marine City homeowners know that water damage can be especially troublesome. Water flows in almost every direction, and can even seep uphill when there is an absorbent material that facilitates this movement. Where water can flow to, damage can be found.

When water makes contact with metal, rusting can start taking place. Outlets, being near the floor, are often impacted this way by flooding. If the metal is part of an electrical system, this can lead to problems with electrical shock or even fire. Both can be deadly and need to be prevented by replacing anything affected. Other metal items in your home might be door hinges, screen doors, drawer tracks, cabinetry knobs and handles, and much more.

In situations where water has seeped into a home from a leaky roof or other reason, water can discolor walls and ceilings, and cause plaster to crumble and pose choking hazards to younger children and toddlers. Pests that may have been present but largely unnoticed within the walls or attic can find their way into your living space. While their presence means they are no longer hidden and can now be dealt with, having them around your family is not healthy.

Carpeting, upholstery and longer drapes can also become damaged. Affected textiles become weak and brittle. High levels of humidity can bring this on, and often the culprit is an absence of a dehumidifier. Other ways that increased humidity might happen are poor or incorrect venting of the clothes dryer or the bathroom fan.

The first step to mitigating any amount of damage is discovering the source of the excess water. Flooding does not need to be present for a home to have water damage. Contact your local experts who can assist you every step of the way. SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is available 24/7 at (586) 336-7373.

Homeowners dealing with water damage

9/2/2021 (Permalink)

Have you ever experienced water damage in your home or business? If so, you know that there are hundreds of companies out there advertising water damage restoration services. So what differentiates SERVPRO from all the rest? 

Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. With a nationwide system of qualified franchises, no damage is too large or too small for SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo.

We pride ourselves on our knowledge, experience and continued education. So what does it mean to be IICRC certified? Who is the IICRC? The IICRC is a nonprofit certification and Standards Developing Organization (SDO) for the inspection, cleaning and restoration industries. The IICRC is recognized internationally as a knowledgeable industry voice and resource. The IICRC has led the way in establishing the main industry standards and reference guides for professional carpet cleaning, upholstery and fabric cleaning, water damage restoration and mold remediation. Each IICRC standard takes years to develop along with the coordination of experts in the field.

If you or someone you know experiences water damage in their home or business now you know who you can call. SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is here to help 24/7. We can be reached at (586) 336-7373.

Flooding Tips

9/1/2021 (Permalink)

WATER DAMAGE TIPS

What you can do until help arrives

After any water damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

With over 1,650 Franchises nationwide, there’s a SERVPRO Professional nearby and ready to serve you.

What To Do After Flooding

  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
  • Gather loose items from floors.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
  • Don't use television or other household appliances.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

Leaks in your foundation

8/3/2021 (Permalink)

Why a Leak in a Foundation Must be Repaired Promptly

Foundation leaks usually happen due to pressure in the soil outside that is caused by water. When soil around the foundation becomes saturated, it swells and pushes inward on the structure.  This causes cracks in poured concrete walls and in the mortar joints of masonry walls and the water is the forced in through these cracks. Water pressure under the basement floor can also cause cracks that leak. Sometimes, foundation leaks occur without cracks, such as when hydrostatic pressure below the foundation forces water into the basement through the cove joint, a tiny aperture created when foundation walls are poured or built. Of course, leaks in a foundation can vary in severity from a tiny seepage to a flooded floor but one thing is true of any of them – left unrepaired, they spell trouble. 

Here are some reasons why foundation leaks shouldn’t be ignored:

Increased Humidity – The presence of water in the basement, even a small amount, increases humidity, in both the basement and in the living space above.  Not only does this create an uncomfortable atmosphere within the home but it forces HVAC systems to work harder and longer, especially air-conditioning, to remove the humidity from the air.  The result?  Big electric bills.

Mold – Mold spores are so common that they exist in many places, including basements, where they can lay dormant for long periods of time.  Mold requires three things to thrive and two of them, warmth and food, are present in just about every basement. (Food can be anything organic – wood, drywall, cardboard boxes, etc.) Add water from a leak in the foundation and mold spores will spring to life, causing damage to surfaces on which they grow and creating a hazardous atmosphere as they are drawn upwards into the home, ether by HVAC systems or the “stack effect” that moves air upward inside a structure.

Airborne mold spores can cause or exacerbate respiratory conditions among the home’s residents.

Worsening Damage – Leaks in foundations, unfortunately, don’t heal.  Left unrepaired, they can only get worse and allow more water to enter the basement.  In concrete block foundations, for example, water that enters through cracks in mortar joints often finds its way to the cavities in the blocks themselves, filling them up and allowing water to actually seep through the relatively porous block walls over time.

Flooded Bathrooms

8/3/2021 (Permalink)

Flooded bathroom? Here Are Some Helpful Tips.

 Clogged toilets can happen in the best-kept homes. Busy families can forget someone’s filling up the tub. A pipe can freeze during the night and burst before you’re awake. From faulty plumbing to a sewage backup, it doesn’t take much to flood the bathroom.

Before you grab a mop, ask yourself a quick question: Do you know the best way to take care of a flooded bathroom and keep water damage to a minimum?

SERVPRO Marine City /Romeo 586-336-7373 we know how to tackle this kind of work. It’s a big job, and you need to take it one step at a time. It’s our goal to help make your next bathroom cleanup project a little easier.

You want to address bathroom flooding as quickly as you can. Standing water soaks subflooring, wicks into sheetrock and creates a perfect breeding environment for unhealthy mold and mildew.

These 10 steps get you on the road to flooded bathroom recovery.

  1. TURN OFF THE WATER: Locate the sink or toilet valve so that you can shut off the water supply and stop the flooding. The oval-shaped knobs are usually under the sink and behind the toilet.

Helpful Tip: If you’re dealing with a burst pipe, turn off your home’s water supply at the outside main.

  1. FIX THE PROBLEM: Determine the exact source of the flood water, and clear the clog, or fix the leak. We recommend calling SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373
  2. 3. DOCUMENT THE DAMAGE: Even minor bathroom flooding can turn into serious water damage, so take pictures before you start cleaning. Save them as documentation in case you need to file an insurance claim.
  3. CLEAN OUT CABINETS: Get everything out of vanity cabinets and any other storage in contact with the wet floor. Check these areas for damage, and determine what kind of cleanup they need.

Helpful Tip: Leave cabinet doors and drawers open to help circulate air and speed up the drying process.

  1. REMOVE STANDING WATER: Tackle minor floods on tile or vinyl floors with old towels, and finish up with a good mopping. Lay newspapers flat inside cabinets to absorb excess moisture in hard-to-reach spaces. If the flooding is severe, please call SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.
  2. USE A WET VACUUM: If you’re dealing with several inches of flooding or a carpeted bathroom floor, extract the water with a wet vacuum. Be sure to follow the equipment’s instruction manual for safe use.
  3. 7. PULL OFF BASEBOARDS: Carefully pry baseboards away from walls so that you can check sheetrock at floor level. The porous material can quickly soak up flood water, and you need to

Helpful Tip: leave the baseboards off until you’ve finished cleaning the bathroom.

  1. START THE DRYING PROCESS: Set up as many fans as possible, and arrange them so that their air circulation creates crosscurrents. Consider renting a large dehumidifier to speed up the drying process.{ Dehumidifiers remove access moisture}
  2. REMOVE DAMAGED SHEETROCK: Soaked sheetrock is a perfect breeding ground for mold, so don’t try to salvage it. Tear out and replace any wallboard that doesn’t dry within three days.
  3. SCRUB AND DISINFECT: Clean floors, cabinets and any other surfaces affected by bathroom flood waters. Finish off the job with a disinfectant designed to prevent mold growth.

YOU CAN’T ALWAYS DO IT YOURSELF:

If you have experienced any of the above, please don’t hesitate to call SERVPRO marine city/ romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.

Water Restoration

8/2/2021 (Permalink)

Water Restoration Professional Products

When contamination exists, SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo uses professional water damage restoration products to return the loss environment to a preloss condition. Competence in this area requires an awareness of the basic types of products, understanding proper product usage, and how to explain these products to customers and/or clients.

General Chemical Terminology:

  1. Antimicrobial. The word antimicrobial means literally “against microbes.” An antimicrobial agent is any chemical used “against” microorganisms to prevent their development or to limit or stop their growth (examples would be fungistats and mildewstats). The word antimicrobial can sometimes refer more generally to various chemicals registered as disinfectants, germicides, fungicides, virucides, sporicides, mildewcides, or sanitizers. 
  2. Disinfectants. Disinfectants and germicides are antimicrobials that destroy about 99 percent of organisms they contact on surfaces where applied. They may or may not affect bacterial or fungal spores, which are usually dormant, reproductive bodies. 
  3. Sanitizers. Sanitizers are used to decrease the number of microbials to acceptable levels. A product listed as a sanitizer reduces microbes to levels considered by public health authorities to be safe. Under the right conditions, however, the microbes may grow back.
  4. Sterilizers. A sterilizer destroys all microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi spores. Sterilizing microbes in a water damage is generally not possible. Sterilizers can only be used on inanimate surfaces that can withstand the chemicals. Chlorine products are used as sterilizing agents.
  5. Mildewstats and fungistats (known as “stats”) slow the growth of fungi on organic materials such as textiles, leather, and paper. They do not necessarily kill microbes, but prevent their further growth when used according to label directions. 
  6. Biocides are chemical agents that destroy or kill living organisms (-cide meaning “kill”). For example, a “virucide” would kill or inactivate viruses. In the restoration industry, however, the term biocide is used generally to refer to any chemical agent that affects the growth of microbes like bacteria and fungi. Because of the general use of the term biocide, any particular product called a biocide may not actually “kill” microbes. 
  7. Sporicides. A disinfectant that is effective in controlling bacterial or fungal spores when used according to label

Water Damage

8/2/2021 (Permalink)

WATER DAMAGE EMERGENCY TIPS

What you can do until help arrives

After any water damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

With over 1,650 Franchises nationwide, there’s a SERVPRO Professional nearby and ready to serve you.

What To Do After Flooding

  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
  • Gather loose items from floors.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
  • Don't use television or other household appliances.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

Your Belongings and Water Damage part 1

7/19/2021 (Permalink)

Water damage affects not only the structure of your house but also your belongings. SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo Professionals understand that your home is more than a structure; your family’s furniture, clothing, keepsakes, and other belongings help transform a house into a home.

Do You Need Our Help? Call Us Today 586-336-7373

Contents Restoration

SERVPRO Franchise Professionals specialize in restoring contents damaged by fire, water, or mold. Their expertise and “restore” versus “replace” mentality can help you save money while preserving precious keepsakes that can’t be replaced. They pretest your contents to determine what items can be restored back to their condition before the water damage. SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo Professionals utilize several methods of cleaning your contents, including:

  • Dry Cleaning - Used for cleaning light residues or to pre-clean prior to wet cleaning.
  • Wet Cleaning - An effective cleaning method for removing moderate to heavy residues.
  • Spray and Wipe -Effective for items that can’t withstand wet cleaning.
  • Foam Cleaning - Used for upholstery fabrics that might shrink or bleed if wet cleaned.
  • Abrasive Cleaning - Involves agitation of the surface being cleaned. 
  • Immersion Cleaning - Contents are dipped into a bath of the cleaning product. 

