Recent Storm Damage Posts

Storms and insurance

9/2/2021 (Permalink)

As a leader in fire and water cleanup and restoration, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals offer your insurance company an array of competitive advantages. Our goal is to restore both your customer’s property and their peace of mind through timely mitigation and adherence to IICRC standards. The result? Lower claims costs and satisfied customers – and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Why Choose SERVPRO: The SERVPRO Difference - SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are uniquely qualified to keep claims costs down while still providing the best services possible for your customers.

Large Loss Response: No Restoration Project Is Too Large Whether it’s a large commercial project or a major storm event, the SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team can provide help quickly.

Training: From initial training at SERVPRO's Corporate Training Facility to IICRC certifications, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are highly trained in property damage restoration.

Call SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo Today: 586-336-7373 From initial training at SERVPRO's Corporate Training Facility to IICRC certifications, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are highly trained in property damage restoration.

Stay Safe Before and After Winter Storms

8/3/2021 (Permalink)

Stay Safe Before and After Winter Storms

Heat your home safely.

If you plan to use a wood stove, fireplace, or space heater, be extremely careful. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and remember these safety tips:

  • Turning on the stove for heat is not safe; have at least one of the following heat sources in case the power goes out:
    • Extra blankets, sleeping bags, and warm winter coats
    • Fireplace that is up to code with plenty of dry firewood or a gas log fireplace
    • Portable space heaters or kerosene heaters. Check with your local fire department to make sure that kerosene heaters are legal in your area.
  • Use electric space heaters with automatic shut-off switches and non-glowing elements. Make sure to keep them away from any flammable materials, like curtains or blankets.
  • Use fireplaces, wood stoves, or other combustion heaters only if they are properly vented to the outside and do not leak gas from the flue or exhaust into the indoor air space.
  • Have your heating system serviced by a qualified technician every year.
  • Do not burn paper in a fireplace.
  • Make sure you have proper ventilation if you must use a kerosene heater.
  • Use only the type of fuel your heater is designed to use—don’t substitute.
  • Keep heat sources, like space heaters, at least 3 feet away from drapes, furniture, or bedding. Never cover your space heater.
  • Never place a space heater on top of furniture or near water.
  • Never leave children unattended near a space heater.
  • Make sure that the cord of an electric space heater is not a tripping hazard, but do not run the cord under carpets or rugs.
  • Avoid using extension cords to plug in your space heater.
  • If your space heater has a damaged electrical cord or produces sparks, do not use it.

Winter Storm Preparation Cleanup and Restoration

8/3/2021 (Permalink)

Winter Storm Cleanup and Restoration

Cold weather, snow, and ice storms can cause severe damage to your home or business. When these types of disasters strike, immediate action is necessary to prevent additional damage to your property. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals have the winter storm experience, expertise, and the resources to remediate damage caused by winter weather.

Frozen Pipes

Extreme cold weather can cause pipes to freeze and burst. In general, pipes are more likely to freeze when the temperature is below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. The resulting water damage can be extensive. Outdoor pipes and pipes in unheated areas of the home can freeze if they are not properly insulated or if temperatures are severely cold. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals can quickly and safely repair water damage caused by frozen pipes.

Outdoor pipes most likely to freeze include:

  • Outdoor hose bibs
  • Swimming pool supply lines
  • Water sprinkler lines

Pipes in unheated or partially heated areas are also at risk of freezing, including:

  • Basements
  • Crawl spaces
  • Garages

Ice Dams

An ice dam is formed when snow melts unevenly on a roof and refreezes into a dam at the edge of the roof, near the eaves. This dam prevents any further snowmelt from draining off of the roof. This standing water can back up under shingles, leak into a home, and cause significant water damage to ceilings, walls, and other areas. Ice dams can also tear off gutters and loosen shingles.

Roof Damage

Snow and ice can cause significant damage to your gutters and roof. The additional weight of snow and ice can even cause a roof to collapse. When there’s a cold snap, water can get into cracks and small spaces and expand when it freezes, causing larger cracks and more damage. The repetition of freezing and thawing cycles can cause small cracks to get larger.

Storm Damage

8/2/2021 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Restoration

Storms and inclement weather can bring wind damage, heavy rain, and flooding that can devastate any business in a matter of minutes. There’s never a convenient time for flooding or water damage to strike, and storms don’t just strike during regular business hours; that’s why SERVPRO Franchise Professionals offer 24 hour emergency service 365 days per year.

Every hour spent cleaning up is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. So when an emergency situation arises in your business, give our Professionals a call and they’ll be there fast with the help you need.