Your Belongings and Water Damage part 2

7/19/2021 (Permalink)

Move-Outs/Pack-Outs

If your home requires extensive restoration or cleaning, SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo Franchise Professionals can conduct an organized, efficient move-out of the affected area. Move-out will provide several benefits, including:

  • A quicker remodeling process
  • Protecting items from potential damage
  • Protecting contents from further on-site damage

When restoration is completed, they will work with you to coordinate the move-in according to your needs. The services offered upon move-in may depend on your insurance coverage.

Your belongings and water damage part 3

7/19/2021 (Permalink)

Electronic Cleanup

Water-damaged electronics can present a serious hazard. Do not attempt to turn on or operate any electrical device that you suspect has been damaged by water. A SERVPRO Franchise Professional will coordinate the restoration of your electronics, including:

  • Television sets
  • DVD players
  • Computers
  • And more

The key to restoring electronics is taking prompt action to prevent further damage. They start by cleaning the exterior of electronic devices to help stop further corrosion and damage. Electronics will be cleaned and inspected by a qualified electronics technician.

Document and Photography Drying: When your valuable documents, including photographs, are damaged by water, extreme caution should be taken to help ensure the water damage does not destroy the document. Although some documents may not be restored to pre-water damage condition, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals can save a great deal and help minimize additional damage.

Depending on the type of documents and the level of water damage, we have five options for the restoration of documents:

  1. Air Drying
  2. Dehumidification
  3. Freezer Drying
  4. Vacuum Freeze Drying
  5. Vacuum Thermal Drying
  6. Contents Claim Inventory Service

When a fire emergency strikes, the damage can often feel overwhelming. SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo Professionals can help ease the worry and confusion during the recovery process by offering our Contents Claim Inventory Service (CCIS), which provides a detailed and accurate list of your belongings. They take a room-by-room inventory of your contents, including digital photos, and in some instances, bar coding. 

Our Contents Claim Inventory Service:

  • Preloss list and value of contents
  • Detailed and accurate report
  • Better information to settle claims quicker
  • Assistance with burden of proof for claims
  • Peace of mind when you need it most!

What does water mitigation mean?

5/20/2021 (Permalink)

Water mitigation refers to the process of properly cleaning, sanitizing, drying, repairing, and restoring a property to its pre-water damage condition. ... Every property and water damage situation is unique, requiring an individualized plan of action to complete the mitigation process.

 Identify Source

The first step to fixing water damage in your home is to identify the source of the water. In some cases, like broken plumbing or natural disaster, the source will be easily identifiable. However, in other cases the cause may be difficult to identify if it is behind a wall or ceiling. Once the source of water is identified you will need to take steps to remedy the problem and seal the leak.

Fixing plumbing, sealing fixture casing, or altering landscaping water flow channels may be all you need to remedy the situation. However, in some cases you will need a professional to identify and repair the source of unwanted water flow.


  1. Clean Standing Water

The next step you need to take to fix water damage in your home is to clean any standing water. In most water damage situations there are pools of water in low lying areas. In some cases you can use a common wet/dry vacuum to remove water, mud, or other debris from flooding. However more severe flooding cases require industrial water extractors to handle the volume and density of polluted water.

  1. Dehumidify

After standing water has been removed you will need to dehumidify the remaining moisture. This is one of the most important steps you need to take to fix water damage in your home or office. Residual moisture can cause warping and other property damage as well as lead to serious health issues like the formation of mold, bacteria, and other contaminants.

Dehumidification removes hidden moisture to eliminate the possibility of further damage occurring once the primary water has been removed.

  1. Clean and Sanitize
    after the water and moisture have been removed the next step to fix water damage is to clean and sanitize the impacted areas. Flood water often brings sewage and other pollutants with it. These contaminants must be removed before final repairs are conducted. Commercial cleaners and industrial sanitizers will ensure that your property is effectively cleaned and treated.
  2. Repair and Restore

The final step in fixing water damage is repair and restoration. Any flooring or carpeting that was damaged must be cleaned or replaced. Damaged walls may need to have sections replaced or repainted.

Flooded Bathroom

5/19/2021 (Permalink)

Flooded bathroom? Here Are Some Helpful Tips.

 Clogged toilets can happen in the best-kept homes. Busy families can forget someone’s filling up the tub. A pipe can freeze during the night and burst before you’re awake. From faulty plumbing to a sewage backup, it doesn’t take much to flood the bathroom.

Before you grab a mop, ask yourself a quick question: Do you know the best way to take care of a flooded bathroom and keep water damage to a minimum?

SERVPRO Marine City /Romeo 586-336-7373 we know how to tackle this kind of work. It’s a big job, and you need to take it one step at a time. It’s our goal to help make your next bathroom cleanup project a little easier.

You want to address bathroom flooding as quickly as you can. Standing water soaks subflooring, wicks into sheetrock and creates a perfect breeding environment for mold and mildew.

These 10 steps get you on the road to flooded bathroom recovery.

  1. TURN OFF THE WATER: Locate the sink or toilet valve so that you can shut off the water supply and stop the flooding. The oval-shaped knobs are usually under the sink and behind the toilet.

Helpful Tip: If you’re dealing with a burst pipe, turn off your home’s water supply at the outside main.

  1. FIX THE PROBLEM: Determine the exact source of the flood water, and clear the clog, or fix the leak. We recommend calling SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373
  2. 3. DOCUMENT THE DAMAGE: Even minor bathroom flooding can turn into serious water damage, so take pictures before you start cleaning. Save them as documentation in case you need to file an insurance claim.
  3. CLEAN OUT CABINETS: Get everything out of vanity cabinets and any other storage in contact with the wet floor. Check these areas for damage, and determine what kind of cleanup they need.

Helpful Tip: Leave cabinet doors and drawers open to help circulate air and speed up the drying process.

  1. REMOVE STANDING WATER: Tackle minor floods on tile or vinyl floors with old towels, and finish up with a good mopping. Lay newspapers flat inside cabinets to absorb excess moisture in hard-to-reach spaces. If the flooding is severe, please call SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.
  2. USE A WET VACUUM: If you’re dealing with several inches of flooding or a carpeted bathroom floor, extract the water with a wet vacuum. Be sure to follow the equipment’s instruction manual for safe use.
  3. 7. PULL OFF BASEBOARDS: Carefully pry baseboards away from walls so that you can check sheetrock at floor level. The porous material can quickly soak up flood water, and you need to

Helpful Tip: leave the baseboards off until you’ve finished cleaning the bathroom.

  1. START THE DRYING PROCESS: Set up as many fans as possible, and arrange them so that their air circulation creates crosscurrents. Consider renting a large dehumidifier to speed up the drying process.{ Dehumidifiers remove access moisture}
  2. REMOVE DAMAGED SHEETROCK: Soaked sheetrock is a perfect breeding ground for mold, so don’t try to salvage it. Tear out and replace any wallboard that doesn’t dry within three days.
  3. SCRUB AND DISINFECT: Clean floors, cabinets and any other surfaces affected by bathroom flood waters. Finish off the job with a disinfectant designed to prevent mold growth.

YOU CAN’T ALWAYS DO IT YOURSELF:

If you have experienced any of the above, please don’t hesitate to call SERVPRO marine city/ romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.

Water Damage Tips

5/19/2021 (Permalink)

WATER DAMAGE EMERGENCY TIPS

What you can do until help arrives

After any water damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

With over 1,650 Franchises nationwide, there’s a SERVPRO Professional nearby and ready to serve you.

What To Do After Flooding

  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
  • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
  • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
  • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
  • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
  • Gather loose items from floors.

What NOT To Do After Flooding

  • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
  • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
  • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
  • Don't use television or other household appliances.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

Flooded Bathroom?

3/10/2021 (Permalink)

Flooded bathroom? Here Are Some Helpful Tips.

 Clogged toilets can happen in the best-kept homes. Busy families can forget someone’s filling up the tub. A pipe can freeze during the night and burst before you’re awake. From faulty plumbing to a sewage backup, it doesn’t take much to flood the bathroom.

Before you grab a mop, ask yourself a quick question: Do you know the best way to take care of a flooded bathroom and keep water damage to a minimum?

SERVPRO Marine City /Romeo 586-336-7373 we know how to tackle this kind of work. It’s a big job, and you need to take it one step at a time. It’s our goal to help make your next bathroom cleanup project a little easier.

You want to address bathroom flooding as quickly as you can. Standing water soaks subflooring, wicks into sheetrock and creates a perfect breeding environment for mold and mildew.

These 10 steps get you on the road to flooded bathroom recovery.

  1. TURN OFF THE WATER: Locate the sink or toilet valve so that you can shut off the water supply and stop the flooding. The oval-shaped knobs are usually under the sink and behind the toilet.

Helpful Tip: If you’re dealing with a burst pipe, turn off your home’s water supply at the outside main.

  1. FIX THE PROBLEM: Determine the exact source of the flood water, and clear the clog, or fix the leak. We recommend calling SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373
  2. 3. DOCUMENT THE DAMAGE: Even minor bathroom flooding can turn into serious water damage, so take pictures before you start cleaning. Save them as documentation in case you need to file an insurance claim.
  3. CLEAN OUT CABINETS: Get everything out of vanity cabinets and any other storage in contact with the wet floor. Check these areas for damage, and determine what kind of cleanup they need.

Helpful Tip: Leave cabinet doors and drawers open to help circulate air and speed up the drying process.

  1. REMOVE STANDING WATER: Tackle minor floods on tile or vinyl floors with old towels, and finish up with a good mopping. Lay newspapers flat inside cabinets to absorb excess moisture in hard-to-reach spaces. If the flooding is severe, please call SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.
  2. USE A WET VACUUM: If you’re dealing with several inches of flooding or a carpeted bathroom floor, extract the water with a wet vacuum. Be sure to follow the equipment’s instruction manual for safe use.

Flooding In Your Home

12/14/2020 (Permalink)

One of the most damaging and devastating things you can ever experience is flooding in your home. However, you’re not alone, we’re here to help you with some steps on how to deal with flood damage.

There are many causes of household flooding including – Heavy rains, Sewer back-up, Appliance Malfunctions, Malfunctioning sump-pump, and Burst pipes. This can be a time of great confusion as to what to do concerning safety, cleanup and even how to pay for all the repair and restoration.

  1. Call Your Insurance Company

Your homeowners’ insurance will vary depending on what policies you have. The insurance company will send an adjuster to look at and assess the damage and determine if it is a covered loss. Document the values of each and every item you can think of, and take as many photos as possible before, after and during the cleanup. This will help the adjuster when he/ she comes to assess the damage. You can call SERVPRO Of Marine City/ Romeo at 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.

  1. Safety First

The most important step in any major home disaster like flooding and water damage, is to make sure yourself and your family are safe. There are several things you can do to stay safe in your home.

Turn off the power: Water and electricity obviously do not mix. But, if turning off the power requires you to enter or stand in wet areas it is best to leave it alone and call an electrician. Do not reenter a flooded home before turning the electricity off.

Wear Protective Gear: Be sure to wear protective clothing–such as rubber boots and gloves–when you re-enter your home. This will protect you from injuries that can get bacteria filled water in them.

Protect Your Valuables: You can lift wood furniture off the wet carpet areas and insert tin foil under the feet to prevent staining of the carpet. Likewise, remove any rugs that may be on wet flooring. You may be forced to leave your home if the flooding is bad enough. Make sure it is also safe when you return to your home to begin dealing with the aftermath.

FLOODED BASEMENT

9/21/2020 (Permalink)

WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOUR BASEMENT FLOODS?

Unexpected issues in your home aren't enjoyable, but they are common. A flooded basement can give even the most stoic homeowner a sense of helplessness and panic. If you have a basement flood, try not to over-analyze the situation. It may not be as bad as you think. According to the experts at SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo that provides 24/7/365 586-336-7373 response to flood situations in your home, here are some things you can do if your basement floods:

  • Before you do anything, make sure to shut off any power around the area, including electricity and gas. Never enter a flooded area while the power is on. If you aren’t sure how to shut these areas off, call a qualified electrician before entering the room and beginning to work.

    • Unless the water is caused by rainfall, take action as soon as you notice flooding. If rain or storm water is the cause of the flood, wait until it's passed before getting to work.

    • Regardless of the water source, wear boots and gloves for protection. Take care when walking and moving around the flooded area since it will likely offer itself as a slipping hazard.

    • Determine the source of the water. If a burst pipe is the cause of the flood, shut off water to the basement.

    • If your basement has a floor drain, check to make sure it didn’t become clogged during the flood. Keeping it open and functioning will help drain the water.

    • Start removing water from the basement. Depending on the amount of water, you can use a sump pump, a pool pump, a wet/dry vacuum or a mop and bucket. Sump pumps are located in the lowest part of a basement and work by sending water away from the home after a flooding. Without a sump pump, water can come up through the ground and enter the home causing flooding in not only the basement, but other parts of the house as well. After most of the water has been removed, soak up the remainder with a cloth or sponges. DO NOT be shy about asking for help -- many times extra sets of hands can make the removal go faster.

    • Move damaged items out of the basement to dry in a well-ventilated area. If weather permits, a sunny place may lend itself as the best option. It’s best not to dry out items inside the basement, which is already damp. A good rule of thumb is to give items about 48 hours to thoroughly dry. If they remain wet, they may need to be discarded in order to avoid mold and mildew. The best advice is to inspect things carefully after the 48-hour period, and decide the best course of action. Don’t try to save wet cardboard boxes, since they can be especially susceptible to bacterial growth. Salvage the contents of the boxes if you can, and discard the cardboard containers to be safe.

    • Don’t touch electrical items like televisions, stereos or lamps, even with the electricity disconnected. It’s best to let electrical items dry in place, and refer to an electrician or qualified repairman to determine the amount of damage.

    • Rip up carpeting and get it out of the basement as soon as possible. Carpeting can prevent the floor underneath from drying if it’s not removed quickly. Although it can be difficult to adequately dry out these materials, sometimes wet carpeting can be saved. Consult a SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo specialist.

    • Give the basement several days of drying time. Open windows and doors to get as much ventilation as possible, and place fans around the room for air circulation and to speed drying time. You can also rent a dehumidifier if you don’t have one already.

    • Wash down floors and walls to remove any dirt left behind by the water. Remove any wet or damaged drywall and insulation to prevent the spreading of mold.

    • When the floor and walls are dry, use an anti-mildew spray to discourage mold and mildew from developing.

    • If you have flood insurance, call your home insurance company and report the flood. Confirm your coverage limits, deductible amount, and claim procedures.

FLOODED BATHROOM

9/8/2020 (Permalink)

Flooded bathroom? Here Are Some Helpful Tips.

Clogged toilets can happen in the best-kept homes. Busy families can forget someone’s filling up the tub. A pipe can freeze during the night and burst before you’re awake. From faulty plumbing to a sewage backup, it doesn’t take much to flood the bathroom.

Before you grab a mop, ask yourself a quick question: Do you know the best way to take care of a flooded bathroom and keep water damage to a minimum?

SERVPRO Marine City /Romeo 586-336-7373 we know how to tackle this kind of work. It’s a big job, and you need to take it one step at a time. It’s our goal to help make your next bathroom cleanup project a little easier.

You want to address bathroom flooding as quickly as you can. Standing water soaks subflooring, wicks into sheetrock and creates a perfect breeding environment for unhealthy mold and mildew.

These 10 steps get you on the road to flooded bathroom recovery.

  1. TURN OFF THE WATER: Locate the sink or toilet valve so that you can shut off the water supply and stop the flooding. The oval-shaped knobs are usually under the sink and behind the toilet.

Helpful Tip: If you’re dealing with a burst pipe, turn off your home’s water supply at the outside main.

  1. FIX THE PROBLEM: Determine the exact source of the flood water, and clear the clog, or fix the leak. We recommend calling SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373
  2. 3. DOCUMENT THE DAMAGE: Even minor bathroom flooding can turn into serious water damage, so take pictures before you start cleaning. Save them as documentation in case you need to file an insurance claim.
  3. CLEAN OUT CABINETS: Get everything out of vanity cabinets and any other storage in contact with the wet floor. Check these areas for damage, and determine what kind of cleanup they need.

Helpful Tip: Leave cabinet doors and drawers open to help circulate air and speed up the drying process.

  1. REMOVE STANDING WATER: Tackle minor floods on tile or vinyl floors with old towels, and finish up with a good mopping. Lay newspapers flat inside cabinets to absorb excess moisture in hard-to-reach spaces. If the flooding is severe, please call SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.
  2. USE A WET VACUUM: If you’re dealing with several inches of flooding or a carpeted bathroom floor, extract the water with a wet vacuum. Be sure to follow the equipment’s instruction manual for safe use.
  3. 7. PULL OFF BASEBOARDS: Carefully pry baseboards away from walls so that you can check sheetrock at floor level. The porous material can quickly soak up flood water, and you need to

Helpful Tip: leave the baseboards off until you’ve finished cleaning the bathroom.

  1. START THE DRYING PROCESS: Set up as many fans as possible, and arrange them so that their air circulation creates crosscurrents. Consider renting a large dehumidifier to speed up the drying process.{Dehumidifiers remove access moisture}
  2. REMOVE DAMAGED SHEETROCK: Soaked sheetrock is a perfect breeding ground for mold, so don’t try to salvage it. Tear out and replace any wallboard that doesn’t dry within three days.
  3. SCRUB AND DISINFECT: Clean floors, cabinets and any other surfaces affected by bathroom flood waters. Finish off the job with a disinfectant designed to prevent mold growth.

YOU CAN’T ALWAYS DO IT YOURSELF:

If you have experienced any of the above, please don’t hesitate to call SERVPRO marine city/ romeo @ 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.

What Do You Do When Your Basement Floods

9/1/2020 (Permalink)

Unexpected issues in your home aren't enjoyable, but they are common. A flooded basement can give even the most stoic homeowner a sense of helplessness and panic. If you have a basement flood, try not to over-analyze the situation. It may not be as bad as you think. According to the experts at SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo that provides 24/7/365 586-336-7373 response to flood situations in your home, here’s some things you can do if your basement floods:

  • Before you do anything, make sure to shut off any power around the area, including electricity and gas. Never enter a flooded area while the power is on. If you aren’t sure how to shut these areas off, call a qualified electrician before entering the room and beginning to work.

    • Unless the water is caused by rainfall, take action as soon as you notice flooding. If rain or storm water is the cause of the flood, wait until it's passed before getting to work.

    • Regardless of the water source, wear boots and gloves for protection. Take care when walking and moving around the flooded area since it will likely offer itself as a slipping hazard.

    • Determine the source of the water. If a burst pipe is the cause of the flood, shut off water to the basement.

    • If your basement has a floor drain, check to make sure it didn’t become clogged during the flood. Keeping it open and functioning will help drain the water.

    • Start removing water from the basement. Depending on the amount of water, you can use a sump pump, a pool pump, a wet/dry vacuum or a mop and bucket. Sump pumps are located in the lowest part of a basement and work by sending water away from the home after a flooding. Without a sump pump, water can come up through the ground and enter the home causing flooding in not only the basement, but other parts of the house as well. After most of the water has been removed, soak up the remainder with a cloth or sponges. DO NOT be shy about asking for help -- many times extra sets of hands can make the removal go faster.

    • Move damaged items out of the basement to dry in a well-ventilated area. If weather permits, a sunny place may lend itself as the best option. It’s best not to dry out items inside the basement, which is already damp. A good rule of thumb is to give items about 48 hours to thoroughly dry. If they remain wet, they may need to be discarded in order to avoid mold and mildew. The best advice is to inspect things carefully after the 48-hour period, and decide the best course of action. Don’t try to save wet cardboard boxes, since they can be especially susceptible to bacterial growth. Salvage the contents of the boxes if you can, and discard the cardboard containers to be safe.

    • Don’t touch electrical items like televisions, stereos or lamps, even with the electricity disconnected. It’s best to let electrical items dry in place, and refer to an electrician or qualified repairman to determine the amount of damage.

    • Rip up carpeting and get it out of the basement as soon as possible. Carpeting can prevent the floor underneath from drying if it’s not removed quickly. Although it can be difficult to adequately dry out these materials, sometimes wet carpeting can be saved. Consult a SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo specialist.

    • Give the basement several days of drying time. Open windows and doors to get as much ventilation as possible, and place fans around the room for air circulation and to speed drying time. You can also rent a dehumidifier if you don’t have one already.

    • Wash down floors and walls to remove any dirt left behind by the water. Remove any wet or damaged drywall and insulation to prevent the spreading of mold.

    • When the floor and walls are dry, use an anti-mildew spray to discourage mold and mildew from developing.

    • If you have flood insurance, call your home insurance company and report the flood. Confirm your coverage limits, deductible amount, and claim procedures.

Flood Safety Advice

8/26/2020 (Permalink)

Before, during and after. Prepare a family disaster plan for floods. Make an emergency kit for your home and your car with emergency supplies, such as flashlight, batteries, water and non-perishable foods. Kit information can be found at the following website https://www.ready.gov/kit

Before A Flood:

. Move insurance policies, documents and other valuables to a safe deposit box.

. Learn how to turn off utilities to your home and keep your cars gas tank full, so you won't be stranded.

. Learn the best route to high ground.

. Purchase flood insurance.

During A Flood:

. Be aware that flash flooding can occur and move immediately to high ground.

. If you must evacuate, turn all utilities off at the main switches of valves. 

. Do Not Walk through moving water, no matter how shallow.

. Do Not Drive into flooded areas, no matter how shallow.

After A Flood:

. Listen for news reports on whether the community's water supply is safe to drink.

. Avoid floodwaters. Water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. Water may also be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.

. Stay away from down power lines, and report them to your power company.

. Never try to walk, swim, drive, or play in floodwater.

. Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals.

Water Heater Failure

8/26/2020 (Permalink)

Whether equipped with a conventional or a tankless water heater, both are susceptible to structural failure and may result in property damage caused by flooding.

Modern plumbing codes have attempted to address some of these issues by requiring a drain pan beneath conventional water heaters. However, leaks on or at water heaters are often pressurized and tend to spray beyond the area of the drain pan.

Depending upon the location of the heater, these leaks can go undetected until severe property damage occurs.

The best defense for such problems is routine inspection and maintenance. However, when faced with a leaking or flooding water heater:

(1) Turn the water supply “off”.