Disaster Recovery Team: The SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team can provide help whether it’s a tornado, hurricane, blizzard or flood. The SERVPRO System has a network of strategically positioned storm teams on standby should a disaster strike near you. Available 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are prepared for the unpredictable. Learn more about the Disaster Recovery Team:   https://www.SERVPRO.com/disaster-recovery https://www.SERVPRO.com/disaster-recovery

24 Hour Emergency Service

7/20/2021 (Permalink)

Flooding and water emergencies don’t wait for regular business hours and neither do we. SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo Professionals provide emergency water restoration services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week—including all holidays. You can expect an immediate response time, day or night. 586-336-7373

A Fast Response is Crucial: In many cleaning and restoration situations, immediate action is needed. With over 1,700 U.S. and Canadian Franchise locations, SERVPRO is strategically positioned to be faster to any size emergency.

An immediate response helps to minimize the damage and the cleaning and restoration costs.

Water is particularly invasive, quickly spreading throughout your property and being absorbed into floors, walls, furniture, etc. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals arrive quickly and start the water extraction process almost immediately.

WATER DAMAGE TIMELINE:

Within Minutes:

  • Water quickly spreads throughout your property, saturating everything in its path.
  • Water is absorbed into walls, floors, upholstery, and belongings.
  • Furniture finishes may bleed, causing permanent staining on carpets.
  • Photographs, books, and other paper goods start to swell and warp.

Hours 1 - 24:

  • Drywall begins to swell and break down.
  • Metal surfaces begin to tarnish.
  • Furniture begins to swell and crack.
  • Dyes and inks from cloth and paper goods spread and stain.
  • A musty odor appears.

48 Hours to 1 Week:

  • Mold and mildew may grow and spread.
  • Doors, windows, and studs swell and warp.
  • Metal begins to rust and corrode.
  • Furniture warps and shows signs of mold.
  • Paint begins to blister.
  • Wood flooring swells and warps.
  • Serious biohazard contamination is possible.

More Than 1 Week:

  • Restoration time and cost increase dramatically; replacing contaminated materials and structural rebuilding may be extensive.
  • Structural safety, mold growth, and biohazard contaminants pose serious risks to occupants.

Storm Damage Cleanup and Restoration

7/19/2021 (Permalink)

Storm and flood damage can be devastating. Immediate action is needed, and you need the company with storm damage experience. SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo Professionals have the expertise and the resources to handle any size disaster and can respond immediately to storm and flooding conditions. 586-336-7373

Regardless of the storm damage, SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo can help.

Flooding.         

Tornadoes.

Ice and Snowstorms.

Fires.

We are here for you every day, all day 365 days a year.

586-336-7373

Storm Damage

7/19/2021 (Permalink)

Storms and inclement weather can bring wind damage, heavy rain, and flooding that can devastate any business in a matter of minutes. There’s never a convenient time for flooding or water damage to strike, and storms don’t just strike during regular business hours; that’s why SERVPRO Franchise Professionals offer 24 hour emergency service 365 days per year.

Every hour spent cleaning up is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. So when an emergency situation arises in your business, give our Professionals a call and they’ll be there fast with the help you need.

Disaster Recovery Team: The SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team can provide help whether it’s a tornado, hurricane, blizzard or flood. The SERVPRO System has a network of strategically positioned storm teams on standby should a disaster strike near you. Available 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are prepared for the unpredictable. 

Frozen Pipes

12/14/2020 (Permalink)

HOW TO PREVENT WATER PIPES FROM FREEZING, AND HOW TO THAW THEM IF THEY DO FREEZE.

Why Pipe Freezing is a Problem

Water has a unique property in it that expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the strength of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break.

Pipes that freeze most frequently are:

  • Pipes that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, and water sprinkler lines.
  • Water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets.
  • Pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation.

How to Protect Pipes from Freezing

Before the onset of cold weather, protect your pipes from freezing by following these recommendations:

  • Drain water from swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.
  • Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.
  • Add insulation to attics, basements and crawl spaces. Insulation will maintain higher temperatures in these areas.
  • Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located in unheated areas. Look in the garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.
  • Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Newspaper can provide some degree of insulation and protection to exposed pipes – even ¼” of newspaper can provide significant protection in areas that usually do not have frequent or prolonged temperatures below freezing.
  • Consider relocating exposed pipes to provide increased protection from freezing.

How to Prevent Frozen Pipes

  • Keep garage doors closed if there are water supply lines in the garage.
  • Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.
  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing.
  • Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.
  • If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.