It is imperative that the heater have a working shut off valve. Many years ago, the shut off valves installed on water heaters were typically of the gate valve style. These valves are still very common today. Unfortunately, these valves can be very problematic and often do not fully close. SERVPRO Marine City/Romeo recommends that gate valves always be replaced with ball valves for residential water heater applications.

(2) Turn the power or gas “off” to the heater.

(3) If the leak is coming from the tank, or if the heater is to be replaced, drain the water heater (follow steps 1-8 in the Water Flushing Procedure. Upon draining, close the drain valve on heater.

(4) Address leaks as necessary.

(5) Thoroughly remediate water spillages/floods.

(6) Purge/bleed water system. (Follow Steps 11 – 13 of the Water Heater Flushing Procedure)

(7) Restore power to heater.

Remember, SERVPRO Marine City/Romeo is available around the clock, every day to assist when needed.

How To Prevent Dishwasher Overflow Or Flood

8/26/2020 (Permalink)

How to Prevent a Dishwasher Overflow or Flood

The best way to prevent a leaking dishwasher is to follow the instructions, use the right soap and do regular maintenance. Here are a few tips to keep your dishwasher from leaking or overflowing.

  • Load It Properly One of the easiest ways to prevent dishwasher leaks is to load it properly. Follow the instructions for loading your dishwasher to avoid blocking the sprayers.
  • Use the Right Soap Always use the right kind and amount of soap for your dishwasher. Using too much or the wrong kind of soap will create too much foam and cause leaks. 
  • Clean Your Dishwasher This may sound odd, but you need to clean your dishwasher every so often. You should clean the seals, gaskets and sprayer nozzles every three months. You should also flush or change the filters too.
  • Check the Supply Line and Drain Hose Your dishwasher has two hoses, the clean water supply line and the wastewater drain hose. Since they can leak and cause a kitchen flood, you should check them every six months.
  • Only Run it While You Are Home One of the easiest ways to prevent a dishwasher leak or flood is to only run it when you are home and awake. If there is a problem, you can limit or even prevent damage.

Basement Water

8/7/2020 (Permalink)

Waking up to a basement full of water is never a good day. When your sump pump fails, what do you do? First turn off the water in your home and then call SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo.

SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo had a call from a customer in East China Township, their basement flooded due to a blockage in a basement pipe. We were on site within an hour of their call and started the clean up. Our trained technicians pumped out the water and used advanced equipment to begin drying the wet basement. The basement is monitored every day until it is completely dry. The customer was very satisfied with our rapid response and professional technicians.

SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo is here to help 24 hours a day 7 days a week when residential and commercial customers have water emergencies. Call us at (586)336-7373 

Water Levels

7/17/2020 (Permalink)

Rising water in St Clair County has caused major flooding to many homes for the second summer in a row. Severe climate changes have created record level water heights.

These levels have caused a lot of flooding in East China township. Numerous clients have had water claims not just in their basements but their main level of their homes.

SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo is available 24 hours 7 days a week. Our trained technicians work swiftly to restore property. Once the water is extracted, we use specialized test equipment to find hidden water and advanced drying techniques to dry and monitor property properly. Our job is to preserve and protect, stop any more damage from happening and restore damaged property to prior condition.

Call SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo at (586)-336-7373 we are available 24/7.

Flood Vs Water Damage and your insurance

7/8/2020 (Permalink)

Floods

The National Flood Insurance Program defines flood as: A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of two or more acres of normally dry land area or of two or more properties (at least one of which is the policyholder’s property) from: 

  • Overflow of inland or tidal waters;

  • Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source;

  • Mudflow; or

  • Collapse or subsidence of land along the shore of a lake or similar body of water as a result of erosion or undermining caused by waves or currents of water exceeding anticipated cyclical levels that result in a flood as defined above.

Water Damage

Unlike a flood, water damage is typically covered under homeowners insurance, but you should read your policy carefully to determine exactly what kind of water damage the insurer will cover. In general, water damage differs from flood damage in that it occurs before water comes in contact with the ground. For example:

  • Severe rainstorms soak through your roof, damaging walls and floors.

  • An upstairs pipe bursts and water saturates the ceiling below.

  • A toilet overflows soaking your bathroom floorboards.

  • A hailstorm breaks your windows and allows water into your home.

Simply put, the main difference between a flood claim and a water damage claim is that flood water comes from a natural source and two or more properties are involved (if you reside in a generally residential versus rural area). If you and your neighbors are all having water issues due to heavy rains and/or rising waters, then you are likely dealing with a flood insurance claim. On the other hand, if you are dealing with water in your house but your neighbor doesn’t have any issues (again, in a residential area), you are most likely dealing with a water damage claim.

Generally, insurance companies cover water damages where the home or business owner could not prevent the hazard. However, you may have trouble convincing an insurance company to cover damage caused by a maintenance problem that they believe should have been repaired—such as a leaky roof that lets in rain, a faulty toilet that overflows frequently, or continuous leaking near a faucet.

The most important thing you can do is to carefully review your insurance policies so that you know precisely what will and will not be covered, preferably before your home or office is damaged by a flood and other types of water damage.

Source: https://www.ncmic.com/learning-center/articles/insurance/business-insurance/flood-damage-vs-water-damage/

My Home/Business Flooded Now What?

5/31/2020 (Permalink)

Water:

My House/Business Flooded Now What?

Experiencing a Flood can be a stressful time for any person but knowing what to do when you notice a food in your home or commercial building can make the experience much easier to manage and get you back to normal as soon as possible.

  1. Contact your insurance company: If you have an insurance plan that includes Flood Insurance or separate Flood Insurance contact them. These plans are very beneficial as Flood damage can prove to be extremely costly without a policy. Getting proper Documentation is also imperative with the help of SERVPRO we can ensure that you get the proper documentation to help along with making your claim
  2. Protect Yourself: Ensure that before you reenter your home or place of business that authorities say that it is safe and when you do reenter make sure that you are wary of any danger including standing water especially if electricity is on, use an N95 mask if there is mold damage
  3. Call a Professional: The experts at SERVPRO of Marine City Romeo will be ready at your earliest convenience to assess the damage on the property a create a plan to mitigate in a timely manner.

There are several other measures you can take if you are struck with a flooded home or Business, but leave it to the Professionals to make it "Like it never even happened."

First Signs of Water Damage

5/31/2020 (Permalink)

When experiencing a flood in your home or place of business early action is key to prevent as much damage as possible.

  1. Check the Floors: On wood flooring look for cracks or buckling or a warped floor. On carpeting look for wet spots, gradual
  2. Look for stains: Water stains can appear on the floor around appliances such as your bathtub, sink, and toilet as well as on walls and flooring. If the stains appear in an unusual place that could indicate a leak in a pipe. Beware also of cracked drywall or drywall that is soft to the touch\
  3. Inspect Outside: Take a look at the exterior of your house. Keep an eye out for standing pools of water. This indicates that there is poor drainage, gutters aren’t transporting water enough from the house or leaky rain gutters. These issues pose a threat to the foundation of your house

Rising Water

9/6/2019 (Permalink)

Rising water in St Clair County has caused major flooding to many homes. Harsh winters, heavy ice from up North and severe climate changes have created record level water heights.

SERVPRO of Marine City /Romeo has had several calls from customers in Algonac Michigan with flooded homes. Water can cause structural damage and should be dealt with quickly. SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo is available 24 hours 7 days a week. Our trained technicians will work swiftly to restore your property. They use specialized test equipment to find hidden water and advanced drying techniques to monitor and dry your property properly. Our job is to preserve and protect, stop any more damage from happening and restore damaged property to prior condition.

SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo is here to help and make your property and contents, "Like it never even happened."

Water in a East China, Michigan, St. Clair County

8/28/2019 (Permalink)

Water in Basement Water in Basement

Sump Pump failure caused this basement to become a soggy mess.  This photo shows the cardboard boxes soaked. 

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo responded to a call from the home owner and immediately responded to their home.  they proceeded to pump out water, remove damaged items, decontaminate area.

The home owners were impressed with quick response and the professional way the team restored their basement to clean livable setting.

Water Damage in New Baltimore, Mich.

8/28/2019 (Permalink)

Hand written Thank you letter from one of recent customers after we cleaned up her home from a water loss. Recent customer expressed her appreciation for the work we did for her by sending us a much appreciated Thank You letter.

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo  (586) 336 7373

Received a wonderful letter from a customer that needed water removed from kitchen and living room due to a broken line in the refrigerator.

Letters like this help the moral of everyone at SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo.  This is one of the reasons we do our best for our customers.  We have pride in what we do and enjoy doing a good job and receiving notes of appreciation.

                    "The SERVPRO Way"

Flooding

8/16/2019 (Permalink)

Here in the Community and Here to Help!

With extremely high water levels in the Great Lakes, flood warnings were in effect for St Clair County for most of our spring and summer months. Area residents were advised to be aware of rising water levels and to be prepared for area flooding. 

Do you know where to shut off your electric and gas? Do you know who you would call first? Are you prepared to move quickly and safely? These are a few questions you should be asking yourself. Are you prepared for a disaster.

SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo can help you with all of this. We will gather all the important information and prepare a plan for you to have all in one place. SERVPRO has an app you can download on your phone so all the information is always with you wherever you go. Call SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo at (586)336-7373 and we will help you get started.

Water Damage Stages

7/11/2019 (Permalink)

Stage 1

The free-flow of water by gravity. Gravity will level out the available water and cause it to find cracks in the floor, plumbing penetrations and many other openings. This affects the floors below as well as other adjacent spaces. Quick action at earlier stages of water damage will reduce the costs and resulting cleanup. On the other hand, delaying action increases both exponentially.

Stage 2

The wicking of moisture into materials that are in direct contact with water. Damage continues to increase as long as free-water touches gypsum board, wood floors, furniture and documents due to the tendency of materials to draw in moisture through capillary action. This damage is mitigated by quick and thorough water-extraction, as it will remove the free-water and stop the wicking. Effective action at this stage will drastically reduce the time and effort to dry out the wet building materials.

Stage 3

High humidity damage. This occurs when the moisture on and in the wet materials begins to evaporate, saturating the surrounding air. Previously unaffected materials now take on moisture. Early signs of high humidity damage include condensation forming on walls, ceiling tiles sagging from high moisture content and paper stock taking on moisture to the point it cannot be used for copying.

This damage is mitigated by controlling the relative humidity inside the building through the use of high-capacity dehumidifiers. Quick action at this stage will keep the moisture content of the building material and contents below the threshold at which they will support microbial growth.

Stage 4

Active microbial growth. This begins when materials have taken on sufficient moisture to be able to support mold and mildew. The threshold for most cellulose-based material (i.e., wood, documents and the paper covering on gypsum board) is when their moisture content exceeds 20 to 25 percent of their weight.

Reducing this damage is accomplished by controlling three key conditions of the building’s air: relative humidity, temperature and air circulation. Controlling these will create an environment that will rapidly dry the materials back to their preloss moisture content. Effective action at this point will generally confine the damage to the area that was directly affected by the water damage event.

Stage 5

The spread of microbial to other, originally unaffected areas of the building. The spread of microbial (i.e., mold, mildew, odors and other pathogens) may eventually occur due to unchecked microbial growth in the affected area, the movement of people throughout the building, air circulation systems and/or elevator movement from floor-to-floor. If this stage of water damage occurs, a comprehensive plan must be put together involving various indoor air quality professionals and contractors.

For all your water damage needs contact SERVPRO 24 hours a Day & Days a Week. 

Original Article; DH Tech Five Stages of Water Damage

The First 24 hours after a flood

7/7/2019 (Permalink)

A Flooded home/business is serious business. What you do in the first 24 hours after contacting SERVPRO of course will determine the amount of damage to your property. 

Avoid Additional Risks:

If the flood was serious enough for you to leave your home, be sure you stay safe upon your return. FEMA warns that you should check for any structural damage before entering the home and contact utility companies if you suspect damage to water, gas, electric, and sewer lines.it's important to have a working flashlight and turn off all water and electrical sources within the home, says Dr. Maurice A. Ramirez, author of "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Disaster Preparedness." Even if the power isn't operational, it's a good idea to go to your fuse box and turn off the main, plus all of the individual fuse connections. That way, if the power is reactivated, you're not at risk for mixing standing water and electricity.

What to Do in the First 24 Hours After a Flood
After flood waters subside, document, work with your insurer, and clean up safely.

 

Whether a flood is caused by ground water, falling water, or home water system malfunction, there are some best practices you'll need to employ within the first 24 hours after the flood to ensure the safety of your home and family and give you the best outcome possible with your insurance company.

Avoid Additional Risks

If the flood was serious enough for you to leave your home, be sure you stay safe upon your return. The Federal Emergency Management Agency warns that you should check for any visible structural damage, such as warping, loosened or cracked foundation elements, cracks, and holes before entering the home and contact utility companies if you suspect damage to water, gas, electric, and sewer lines.  

In addition, it's important to have a working flashlight and turn off all water and electrical sources within the home, says Dr. Maurice A. Ramirez, author of "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Disaster Preparedness." Even if the power isn't operational, it's a good idea to go to your fuse box and turn off the main, plus all of the individual fuse connections. That way, if the power is reactivated, you're not at risk for mixing standing water and electricity.

Before you remove any water or make any repairs, fully document the damage for your insurer by taking photos or video. Digital versions are best, says Ramirez, because they can be stored electronically and easily copied. If you start removing water or making repairs before you photograph the damage, you could potentially decrease the extent of your coverage, he says.

Protect Your Health

Even if the water in your home is clear, it could be contaminated by sewage or household chemicals. Ramirez recommends wearing waders, hip- or waist-high waterproof boots. In addition, wear rubber gloves to remove water-damaged possessions and to avoid contaminants. 

Of course there are several other precautions and steps to take but these few are imperative in ensuring your home and family do not suffer from the great damage a flood can cause. 

These steps were found at: https://www.houselogic.com/finances-taxes/home-insurance/what-do-first-24-hours-after-flood/

Flood Preparedness and prevention

6/10/2019 (Permalink)

With the threat of high water levels and flooding in St. Clair County and surrounding areas there are several precautions those in the 'Danger Zones' Should take to prevent an unforeseen and costly accident. 

In Order to Prevent and prepare for  flooding  

Keep Gutters Clean to prevent more costly damage 

Ensure especially if you live on the Water or on low land that the ground area within a ten foot radius of your home slopes downwards 

Have your roof carefully inspected regularly  

Keep a written record of all valuable belongings therefore SERVPRO and your insurance agency can work together to ensure they are protected. 

Many of These tips are from the Clay Township Police Department's press release 

Should You Experience Flooding.. 

Stop the Flow of water to minimize damage

Move Essential items to an upper Level Floor 

Disconnect all electronic devices and appliances

Shut off Water gas and electricity, if told to do so

Above all else, Have a plan in place in case evacuation is necessary. Know where you can take shelter and ensure you have all necessities.

How To Properly use Sandbags as Flood prevention

6/10/2019 (Permalink)

In the wake of the St. Clair County flood Warnings You've probably heard about using sandbags to help prevent flooding in your home or business. Little did you know as with any prevention and protection there is a right way and a wrong way. 

Sandbagging is an old flood prevention technique that's simple, but still effective. If the bags are not filled and stacked properly, though, they will be useless. Here are some tips and steps for the most effective way use sandbags:

  • Only use sand in the bags:
  • Try to use coarse sand:
  • When building a sandbag wall, it's crucial for the bags to shape around each other tightly:
  • Stagger the sandbags on top of one another:
  • Set up your sandbags before flooding is anticipated:

Sandbag Tips and tricks found at:https://www.nola.com/homegarden/2017/08/how_to_properly_fill_and_stack.html

Residential and Commercial Water Damage Experts

8/20/2018 (Permalink)

Our staff at SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is highly trained in residential and commercial property damage restoration. Rest assured our staff is equipped with the certification, training and knowledge to restore any of your property damage needs. With a nationwide system of qualified franchises, no damage is too large or too small for SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo.

We pride ourselves on our knowledge, experience and continued education. Our certification comes from the IICRC. The IICRC is a nonprofit certification and Standards Developing Organization (SDO) for the inspection, cleaning and restoration industries. The IICRC is recognized internationally as a knowledgeable industry voice and resource. The IICRC has led the way in establishing the main industry standards and reference guides for professional carpet cleaning, upholstery and fabric cleaning, water damage restoration and mold remediation. 

If you or someone you know experiences water damage in their home or business contact the local professionals at SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo. We are here to help 24/7. We can be reached at (586) 336-7373.

Water Restoration Professional Products

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

When contamination exists, SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo uses professional water damage restoration products to return the loss environment to a preloss condition. Competence in this area requires an awareness of the basic types of products, understanding proper product usage, and how to explain these products to customers and/or clients.

General Chemical Terminology:

1. Antimicrobial. The word antimicrobial means literally “against microbes.” An antimicrobial agent is any chemical used “against” microorganisms to prevent their development or to limit or stop their growth (examples would be fungistats and mildewstats). The word antimicrobial can sometimes refer more generally to various chemicals registered as disinfectants, germicides, fungicides, virucides, sporicides, mildewcides, or sanitizers. 

2. Disinfectants. Disinfectants and germicides are antimicrobials that destroy about 99 percent of organisms they contact on surfaces where applied. They may or may not affect bacterial or fungal spores, which are usually dormant, reproductive bodies. 

3. Sanitizers. Sanitizers are used to decrease the number of microbials to acceptable levels. A product listed as a sanitizer reduces microbes to levels considered by public health authorities to be safe. Under the right conditions, however, the microbes may grow back.

4. Sterilizers. A sterilizer destroys all microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi spores. Sterilizing microbes in a water damage is generally not possible. Sterilizers can only be used on inanimate surfaces that can withstand the chemicals. Chlorine products are used as sterilizing agents.

5. Mildewstats and fungistats (known as “stats”) slow the growth of fungi on organic materials such as textiles, leather, and paper. They do not necessarily kill microbes, but prevent their further growth when used according to label directions. 

6. Biocides are chemical agents that destroy or kill living organisms (-cide meaning “kill”). For example, a “virucide” would kill or inactivate viruses. In the restoration industry, however, the term biocide is used generally to refer to any chemical agent that affects the growth of microbes like bacteria and fungi. Because of the general use of the term biocide, any particular product called a biocide may not actually “kill” microbes. 

7. Sporicides. A disinfectant that is effective in controlling bacterial or fungal spores when used according to label directions.

Categories of Contaminated Water

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo uses specific remediation procedures for contaminated water.  The industry has created different “categories” to describe the range of contamination in the water. Category 1 is sanitary, Category 2 is significantly contaminated, and Category 3 is grossly contaminated. 

The category determines what work activities and protective measures are needed. Category 2 water projects (significant contamination) can typically be handled with just gloves to minimize skin contact. Category 3 is much more intense. Occupants need to be evacuated, and workers should wear appropriate personal protective equipment, such as a full-face respirator with combination HEPA particulate/organic vapor filters, full-body suit, nitrile gloves, heavy-duty work gloves, and waterproof boots. These items are needed to protect you from being potentially exposed to contamination.

Helpful Tips To Prevent Basement Floods

8/8/2018 (Permalink)

Helpful Tips To Prevent Basement Floods

Many houses in St. Clair County rely on a sump pump to keep the basement from flooding.  When a big rain storm comes through, the sump pump will really be needed... and that's also the time that the power to a  neighborhood is most likely going to get knocked out, disabling the sump pump and allowing the basement to flood.

If your sump pump quits working, will you know about it before your basement floods?  Do you have a backup in place?  Does it work?  Are you sure? If you depend on a sump pump to keep your basement from flooding, it's important to have a backup system in place, just like it's important to back up the hard drive on your computer. 

It is one of those things that most people don't think about until it's too late.  If you want to protect your basement from flooding, get a backup system.  There are a few different backup systems available.

1. Secondary Electric Pump: A secondary electric pump would be a good option to keep your basement from flooding in the event that your primary sump pump failed.  The secondary pump would need to be installed a little bit higher in the sump basket than the primary pump.  The downside to installing one of these is that if the power to your house went out, the pump would be useless.

2. Battery Back Up: By far, the most common type of backup is a battery powered system.  This consists of a big heavy battery that's about the size and shape of a car battery, as well as a backup sump pump that sits in the sump basket a little bit higher than the primary pump.  This system will save your basement from flooding if your sump pump fails or your power goes out.

3. Hydraulic Pump: Another backup option for your sump basket is to install a pump that is powered by the municipal water pressure coming in to your home.  The nice thing about hydraulic pumps is that you don't have to worry about keeping a battery charged all the time, and if you have an extended power outage, you won't have to worry about the pump failing.

4. High Level Alarm: No matter what type of system you have installed, it's a good idea to have a high level alarm installed in your sump basket.  These alarms will sound off if the water level in your sump basket gets too high. If you don't have a backup system in place, these alarms will at least tell you that you have a problem and you need to jump in to action.

In the event you experience a flood call SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo at (586) 336-7373.

By Reuben Saltzman, Home Inspector      Structure Tech Home Inspectors

Flash floods and Water

8/3/2018 (Permalink)

Floods are among the most frequent and costly natural disasters in terms of human hardship and economic loss. As much as 90 percent of the damage related to all natural disasters (excluding droughts) is caused by floods and associated debris flows. Most communities in the United States can experience some kind of flooding. Over the 10-year period from 1988 to 1997, floods cost the Nation, on average, $3.7 billion annually. The long-term (1940 to 1999) annual average of lives lost is 110 per year, mostly as a result of flash floods.

What Causes Floods?

Flooding occurs in known floodplains when prolonged rainfall over several days, intense rainfall over a short period of time, or an ice or debris jam causes a river or stream to overflow and flood the surrounding area. Melting snow can combine with rain in the winter and early spring; severe thunderstorms can bring heavy rain in the spring and summer; or tropical cyclones can bring intense rainfall to the coastal and inland states in the summer and fall.

Flash floods occur within six hours of a rain event, or after a dam or levee failure, or following a sudden release of water held by an ice or debris jam, and flash floods can catch people unprepared. You will not always have a warning that these deadly, sudden floods are coming. So if you live in areas prone to flash floods, plan now to protect your family and property.