How to Thaw Frozen Pipes

  • If you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Likely places for frozen pipes include against exterior walls or where your water service enters your home through the foundation.
  • Keep the faucet open. As you treat the frozen pipe and the frozen area begins to melt, water will begin to flow through the frozen area. Running water through the pipe will help melt ice in the pipe.
  • Apply heat to the section of pipe using an electric heating pad wrapped around the pipe, an electric hair dryer, a portable space heater (kept away from flammable materials), or by wrapping pipes with towels soaked in hot water. Do not use a blowtorch, kerosene or propane heater, charcoal stove, or other open flame device.
  • Apply heat until full water pressure is restored. If you are unable to locate the frozen area, if the frozen area is not accessible, or if you cannot thaw the pipe, call a licensed plumber.
  • Check all other faucets in your home to find out if you have additional frozen pipes. If one pipe freezes, others may freeze, too.

How To Prepare Your Home For A Blizzard

11/5/2020 (Permalink)

How to Prepare Your Home for a Blizzard or Extreme Cold

  1. Stock Up on Food & Water: Winter storms and blizzards sometimes make travel impossible, and during a winter weather event, most city officials ask people to stay off the road. So you need to have plenty of nonperishable food and water on hand, ideally in a long term food pantry, so there’s no need for you to drive on dangerous roads. A food pantry also ensures you have the foods you like to eat instead of worrying about facing empty store shelves picked over by panicked shoppers.

It can get expensive to start a long-term food pantry from scratch, but it doesn’t have to. If you start now, picking up a bit of extra nonperishable food each week when it’s on sale, it won’t make much of a difference in your food budget.

Some foods to stock up on:

Rice

Dried beans, lentils, or peas

Trail mix bars, protein bars, granola bars, or fruit bars

Canned vegetables, soups, and fruit

Peanut butter and jelly

Tea, coffee, and hot chocolate

Powdered drink mixes

Dried pasta

Instant soup mixes

Sugar

Pickled vegetables

Trail mix

Beef jerky

Applesauce

Instant oatmeal

Sweets like cookies, candy bars, and chocolate

Evaporated or condensed milk

Nuts and dried fruits like mango, apples, apricots, and strawberries

Oils like olive oil, vegetable oil, and coconut oil

Whole-grain crackers

Shelf-stable milk, tea, and hot cocoa

Waffle and pancake mix

Breakfast cereal, including hot cereals like Cream of Wheat

Vegetable, chicken, beef, and bouillon cubes

Packaged foods, including macaroni and cheese and instant potatoes

Canned meats, including tuna, sardines, oysters, chicken, turkey, pork, sausage, and Spam

Formula or baby food if you have very young children

Pet food if you have pets

You also need plenty of fresh water, especially if your pipes freeze during a cold snap. Each person in your home needs at least 1 gallon per day for drinking and sanitation. And don’t forget to have extra on hand for pets. If you have a wood stove, you can always melt snow, providing you have plenty of firewood, but you must also prepare for snowless cold weather.

  1. Consider Cooking & Easy Food Prep

If you were to lose power during a winter storm, do you have a way to cook food and clean up? If you have an electric stove in your kitchen, it’s not going to work when the power goes out, so you need a backup way to heat water and cook. A small camp stove, camping gas stove, It is inexpensive and easy to operate. Just make sure you use gas-powered stoves in the garage – with the garage door open – to avoid carbon monoxide buildup in your home. if you have a propane grill, you can use it to cook food during a power outage too.

  1. Stock Up on Supplies

Having plenty of food in your pantry is an essential first step. But you also need personal care products and handy necessities, such as:

  • A manual can opener
  • Diapers
  • Toilet paper
  • Moist towelettes
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste
  • Feminine care products
  • Paper towels, paper plates, and disposable silverware
  • Dish soap
  • An emergency phone charger
  • Candles
  • Batteries
  • Bleach or other disinfectant
  • Laundry detergent

In addition to having plenty of supplies around for your family, if you have room, stock up on extra in case your neighbors or extended family members aren’t prepared.

Last, if you’re on any medications, talk to your doctor about how long it’s safe to store them for an emergency.

  1. Purchase an Emergency Sump Pump

Consider this scenario: A lot of snow has fallen in your area, and you’ve lost power. Thankfully, the weather has started to warm back up, and the snow is melting. However, the power company hasn’t been able to turn the lights back on. If you have a basement that means your sump pump doesn’t have any power to work right when it’s needed most.

A battery operated sump pump will kick on and pump for hours or days when the power is off, keeping water out of your basement. And this is a time when it pays to spend more on a quality product.

You’ll also need to buy a battery in addition to the pump itself. Most reviewers on Amazon recommend getting a Deep cycle marine battery. While these are more expensive, they last much longer than an auto battery.

  1. Consider Portable Power

 The power often goes out during winter storms, and even extreme cold weather events can cause power outages due to increased demand.

IS YOUR HOME READY FOR THE MICHIGAN WINTER?

9/21/2020 (Permalink)

IS YOUR HOME READY FOR THE MICHIGAN WINTER?