As land is converted from fields or woodlands to roads and parking lots, it loses its ability to absorb rainfall. Urbanization increases runoff two to six times over what would occur on natural terrain. During periods of urban flooding, streets can become swift moving rivers, while basements and viaducts can become death traps as they fill with water.

Several factors contribute to flooding. Two key elements are rainfall intensity and duration. Intensity is the rate of rainfall, and duration is how long the rain lasts. Topography, soil conditions, and ground cover also play important roles. Most flash flooding is caused by slow-moving thunderstorms, thunderstorms repeatedly moving over the same area, or heavy rains from hurricanes and tropical storms. Floods, on the other hand, can be slow- or fast-rising, but generally develop over a period of hours or days.

Learn about flooding and flash flooding in your area by contacting the local emergency management office, National Weather Service (NWS) office, your American Red Cross chapter, or your planning and zoning department. If you are at risk, take steps to reduce damage and the risk of injury or loss to your family.

Awareness Information

Know the difference between WATCHES and WARNINGS.

  • A National Weather Service (NWS) WATCH is a message indicating that conditions favor the occurrence of a certain type of hazardous weather. For example, a severe thunderstorm watch means that a severe thunderstorm is expected in the next six hours or so within an area approximately 120 to 150 miles wide and 300 to 400 miles long (36,000 to 60,000 square miles). The NWS Storm Prediction Center issues such watches. Local NWS forecast offices issue other watches (flash flood, winter weather, etc.) 12 to 36 hours in advance of a possible hazardous-weather or flooding event. Each local forecast office usually covers a state or a portion of a state.
  • An NWS WARNING indicates that a hazardous event is occurring or is imminent in about 30 minutes to an hour. Local NWS forecast offices issue warnings on a county-by-county basis.
  • Many more WATCHES are issued than WARNINGS. A WATCH is the first sign a flood may occur, and when one is issued, you should be aware of potential flood hazards.

    Be aware of flood hazards. Floods can roll boulders, tear out trees, destroy buildings and bridges, and scour out new channels. Flood waters can reach heights of 10 to 20 feet and often carry a deadly cargo of debris. Flood-producing rains can also trigger catastrophic debris slides.

    Regardless of how a flood or flash flood occurs, the rule for being safe is simple: head for higher ground and stay away from flood waters. Even a shallow depth of fast-moving flood water produces more force than most people imagine. The most dangerous thing you can do is to try walking, swimming, or driving through flood waters. Two feet of water will carry away most automobiles.

    Plan for a Flood

    • Develop a Family Disaster Plan. Please see the "Family Disaster Plan" section for general family planning information. Develop flood- specific planning. Learn about your area's flood risk and elevation above flood stage.
    • Contact your local Red Cross chapter, emergency management office, local National Weather Service office, or planning and zoning department about your area's flood risk.
    • Knowing the elevation of your property in relation to nearby streams and dams will let you know if forecasted flood levels will affect your home.

    If you are at risk from floods:

  • Talk to your insurance agent. Homeowners' policies do not cover flooding. Ask about the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).
  • Use a NOAA Weather Radio with a tone-alert feature, or a portable, battery-powered radio (or television) for updated emergency information.
  • Develop an evacuation plan. (See "Evacuation" in the "Family Disaster Plan" section.) Everyone in your family should know where to go if they have to leave. Trying to make plans at the last minute can be upsetting and create confusion.
  • Discuss floods with your family. Everyone should know what to do in case all family members are not together. Discussing floods ahead of time helps reduce fear and anxiety and lets everyone know how to respond.
  • What to Tell Children

  • If you come upon flood waters, stop, turn around, and go another way. Climb to higher ground. If it is moving swiftly, even water six inches deep can knock you off your feet. Many people are swept away wading through flood waters, resulting in injury or death.
  • Stay away from flooded areas. Even if it seems safe, flood waters may still be rising.
  • Never try to walk, swim, drive, or play in flood water. You may not be able to see on the surface how fast flood water is moving or see holes and submerged debris.
  • If you are in a vehicle and become surrounded by water, if you can get out safely, do so immediately and move to higher ground. Vehicles can be swept away in two feet of water.
  • Watch out for snakes in areas that were flooded. Flood waters flush snakes from their homes.
  • Stay away from creek and stream banks in flooded and recently flooded areas. The soaked banks often become unstable due to heavy rainfall and can suddenly give way, tossing you into rapidly moving water.
  • Never play around high water, storm drains, ditches, ravines, or culverts. It is very easy to be swept away by fast moving water.
  • Throw away all food that has come into contact with flood waters. Contaminated flood water contains bacteria and germs. Eating foods exposed to flood waters can make you very sick.
  • How to Protect Your Property

  • Keep insurance policies, documents, and other valuables in a safe-deposit box. You may need quick, easy access to these documents. Keep them in a safe place less likely to be damaged during a flood.
  • Avoid building in a floodplain unless you elevate and reinforce your home. Some communities do not permit building in known floodplains. If there are no restrictions, and you are building in a floodplain, take precautions, making it less likely your home will be damaged during a flood.
  • Raise your furnace, water heater, and electric panel to higher floors or the attic if they are in areas of your home that may be flooded. Raising this equipment will prevent damage. An undamaged water heater may be your best source of fresh water after a flood.
  • Install check valves in building sewer traps to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home. As a last resort, when floods threaten, use large corks or stoppers to plug showers, tubs, or basins.
  • Construct barriers such as levees, berms, and flood walls to stop flood water from entering the building. Permission to construct such barriers may be required by local building codes. Check local building codes and ordinances for safety requirements.
  • Seal walls in basements with waterproofing compounds to avoid seepage through cracks.
  • Consult with a construction professional for further information if these and other damage reduction measures can be taken. Check local building codes and ordinances for safety requirements.
  • Contact your local emergency management office for more information on mitigation options to further reduce potential flood damage. Your local emergency management office may be able to provide additional resources and information on ways to reduce potential damage.
  • Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit

    Please see the section "Disaster Supplies Kit" for general supplies kit information. Flood-specific supplies should include the following:

  • Disaster Supplies Kit basics.
  • Evacuation Supply Kit.
  • If you live in a frequently flooded area, stockpile emergency building materials. These include plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber, nails, hammer and saw, pry bar, sand, shovels, and sandbags.
  • Media and Community Education Ideas

  • Have your community join the National Flood Insurance Program. Any community may join the NFIP. Check with your local emergency management office for more information.
  • Publish a special section in your local newspaper with emergency information on floods and flash floods. Localize the information by printing the phone numbers of local emergency services offices, the American Red Cross chapter, and the nearest hospitals.
  • Interview local officials about land use management and building codes in floodplains.
  • Work with local emergency services and American Red Cross officials to prepare special reports for people with mobility impairments about what to do if an evacuation is ordered.
  • Periodically inform your community of local public warning systems. Explain the difference between flood watches and warnings. Let them know where to turn for emergency broadcast information should they hear a warning on their radio or television.
  • Assist hospitals and other operations that are critically affected by power failure by arranging for auxiliary power supplies.
  • Contact your local National Weather Service office or emergency management agency for information on local flood warning systems. River and rainfall readings are valuable to local emergency management agencies and the NWS in assessing flood conditions and taking appropriate actions. Advanced warning provided by early detection is critical to saving lives. Automatic flood detection systems are available commercially for flood-prone communities.
  • Publish emergency evacuation routes for areas prone to flooding.
  • What to Do Before Flooding Occurs

  • If it has been raining hard for several hours, or steadily raining for several days, be alert to the possibility of a flood. Floods happen as the ground becomes saturated.
  • Use a NOAA Weather Radio or a portable, battery-powered radio (or television) for updated emergency information. Local stations provide the best advice for your particular situation.
  • Listen for distant thunder. In some types of terrain, runoff from a faraway thunderstorm could be headed your way.
  • If you are stopping your vehicle, camp or park away from streams and washes, particularly during threatening conditions. Flood waters can rise quickly and carry you or your belongings away.
  • When in or along stream channels, be aware of distant events, such as dam breaks or thunderstorms that may cause flash floods in the area.
  • What to Do During a Flood WATCH

    When a flood or flash flood WATCH is issued:

  • Listen continuously to a NOAA Weather Radio, or a portable, battery-powered radio (or television) for updated emergency information. Local stations provide you with the best advice for your particular situation.
  • Everyone in a WATCH area should be ready to respond and act quickly. Floods and flash floods can happen quickly and without warning. Be ready to act immediately.
  • Be alert to signs of flooding, and if you live in a flood-prone area, be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. Floods can happen quickly and you may need to leave with little or no notice.
  • Follow the instructions and advice of local authorities. Local authorities are the most informed about affected areas. They will best be able to tell you areas to avoid.
  • If your residence is in a flood-prone area:

  • Fill bathtubs, sinks, and plastic bottles with clean water. Water may become contaminated or service may be interrupted.
  • Bring outdoor belongings, such as patio furniture, indoors. Unsecured items may be swept away and damaged by flood waters.
  • Move your furniture and valuables to higher floors of your home. If flood waters affect your home, higher floors are less likely to receive damage.
  • If you are instructed by local authorities, turn off all utilities at the main power switch and close the main gas valve. In some areas, local authorities may advise you to turn off utilities to prevent further damage to homes and the community.
  • Get your preassembled disaster supplies ready. You may need to act quickly. Having your supplies ready will save time.
  • Fill your car's gas tank, in case an evacuation notice is issued. If electric power is cut off, gas stations may not be able to operate pumps for several days.
  • Be prepared to evacuate. Local officials may ask you to leave if they truly feel your home is at risk from flood waters.
  • What to Do During a Flood WARNING

    When a flood or flash flood WARNING is issued:

  • Listen continuously to a NOAA Weather Radio, or a portable, battery-powered radio (or television) for updated emergency information. Local stations provide you with the best advice for your particular situation.
  • Be alert to signs of flooding. A WARNING means a flood is imminent or is happening in the area.
  • If you live in a flood-prone area or think you are at risk, evacuate immediately. Move quickly to higher ground. Save yourself, not your belongings. The most important thing is your safety.
  • Follow the instructions and advice of local authorities. Local authorities are the most informed about affected areas. They will best be able to tell you areas to avoid.
  • If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Move to a safe area before access is cut off by flood water. Evacuation is much simpler and safer before flood waters become too deep for vehicles to drive through.
  • Follow recommended evacuation routes. Shortcuts or alternate, nonrecommended routes may be blocked or damaged by flood waters.
  • Leave early enough to avoid being marooned by flooded roads. Delaying too long may allow all escape routes to become blocked.
  • Flood Safety

  • Stay out of areas subject to flooding. Dips, low spots, canyons, washes, etc., can become filled with water.
  • If outdoors, climb to high ground and stay there. Move away from dangerous flood waters.
  • If you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around, and go another way. Never try to walk, swim, or drive through such swift water. Most flood fatalities are caused by people attempting to drive through water, or people playing in high water. If it is moving swiftly, even water six inches deep can sweep you off your feet.
  • What to Do if Your Are Driving During a Flood

  • Avoid already flooded areas, and areas subject to sudden flooding. Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. Most flood fatalities are caused by people attempting to drive through water, or people playing in high water. The depth of water is not always obvious. The roadbed may be washed out under the water, and you could be stranded or trapped. Rapidly rising water may stall the engine, engulf the vehicle and its occupants, and sweep them away. Look out for flooding at highway dips, bridges, and low areas. Two feet of water will carry away most automobiles.
  • If you are driving and come upon rapidly rising waters, turn around and find another route. Move to higher ground away from rivers, streams, creeks, and storm drains. If your route is blocked by flood waters or barricades, find another route. Barricades are put up by local officials to protect people from unsafe roads. Driving around them can be a serious risk.
  • If your vehicle becomes surrounded by water or the engine stalls, and if you can safely get out, abandon your vehicle immediately and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles. When a vehicle stalls in the water, the water's momentum is transferred to the car. The lateral force of a foot of water moving at 10 miles per hour is about 500 pounds on the average automobile. The greatest effect is buoyancy - for every foot that water rises up the side of a car, it displaces 1,500 pounds of the car's weight. So, two feet of water moving at 10 miles per hour will float virtually any car. Many persons have been swept away by flood waters upon leaving their vehicles, which are later found without much damage. Use caution when abandoning your vehicle, and look for an opportunity to move away quickly and safely to higher ground.
  • What to Do After a Flood or Flash Flood

      • Seek necessary medical care at the nearest hospital or clinic. Contaminated flood waters lead to a greater possibility of infection. Severe injuries will require medical attention.
      • Help a neighbor who may require special assistance - infants, elderly people, and people with disabilities. Elderly people and people with disabilities may require additional assistance. People who care for them or who have large families may need additional assistance in emergency situations.
      • Avoid disaster areas. Your presence might hamper rescue and other emergency operations, and put you at further risk from the residual effects of floods, such as contaminated waters, crumbled roads, landslides, mudflows, and other hazards.
      • Continue to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or local radio or television stations and return home only when authorities indicate it is safe to do so. Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede; there may be flood-related hazards within your community, which you could hear about from local broadcasts.
      • Stay out of any building if flood waters remain around the building. Flood waters often undermine foundations, causing sinking, floors can crack or break and buildings can collapse.
      • Avoid entering ANY building (home, business, or other) before local officials have said it is safe to do so. Buildings may have hidden damage that makes them unsafe. Gas leaks or electric or waterline damage can create additional problems.
      • Report broken utility lines to the appropriate authorities. Reporting potential hazards will get the utilities turned off as quickly as possible, preventing further hazard and injury. Check with your utility company now about where broken lines should be reported.
      • Avoid smoking inside buildings. Smoking in confined areas can cause fires.

    When entering buildings, use extreme caution. Building damage may have occurred where you least expect it. Watch carefully every step you take.

    • Wear sturdy shoes. The most common injury following a disaster is cut feet.
    • Use battery-powered lanterns or flashlights when examining buildings. Battery-powered lighting is the safest and easiest, preventing fire hazard for the user, occupants, and building.
    • Examine walls, floors, doors, staircases, and windows to make sure that the building is not in danger of collapsing.
    • Inspect foundations for cracks or other damage. Cracks and damage to a foundation can render a building uninhabitable.
    • Look for fire hazards. There may be broken or leaking gas lines, flooded electrical circuits, or submerged furnaces or electrical appliances. Flammable or explosive materials may travel from upstream. Fire is the most frequent hazard following floods.
    • Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can and call the gas company from a neighbor's home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.
    • Look for electrical system damage. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell burning insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician first for advice. Electrical equipment should be checked and dried before being returned to service.
    • Check for sewage and waterline damage. If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid using the toilets and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid using water from the tap. You can obtain safe water from undamaged water heaters or by melting ice cubes.
    • Watch out for animals, especially poisonous snakes, that may have come into buildings with the flood waters. Use a stick to poke through debris. Flood waters flush snakes and many animals out of their homes.
    • Watch for loose plaster, drywall, and ceilings that could fall.
    • Take pictures of the damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance claims.

    After returning home:

  • Throw away food that has come in contact with flood waters. Some canned foods may be salvageable. If the cans are dented or damaged, throw them away. Food contaminated by flood waters can cause severe infections.
  • If water is of questionable purity, boil or add bleach, and distill drinking water before using. (See information on water treatment under the "Disaster Supplies Kit" section.) Wells inundated by flood waters should be pumped out and the water tested for purity before drinking. If in doubt, call your local public health authority. Ill health effects often occur when people drink water contaminated with bacteria and germs.
  • Pump out flooded basements gradually (about one-third of the water per day) to avoid structural damage. If the water is pumped completely in a short period of time, pressure from water- saturated soil on the outside could cause basement walls to collapse.
  • Service damaged septic tanks, cesspools, pits, and leaching systems as soon as possible. Damaged sewage systems are health hazards
  • Types of Water Damage

    7/2/2018 (Permalink)

    Types of Water Damage and Common Causes

    Type depends on the source and extent to which it has affected the home. Sources can range from clean water from a burst pipe to black water from sewage backup. Cleanup ranges from $3.75 to $7.00 per square foot. Repairs range from $450 to $7,000. Again, these vary widely depending on the source and extent of damage, whether it's a flooded basement, leaky toilet, or damaged roof.Though a competent DIY homeowner may be able to clean up and repair some damage, it's important to have a professional assess it first to determine the extent and any underlying conditions. Missing even a small amount ? or its causes ? can lead to costlier repairs later. Even small quantities of moisture may result in mold growth. Plus, undiagnosed causes will lead to recurrences. For instance, fixing a damaged ceiling but not the leaky roof that caused it will only lead to another wrecked ceiling.

    Ceiling and Roof - $800

    Nationally, the average cost to repair a roof is about $800. Diagnosing a leaky roof is best left to professionals. Improperly repairing or installing a roof can lead to more issues. Sometimes, an insurance company may require a professional inspection. The most common causes of leaky roofs are:
    • Missing shingles ? that often come off due to high winds.
    • Damaged flashing ? around pipes, chimneys, skylights, and in valleys.
    • Ice dams ? snow melts and refreezes building dams on the roof, causing standing water.
    • Roofs with low slopes and inadequate runoff.

    Basement Damage and Flooding -$1,500

    Moisture damage in your basement happens for a wide range of reasons including flooding, drainage issues, clogged gutters, burst pipes, and sewage backups. Repair costs vary widely depending on the cause and extent of the destruction.For instance, it will be less expensive to restore a basement with an inch of clean water from a burst pipe than to tackle a fix caused by three feet of sewage backup. An inch of clean water would start at around $500 to $1500 to pump out and thoroughly dry it. However, the price of basement drainage repairs can increase up to $10,000 or more depending on the size of the space and the extent of the damage. Budget more when your space has been hit from contaminated sources, like a river flood.

    Drywall - $500

    Drywall repair cost about $500 on average with a typical range of $250 - $750, but can cost much more or less depending on the destruction. It is used in most modern homes and is found in almost all finished areas of a house, including bathrooms. When it becomes wet, it typically needs to be replaced. Not only is the drywall itself ruined, but the wet paper backer of the drywall becomes an excellent environment for mold growth. 

    Floors and Hardwood -$350

    Flooring repairs typically range between $200 to $500. The type of flooring and the length of time water sits affects the costs of removal and repair. Some types of flooring are more permeable than others. For example, laminates and carpet soak up liquids and degrade the subfloor quickly, whereas hardwood can sit underwater for short periods with little damage. Most tile products are either impervious to liquids or can be cleaned and dried with little or no damage, though the area may need grout work.

    Broken or Leaky Bathroom Fixtures -$3,000

    A leaky faucet, cracked bathtub, or failing toilet can easily become a much larger and costlier problem. A 120-square foot bathroom can cost as much as $3,000 to clean up and repair. Homeowners spend an average of about $300 when hiring a plumbers, but can save thousands in future expenses. More importantly, homeowners insurance typically does not cover damage due to ignored maintenance issues.

    Burst Pipes and Leaky Plumbing - $1,000

    Among the most common and most preventable causes of water damage are burst pipes. Burst pipes typically happen because of clogs and freezing. Prevent the damage by finding a family plumber to do annual inspections. Regular inspections and maintenance are a cost-effective, preventative measure. Installing new plumbing typically runs between $350 to $2,000.

    Natural Causes

    Hurricanes and river flooding are common natural causes, as are high water tables and improperly graded ground. Installing a sump pump and water alarm are sensible preventions in areas with high water tables. The sump pump will pump water from under the foundation to drain it away from the home and averages about $1,200 to install. The sump pump itself will cost between $50 to $400. Also, ground that slopes towards the basement of the home can lead to leakage in the basement and increased stress on sewage. 

    Category and Class of Water Damage

    Each incident of damage falls into a category and a class. Category determines the source and how clean it is. Classification determines the severity of the damage itself. Only a licensed professional can categorize and classify water damage. These factors primarily determine the cost of cleanup and removal of damage to a home.Even a competent Dryer should have a qualified professional assess the damage first ? making sure no part of the cleanup is missed. Before doing anything, check with your insurance company ? they may require a licensed assessment. Don't wait. As soon as you detect any damage, call a professional. With time, each class and category quickly degrades into something worse.Removing any moisture and cleaning up (not necessarily repairs) are key to keeping your budget to a minimum. Water damage remediation and repair services can save up to 40% if done quickly.

    Category 1: Clean Water - $3.75 sq. ft.

    This type poses no threat to health. However, it can degrade to a Category 2 if not dealt with quickly. It often comes from drinking sources, such as:
    • Leaky faucets ? also the pipes and fittings under the sink, which can go unnoticed for long periods of time.
    • Leaky toilet tanks ? without cleaning agents like bleach or bromine pucks.
    • Rain and sprinklers ? coming through an open window or leaky roof.
    • Burst pipes ? though this often leads to a higher-class due to the amount of water.
    • Water Heaters ? The average heater lasts 8 to 12 years.
    You'll spend about $3.75 per square foot to dry clean water. However, this is only a starting point. Repairs will depend on the types of materials involved. For example, carpets vary from $1 to $11 per square foot. Quick cleaning can keep fixes to a minimum.

    Category 2: Grey Water - $4.50 sq. ft.

    This type of floodwater poses some health threat. It may contain harmful contaminants such as detergents which may cause minor illness. If not treated, it can quickly degrade to a serious threat due to the growth of mold and bacteria.Common causes of grey water flooding:
    • Overflowing dishwashers and washing machines ? Contains soaps and detergents. Special care should be taken to remove staining or bleaching detergents from carpets.
    • Toilets containing urine or cleaning agents. ? this does not include sewage backup or feces.
    Grey water is only slightly more expensive to clean up averaging $4.50 per square foot. Again, this is only for cleanup; repairs will vary based on damage class.

    Category 3: Black Water - $7.00 sq. ft.

    This category contains contaminants that will cause serious health issues and possibly death. Only professionals should handle most large-scale black water accidents such as flooding. Some cleanup, like a backed-up toilet, can be handled by competent homeowners. This type of cleanup and repair is usually the most expensive, often requiring specialized equipment used by qualified mold and chemical remediation crews. It will often require replacement ? not cleaning ? of the affected home materials.Common causes of black water flooding:
    • Sewage backups ? from drains and septic systems.
    • Flooding ? usually from overflowing rivers or lakes, or from contaminated groundwater.
    • Storm surges ? often causing secondary flooding from streams and groundwater.
    The average homeowner spends $7.00 per square foot for professional cleanup. That does not include the amounts for repairing and replacing items. Typically, anything that can absorb the contaminants in black water should be replaced, including upholstered furniture, beds, carpets, clothing, and all permeable building materials. Replacement is often more cost effective than restoration. 