Prepare your home:

  • Make sure your home is well insulated and that you have weather stripping around your doors and window sills to keep the warm air inside.
  • Make sure you have a working carbon monoxide detector.
  • Keep fire extinguishers on hand, and make sure everyone in your house knows how to use them. House fires pose an additional risk, as more people turn to alternate heating sources without taking the necessary safety precautions.
  • Insulate your home by installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic from the inside to keep cold air out.
  • If you have a wood burning fireplace, consider storing wood to keep you warm if winter weather knocks out your heat. Also, make sure you have your chimney cleaned and inspected every year.

Have at least one of the following heat sources in case the power goes out:

  • Extra blankets, sleeping bags, and warm winter coats
  • Fireplace or wood-burning stove with plenty of dry firewood, or a gas log fireplace.

Michigan winter and extreme cold temperatures also mean homeowners and businesses need to be prepared for frozen pipes.

How to prevent frozen pipes:

There are a number of things, some long-term, some short, that you can do to protect yourself from that bit of winter unpleasantness.

  • Put adequate insulation around pipes that are vulnerable to cold air.
  • Wrap heat tape around such pipes.
  • If practical, use an indoor valve to shut off and drain water supply to outdoor faucets during the winter. This will prevent freezing in a short span of the pipe inside the house from the faucet. At a minimum, disconnect garden hoses from faucets to release accumulated water.
  • Keep water dripping or trickling from faucet farthest from where the water main enters your house. This will keep water moving through most of your plumbing and discourage freezing.
  • If you have pipes that aren’t insulated in an exterior wall near a sink, leave open cabinet doors beneath the sink to let warm air in.
  • If you plan to be away for several days, keep your heat on – not necessarily full blast, but enough to discourage freezing of pipes. Ask a neighbor to make sure the heat is still on.
  • An alternate plan if you’re leaving: shut off the water, drain the water supply by opening a faucet at the lowest point in the house and put antifreeze in the toilet bowl and traps under the sink and tub.

What should I do if my pipes freeze?

If you turn on a faucet and get no water, your pipes may be frozen. If your pipes freeze, there are some procedures that you can follow to thaw them. The sooner the problem is recognized, the better chance that damage will be minimized.

Some techniques for thawing frozen pipes include:

  • If possible, expose a boxed-in area to the inside heat. An example includes opening some ceiling tiles if your home has a drop ceiling.
  • Use a heat gun. However, be extremely careful as the heat from the heat gun will ignite any wood or paper it contacts.
  • DO NOT use torches to thaw pipes!
  • Rubbing the pipes with warm, damp rags may slowly thaw the line.
  • If you do not have water for an extended period of time, special attention should be given to hot water heaters and boilers.

·      Where are my shut off valves?

  • There are actually two major shutoff valves in line with your service. The first valve, called a curb stop, is generally located near the property line and is normally housed by a cylinder with a cap on it called the curb box. The other major valve is located in the home next to the water meter. Other valves may be near plumbing appliances such as sinks and toilets.
  • Keeping your main valve in good working condition will assure you that you will be able to turn your water off in the event of an emergency, in case one of your water pipes breaks, for example. Older style gate valves should be turned periodically due to possible corrosion build-up. Newer Teflon coated ball valves should stay in working order without any regular turning.
  • If for any unforeseen emergency services please don’t hesitate to call SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo at 586-336-7373 24 hours a day 365 days a year.

Ways To Protect Your Home During A Storm

8/26/2020 (Permalink)

1. Clear away outdoor items. Make sure all lawn furniture, gardening tools, sporting equipment, and other outdoor items are stored away if a storm is heading your way.

2. Trim the trees. Take time to examine the trees in your yard. Storms will often snap large tree branches, which can damage your home’s siding, smash your car, or even topple power lines. If a tree has a loose connection with a big branch, consider sawing it off.

3. Install storm shutters. Installing impact resistant shutters or impact resistant glass can prevent your windows from shattering.

4. Have standby power. Electrical lines are vulnerable during storms. Fallen branches can easily snap the power lines, and lightning strikes can blow up transformers causing major power outages. A whole–house surge protective device runs in the $200 to $300 range and is easy for an electrician to install. For extreme weather, consider purchasing a home generator to keep your power on in the event of long–term electricity outages

5. Flood proof your home.Heavy rainstorms can lead to flooding, which can potentially destroy your entire home. If you live in an area of high probability of flooding, there’s a chance your Homeowners insurance won’t cover the repairs, so be sure to check what your policy includes. One preventative option is dry flood – proofing your house by making the foundation watertight with concrete. Another option is wet flood–proofing, which consists of modifying areas under the house, such as basements and crawlspaces, to allow floodwaters to enter and exit.

6. Have plans for where you will go.It’s a good idea to have a plan of where you and your family will go in case you must evacuate the home. Some homes simply aren’t safe to remain in when the weather really gets rough. Once you hear the hurricane warning, prepare a bag with important papers and valuables. Also, always keep water, a first aid kit and other things you might need at hand. After all, you never want to lose sight that your main concern is not your home, it’s the people living in it.

7. Check your house for weakness. According to experts in the field, the force of the wind during a storm can cause weak places in your home to fail. Therefore, it’s important to make sure your house is solid. There are things you can do to help make your home stronger before the next hurricane. Experts advise these four areas to be thoroughly checked – the roof, windows, doors and garage door. (if you have one). It’s better to be over-prepared than under-prepared.

Tornadoes

8/26/2020 (Permalink)

When Tornadoes strike, extremely high winds and flying/falling debris are the primary dangers to your health. Knowing exactly what to do during a tornado can save you and your family's life. After a tornado, there are a number of other potential hazards that can adversely affect your health and well being, such as:

. Physical injuries due to debris (stepping on nails or broken glass, falling structures)

. Fire, electrocution, or explosion due to damaged power lines, gas lines, or electrical equipment.

. Exposure to chemical spills and/or potentially contaminated floodwaters.

. Mold growth from wet or damp conditions.

. Ongoing mental and emotional stress (fear, anxiety) especially in children

How To Prepare: Understand Watches and warnings. 

A Tornado Watch means that tornadoes are  possible. It is important to remain alert for changing weather conditions and approaching storms. Be ready to take shelter immediately.

A Tornado Warning is an urgent announcement that a tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. You should take shelter immediately.

Learn how to take shelter: Flying debris is deadly during a tornado. Where you and your family are when a tornado happens changes the way you need to take shelter.

  • House: Go to the basement or lowest level of your home and avoid windows. Get under sturdy objects like tables or workbenches and cover up with blankets for more protection.
  • Mobile Home: Mobile homes cannot hold up to tornado winds. It is best to find a nearby building you can go to for shelter.
  • Driving: Vehicles are not safe against tornado winds. Never stay in or under a vehicle during a tornado. If a tornado is occurring while you're driving, stop and find a nearby building to take shelter in or seek low-lying ground. Never try to outrun a tornado in your vehicle.
  • Outside: If you cannot get to a sturdy building, find a low-lying area, like a ditch, and cover your head with an object or your arms. Avoid places with trees since they can cause more dangerous debris or fall on top of you.
  • Work/School: Make sure you and your family know the tornado shelter plans at your work and school(s) and that these plans are regularly practiced.
  • Have a plan and supplies ready. Having a plan and supplies in place for you and your family before any emergency happens will make it easier to return to your normal life. Plan ahead of time for you and your family to make sure everyone knows the best place to take cover during a tornado no matter where they are. Come up with meeting places in and out of your neighborhood in case you're separated from loved ones during a disaster. Talking about and writing your plan together will give you the peace of mind that everyone knows what to do in an emergency.

  • How to stay healthy

    Prevent injuries. Be aware that the wreckage from a tornado can create a number of hazardous situations. You should avoid or minimize your exposure to dangerous substances and conditions in and around the damaged area.

    • Always wear protective clothing, gloves and boots during cleanup to protect yourself from nails, broken glass, chemicals that may have spilled, and even flood water, which could be contaminated with chemicals or sewage. Wash your hands with soap and clean water frequently, and seek medical attention for dirty cuts, or deep puncture wounds.
    • Watch out for downed power lines, damaged gas lines, or electrical equipment, which could cause an electrocution, fire, or explosion. Make sure to shut off electrical power and natural gas or propane tanks, but only if you can do so safely.
    • Only use battery-powered flashlights and lanterns rather than candles, gas lanterns or torches to examine your home as there may be flammables inside.
    • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not use portable generators or outdoor grills inside your home or outside next to windows. Carbon monoxide gas is colorless, odorless, and deadly!

    Keep food and water safe. In a disaster, food and water can become contaminated with poisonous chemicals and even sewage, which can cause you and your family to become very sick if consumed. Follow these few rules of thumb before you consume them.

    To keep your food safe:

    • Throw away any food that may have come in contact with flood or storm water. This includes food containers with screw-caps, snap-lids, crimped caps (soda pop bottles), twist caps, flip tops, snap-open, and home canned foods as these types of items cannot be disinfected.
    • Food items in unopened, store-bought cans that may have come in contact with flood or storm water must be washed and disinfected (see instructions below). If a canned good item is bulging, opened or damaged, throw it away, whether it has come in contact with flood water or not.
  • Disinfection Instructions for Canned Goods:

    1. Remove the label and wash the can well with soap and clean water.
    2. Prepare a solution of bleach and water by mixing one capfull of unscented household chlorine bleach into one gallon of water.
    3. Disinfect the can by submerging it into the bleach water for one full minute. Do not rinse the can off. Allow the can to air dry before using it or storing it in a clean, dry place.
    4. Re-label the can with a sharpie or other permanent marker. Don’t forget to include any expiration date that was listed on the original label.