    Mold - $2,300

    On average, it costs around $2,300 for mold removal. Mold spores are found in almost all environments and begin growing in just 24 to 48 hours when moisture is present. All types of water damage come with a risk of fungal growth. The longer moisture sits, the greater the risk and cost of removal. Only a qualified inspector should test for mold. An inspector can help determine if there is any and if professional remediation is needed.

    Preventing Water Damage

    There are just as many preventions as there are causes. Being proactive in preventing water damage is usually less expensive than repairing damage after it happens.Keep the basement dry as it's the most common place to find damage. Flooding, burst pipes, and even clogged gutters can cause leaks. Pitching the landscape, cleaning the gutters, and installing downspout extensions are simple outdoor fixes. From the inside, install a sump pump and water alarm. Have the basement inspected for waterproofing ? or have some installed.Cleaning a gutter and sloping the landscape can be a free, DIY activity if the necessary tools are available. Downspout extensions can cost as little as $50, depending on how many are needed. The savings are incredible considering basement cleanup and repairs can run upwards of $10,000. One of the simplest proactive steps is getting an annual plumbing inspection. These are often free or free with other services. The plumber will inspect all visible plumbing including fixtures, pipes, appliances, and drains. They diagnose and fix small problems before they become big ones. They can also tell you the best time to replace worn fixtures and appliances. InsuranceDoes insurance cover the damage? Check your policy or call the insurance company to find out. Put that smartphone to work by taking pictures and video of the damage. Properly documenting the incident will make the claims process easier. Also, be sure to check with a pro to see if they do insurance claim management.Part of a comprehensive water damage prevention plan includes knowing what insurance covers and what it doesn't. Most plans cover sudden and accidental damage like a water heater failing or a dishwasher overflowing. However, they usually don?t include flooding, sewage backups, and known maintenance issues like a continuously leaky faucet.

    Floors and Water Damage

    8/18/2017 (Permalink)

    Finishes: Floor finishes such as wax, polymer and polyurethane, affect porosity and slow the rate of absorption and desorption.  

    Extent of damage: Wood flooring cups when moisture is absorbed at the unfinished sides and bottom of planks to swell and rise above the centers. If cupped planks are sanded flat before the wood is dried to acceptable MC, then, as planks continue to dry the sanded edges will continue to shrink downward, causing them to be lower than the centers of the planks. this is called crowning. Consider the condition presented and implement appropriate surface or subsurface drying procedures.

    Replacement Criteria: Not all wood flooring can be restored to a pre-determined drying goal once moisture penetrates into and underneath the material. Parquet or engineered flooring that is buckled or broken can generally not be restored by drying and is replaced.

    Drying Criteria:It is recommended when drying wood that the humidity reaches about 30-45 percent as quickly as possible. Of equal importance is increasing airflow to the flooring surfaces and sub-surfaces as quickly as possible.

    Expiditing Drying: When flooring materials are saturated, moisture should be evaporated from accessible surfaces, both top and bottom. Finishes serving as vapor retardant barriers inhibit drying considerably. Therefore, it may be necessary to remove finishes to increase the rate of evaporation. When drying is complete , salvageable flooring is refinished in accordance with customer specifications  

    Dos and Don't of Flood Damage

    8/10/2017 (Permalink)

    What To Do After Flooding

    • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
    • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
    • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
    • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
    • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
    • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
    • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
    • Gather loose items from floors.

    What NOT To Do After Flooding

    • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
    • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
    • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
    • Don't use television or other household appliances.
    • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.

    Type of Water

    8/10/2017 (Permalink)

    The three types of contaminated water:

    Category 1: "Clean Water"

    Category 1 water is from a clean source like a broken water supply line or leaking faucet. If not treated quickly, this water can turn into category 2 or 3, depending on length of time, temperature, and contact with surrounding contaminants.

    • Water from a clean source like a broken water line
    • If left untreated, can degrade into category 2 or 3

    Category 2: "Gray Water"

    Category 2 water is contaminated and could cause discomfort or illness. Examples include washing machine overflow; toilet overflow with some urine, but no feces; or dishwasher overflow.

    • May contain bacteria and viruses
    • Can quickly degrade into category 3 if left untreated

    Category 3: "Black Water"

    Category 3 water is grossly contaminated and could cause severe illness or death if ingested and any contact should be avoided. Examples include flooding from rivers or streams, water from beyond the toilet trap, water from the toilet bowl with feces, or standing water that has begun to support microbial growth.

    • May contain untreated sewage, harsh chemicals, and microbes
    • Water from flooding rivers or sewer backup

    RETURNING HOME AFTER A DISASTER

    8/7/2017 (Permalink)

    Cleaning up after a disaster can be a long and strenuous procedure. Depending on the kind and amount of damage your property sustains, you should seek professional assistance. The professionals at SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo are here to assist you 24/7.

    Follow these helpful tips:

    • Before going inside, walk carefully around the outside of your home and check for loose power lines, gas leaks and structural damage.
    • Do not enter if floodwaters remain around the building.
    • If you have any doubts about the safety, have your home inspected by a professional before entering.
    • Wear sturdy work boots and gloves. Enter the building carefully and check for damage.
    • Watch out for animals.
    • Use a stick to poke through debris. Check for cracks in the roof, foundation, and chimneys.
    • If it looks like the building may collapse, leave immediately.
    • Be aware of loose boards and slippery floors.
    • Keep a battery-powered flashlight for lights on hand. Do not use oil, gas lanterns, candles or torches. Leaking gas or other flammable materials may be present. Do not smoke.
    • Check for gas leaks, starting at the hot water heater. If you smell gas or hear a hissing or blowing sound, open a window and leave immediately. Turn off the main gas valve from the outside if you can. Call the gas company from a neighbor's house.
    • If you shut off the gas supply at the main valve, you will need a professional to turn it back on. Do not turn on the lights until you're sure they are safe to use.
    • Check electrical system. If you see sparks, broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker, even if the power is off in your neighborhood. Do not touch the fuse box, a circuit breaker, or anything else electrical if you are wet or standing in water.
    • Check appliances. If they are wet, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker, then unplug the appliances and let them dry out. Have them checked by a professional before using them again.
    • Check water and sewage systems. If pipes are damaged, turn off the main water valve. Verify the safety of the water with local authorities before using it. If you have a well, it should be pumped out and the water tested by authorities before drinking.
    • Clean up spilled medicines, bleaches and gasoline. Open cabinets carefully. Be aware of objects that may fall.
    • Throw out fresh food that has come into contact with floodwaters.
    • Check refrigerated food for spoilage. Throw out flooded cosmetics and medicines.
    • Call your insurance agent as soon as possible. Take pictures of all damages and keep good records of repair and cleaning costs.
    • Call SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo at 586-336-7373

    https://www.stclaircounty.org/Offices/emerg_mngmt/72hours.aspx

    Why Get Flood Insurance

    8/2/2017 (Permalink)

    "Storms are not the only cause of floods. Flooding can be caused by dams or levees breaking, new development changing how water flows above and below ground, snow melt and much more." With all of these probable causes, there is no reason not to renew your flood insurance policy. Having flood insurance can mean the difference between recovery and being financially devastated when an unforeseen accident occurs. In fact according to FEMA just one inch of water damage can cost up to twenty thousand dollars. If you decide to renew your policy you could also be eligible for discounts on the rate of your policy. You will also be able to file a claim even if there is not a Presidential Disaster Declaration. No home is one hundred percent safe from water damage. Don't allow yourself to be caught without insurance to help you in recovering from the loss. And always remember to contact SERVPRO of Marine/City Romeo at (586)-336-7373 when flood damage occurs. 

    IICRC benefit for homeowners dealing with water damage

    7/6/2017 (Permalink)

    Have you ever experienced water damage in your home or business? If so, you know that there are hundreds of companies out there advertising water damage restoration services. So what differentiates SERVPRO from all the rest? 

    Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. With a nationwide system of qualified franchises, no damage is too large or too small for SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo.

    We pride ourselves on our knowledge, experience and continued education. So what does it mean to be IICRC certified? Who is the IICRC? The IICRC is a nonprofit certification and Standards Developing Organization (SDO) for the inspection, cleaning and restoration industries. The IICRC is recognized internationally as a knowledgeable industry voice and resource. The IICRC has led the way in establishing the main industry standards and reference guides for professional carpet cleaning, upholstery and fabric cleaning, water damage restoration and mold remediation. Each IICRC standard takes years to develop along with the coordination of experts in the field.

    If you or someone you know experiences water damage in their home or business now you know who you can call. SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is here to help 24/7. We can be reached at (586) 336-7373.

    Water Damage Causes Many Problems

    6/7/2017 (Permalink)

    Unforeseen Damage From Water

    Marine City homeowners know that water damage can be especially troublesome. Water flows in almost every direction, and can even seep uphill when there is an absorbent material that facilitates this movement. Where water can flow to, damage can be found.

    When water makes contact with metal, rusting can start taking place. Outlets, being near the floor, are often impacted this way by flooding. If the metal is part of an electrical system, this can lead to problems with electrical shock or even fire. Both can be deadly and need to be prevented by replacing anything affected. Other metal items in your home might be door hinges, screen doors, drawer tracks, cabinetry knobs and handles, and much more.

    In situations where water has seeped into a home from a leaky roof or other reason, water can discolor walls and ceilings, and cause plaster to crumble and pose choking hazards to younger children and toddlers. Pests that may have been present but largely unnoticed within the walls or attic can find their way into your living space. While their presence means they are no longer hidden and can now be dealt with, having them around your family is not healthy.

    Carpeting, upholstery and longer drapes can also become damaged. Affected textiles become weak and brittle. High levels of humidity can bring this on, and often the culprit is an absence of a dehumidifier. Other ways that increased humidity might happen are poor or incorrect venting of the clothes dryer or the bathroom fan.

    The first step to mitigating any amount of damage is discovering the source of the excess water. Flooding does not need to be present for a home to have water damage. Contact your local experts who can assist you every step of the way. SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is available 24/7 at (586) 336-7373.

    Water Damage Emergency Tips

    6/6/2016 (Permalink)

    Water damage emergency tips. What to do until help arrives.

    WATER DAMAGE EMERGENCY TIPS

    What you can do until help arrives

    After any water damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

    • Is it safe to stay in the house?
    • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
    • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
    • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

    With over 1,650 Franchises nationwide, there’s a SERVPRO Professional nearby and ready to serve you.

    What To Do After Flooding

    • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting.
    • Wipe excess water from wood furniture after removal of lamps and tabletop items.
    • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
    • Place aluminum foil or wood blocks between furniture legs and wet carpeting.
    • Turn air conditioning on for maximum drying in summer.
    • Remove colored rugs from wet carpeting.
    • Remove art objects to a safe, dry place.
    • Gather loose items from floors.

    What NOT To Do After Flooding

    • Don't leave wet fabrics in place. Hang furs and leather goods.
    • Don't leave books, magazines or other colored items on wet carpet or floors.
    • Don't use your household vacuum to remove water.
    • Don't use television or other household appliances.
    • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet, and keep out of rooms where ceilings are sagging.