    Throw away any perishable food items in your refrigerator, such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and leftovers, if the power has been out for 4 or hours or more. Throw away any food with an unusual odor, color or texture. When in doubt, throw it out!

    Drinking Water Safety

    • Listen to public announcements or contact your local health department to find out if your tap water is safe.  Until you know your water is safe, use bottled, boiled or disinfected water to wash dishes, brush your teeth, prepare or wash food, wash your hands, make ice or make baby formula! Learn how to boil or disinfect water.

    Clean mold from your home. Mold begins to grow in wet or damp conditions after two days. If you need to clean your home of mold, make sure to wear protective clothing such as long pants, long-sleeved shirts, gloves, rubber boots, and goggles. To keep from breathing in mold, wear an N-95 mask. Do not use dust masks or handkerchiefs as the mold spores can still pass through the tiny holes in the material and get into your lungs. N-95 masks (available at hardware stores) are specially designed to keep very tiny particles, such as mold, from getting through. Make sure the mask fits snugly around your nose and mouth.

Generator Safety Tips

8/26/2020 (Permalink)

10 Tips to Stay Safe when Using a Generator:

  1. Be aware of hazards: Awareness is key to safe generator use. Common hazards include shocks and electrocution from incorrect use, carbon monoxide (CO) from a generator’s exhaust, fires from improper refueling or fuel storage, and noise/vibration hazards.
  2. Proper ventilation is key. According to consumer reports, 50 people die every year from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning related to using a generator improperly. Do not use a gasoline-powered generator less than 15 feet from any window, door or vent, and don’t run a generator in a garage even with the door open.
  3. Purchase a CO detector. Because carbon monoxide is invisible and odorless, CO detectors warn people of dangerous levels.
  4. Stay Grounded. Always follow instructions in the owner’s manual on how to “ground” the generator.
  5. Keep it clear of debris and dry. Clear 3 to 4 feet around the generator to create airflow space to avoid a fire. Never run generators in the rain or when wet. Place the generator either in a dry area or under an open canopy structure.
  6. Avoid electrical hazards. Plug appliances directly into the generator. If you must use an extension cord, it should be 3-pronged, grounded, heavy-duty and labeled for outdoor use.
  7. Organize your cords. To avoid slips, trips and falls, keep cords out of the way but in plain view. Check cords regularly for damage (such as cuts or fraying) that could cause a fire.
  8. Do not “back feed” power by plugging the generator into a wall outlet. Back feeding will put you and others, including utility workers, at serious risk for electrocution and/or electrical fire risk.
  9. Hot. Hot. Even if operated for a short time, generator exteriors can become hot very quickly. If you must touching the generator, wear protective gear. To avoid electric shock or electrocution, do not try to fix or otherwise work on a generator while it is on or plugged in.
  10. Be prepared and aware. Always keep a fully charged fire extinguisher nearby. If you or others show symptoms of CO poisoning – light-headed, dizzy, tiredness or nausea – go outside immediately for fresh air and seek medical attention.

Generator Fuel Storage Reminders:

  • Only use fuel recommended in the owner’s manual.
  • Keep fuel in an ANSI-approved container away from the generator.
  • Store outdoors in a cool, well ventilated space – never indoors.
  • Do not fuel the generator while it’s running.

Hot! Hot! Hot!

7/23/2020 (Permalink)

Summer time in Michigan brings a variety of weather. This year is no different. Dangerously high temperatures have plagued our state for most of July and there is no end in sight. Normally when we think about summer weather dangers we think about thunderstorms, tornadoes, high winds or hail. Most families do not contemplate the dangers of high temperatures or the life threatening dangers they present.

Heat is one of the leading weather related killers according OSHA. According to the CDC during extremely hot and humid weather, like we are currently experiencing in Michigan, your body's ability to cool itself is challenged. Rapidly rising body temperatures put you at risk for a heat related illness. That being said it is important to note a child or pet should never be locked in a car with the windows up. A child can die within 10 minutes. A staggering number of deaths have already been reported in 2020 by the CDC. For more heat related information please check out the National Weather Service's site on heat safety at https://www.weather.gov/safety/heat.

We here at SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo hope everyone is safely enjoying the hot summer weather.

St Clair County's SKYWARN program update

7/6/2020 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo along with our corporate office closely monitors local and national storm predictions. Recently a program was added to aid in storm predicting to help local residence prepare.The Emergency Mangament Department in St Clair County MI provided an update on the progress the SKYWARN program. Below is their update: 

"The National Weather Service (NWS) utilizes trained personnel in the field to provide timely and accurate reports of storm activity from various locations that can supplement the NWS radar network.

In our SKYWARN program, there are over 50 trained weather spotters available to report weather conditions to the Emergency Operations Center. These individuals come from many walks of life, some utilizing amateur radios while other will utilize cell phones as their reporting methods. Many of the spotters are equipped with pagers to insure prompt notification of weather warnings. In addition to our SKYWARN spotter system, many of our local fire departments place apparatus in key locations to assist in providing weather information.

The NWS has provided both basic and advanced training to many members of the program. Additional internal training along with some specialized FEMA training is available to the members who meet on a monthly basis.

With the SKYWARN concept, our residents have the potential to receive earlier notification of life threatening weather situations. Obviously any delay in reporting and notification poses the threat of injury and even death. As you can see the SKYWARN program plays an important part of our notification system.

If you are interested in being a member of the St. Clair County SKYWARN team or need more information contact the Office of Emergency Management at 810-989-6965 or E-Mail Becky Mayes."

If you or someone you know has suffered any storm damage to your residential or commercial building please contact our office at (586) 336-7373. We are here to help 24 hours a day! 

Water levels are on the rise!

7/6/2020 (Permalink)

The Voice News recently reported lake and river levels are on the rise. "Expect the river to keep rising." That was the bad news from Justin Westmiller, director of St. Clair County Emergency Management. "If you live anywhere basically below East China, you will have a significant flooding issue if you're anywhere on or near the water," Westmiller said.

Since then Jeffrey Bohm, chairperson of the Board of Commissioners, declared a local state of emergency due to widespread or severe damage to property caused by flooding. Westmiller's office announced. "The potential of further severe flooding exists based on increased water."

How high is going to get?

According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Great Lakes Basin's precipitation for May was 21 percent higher than average.

"It probably won't cause significant flooding in the St. Clair area, although there may be some minor flooding," said Westmiller. "Significant or major flooding is considered 18 inches or more in your house ... anything that would get to an electrical receptacle in your home. It's also the point where most gas meters would be flooded out and they'd have to be turned off."

Every waterfront community is offering free sand bags to residents, which they must fill themselves.

If you or someone you know is affected by this flooding please call your local water restoration professionals at SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo.

We are available 24 hours a day at (586) 336-7373

Be Prepared

8/30/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo 

(586) 336 7373

https://www.SERVPROmarinecityromeo.com

We’re not capable of controlling the weather but we can be prepared. Michigan weather has caused much flooding in the St. Clair County Area. Be prepared for high winds and high water. The Lake Levels haven’t shown any signs of receding. The following are examples of how you can prepare yourself and your family for any disaster.

  1. Sand Bags
  2. Sump Pumps in working order (maybe even a back-up sump pump
  3. Generator
  4. Flash lights
  5. Batteries for flash lights, phones, etc.
  6. Can food
  7. Blocks on hand to set furniture off the floor
  8. SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo – Emergency Phone Number
  9. Have Insurance Agents phone number, policy number, on hand.
  10. Do you have flood Insurance – know what it covers and what it doesn’t

Algonac Storm Damage St. Clair County

8/27/2019 (Permalink)

Sand bags lined up on a wet dock of a St Clair County home. River level is at same height as the dock. High Water, Flooding, St. Clair County

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo  (586) 336 7373

https://www.SERVPROmarinecityromeo.com

FLOODING:  Saint Clair County and Macomb

County Storms and high Water. 

Article from:

“Michigan Fire Claim, Inc.”

http://michiganfireclaimsinc.com/water-damage-claims/

Will My Insurance Cover

Water Damage

A standard policy usually covers only water damages where the

cause was “sudden and accidental”, for example forgetting to

turn a faucet off, a burst pipe, or a blocked toilet. A standard

insurance policy will not cover damages from floods or an Act of God.

So if your flooded basement is caused storms, or overflowing rivers, that

is a flood, and not covered Certain insurance carriers have extended

coverage for water back-up. You should always check with your

agent to see if you have ample coverage in case of water damage.

Local Storms

8/23/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo vehicle parked in front of office on a stormy day. Here in the community and here to help!

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo 586) 336 7373

August of 2019 was a month of storms that left many people in the St Clair County and Macomb without electricity. These storms caused many sump pump failures causing basements and crawl spaces to fill up with large amounts of water.

For Safety Reasons shut off circuit breakers and avoid tracking contaminants thru out your home. The water should be removed as soon as possible 

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo has highly certified technicians.  Upon receiving the proper information such as location, insurance company, claim number our company will immediately begin the procedure to properly dry and clean affected areas.  We are committed to helping our community when the need arises. We here to help.

https://www.SERVPROmarinecityromeo.com

Storm Preparedness and Safety

7/11/2019 (Permalink)

8 THINGS TO KEEP IN YOUR STORM SHELTER

Severe storms can happen anytime anywhere make sure you're prepared!

1. TAKE BOTTLED WATER AND CRACKERS 

If you DO get stranded in your safe room or basement, you’ll need plenty of water to get you through. The human body can survive much longer without food, but you need to have water handy.

2. PUT A LEASH ON YOUR PET 

Take your pets WITH you to your shelter, and put them on a leash.  In the very least, take the leash (or have an extra) in your safe room.

3. HAVE A FIRST AID KIT 

Just in case, you’ll want to have a first-aid kit handy.

4. FLASHLIGHT

Take a flashlight! Your power may go out.  Have a flash light handy.

5. PHONE CHARGER

Charge your phone prior to a storm watch, you’ll know its coming. If possible, take a phone charger or charged up portable power bank with you to your safe room.  If you’ll be in the safe room for any length of time, it will come in handy.

Original Article:Heart Hook Home Apr 26

Why Choose SERVPRO for Storm Damage Remediation

7/2/2019 (Permalink)

Our Technicians have IICRC industry certifications and are trained by corporate professionals to ensure the best job is done. You can always be sure our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. 

All of our training programs include the following:

  • IICRC Training
  • Employee Certification Training
  • Initial Franchise Training
  • e-Learnings
  • Continuing Education Classes

IICRC Training and Certification

Our services are certified by The Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC). Our Technicians study IICRC standards and best practices in water restoration, fire restoration, mold remediation, carpet and upholstery cleaning, and other cleaning and restoration courses.

Employee Certification Training

The Employee Certification Training is a voluntary, self-paced program designed for SERVPRO Franchise employees. Training includes 

  • Crew Training
  • Fire Restoration
  • Water Restoration
  • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

e-Learnings

This is a voluntary program in which employees are educated online through videos and other tools to ensure they are best equipped to handle any emergency

Continuing Education Classes 

These classes are offered to ensure that those taking them are up to date on the latest and greatest methods in the remediation business 

  • Water Damage Restoration
  • Fire Damage Restoration
  • Understanding Mold in the Restoration Industry
  • Restorative Drying for Loss Control
  • Mitigation Awareness Response Seminar (non-credit course)

St Clair County State of Emergency

6/27/2019 (Permalink)

Approximately 3:00pm EST June 21st Jeff Bohm, Chair person of of the Board of Commission for St Clair County declared a state of emergency for South Eastern St. Clair County, Michigan.This is due to the continued threat of rising water levels especially in the Algonac/Clay township area. 

They are encouraging those affected by flooding to contact the Emergency operation center by phone at (810)-989-6392 or by email at damage@stclaircounty.org 

Should you find you need tips and tricks on sandbagging your home or commercial property or other flood prevention tips take a look at some of our other blog posts. And if you find yourself needing water remediation contact SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo at (586)-336-7373 for around the clock service.                 

Storm Safety

6/19/2019 (Permalink)

Storm Safety | Eversource

Summer with it's sun and warm weather can also bring along some ugly storms. It's imperative that you ensure the safety of your family. You can do so by following these tips from an Article on Storm Safety and Power Outages on Eversource

If you lose power during a storm, there are several safety hazards to keep in mind.

One preemptive step you can take is packing a storm safety kit with things like flashlights and extra batteries, a first aid kit, water and some snacks. Also, make sure you memorize or write down a set of emergency numbers, in case you are unable to charge your cell phone, and check the batteries in your smoke detectors.

If you’re using a generator to power your house, be sure to use a properly installed, code approved transfer switch when you turn it on.

You can also plug your electrical devices directly into the generator. Only use heavy-duty, outdoor power cords, and remember to check for frays.  

Always operate your generator in an open, well-ventilated area to avoid potentially fatal carbon monoxide poisoning. Remember to test your carbon monoxide detectors often.

https://youtu.be/mjNyrb6bNSc 

St. Clair County Winter Weather

1/14/2019 (Permalink)

Winter storm freeze your pipes. Contact SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo to help!

A major winter storm can happen at any time and can last for several days. These storms may bring high winds, freezing rain, heavy snowfall, and cold temperatures. Storms like these can lead to difficult travel, and power outages. It is important to prepare ahead of time so you are not left in the cold.

Below is a list of ideas for your home and car in advance for winter emergencies.

  • Be ready to shelter-in-place for three days.
  • Keep sand, rock salt, or non-clumping kitty litter available to make walkways and steps less slippery.

  • Dress in several layers of lightweight clothing, wear mittens, and a hat (preferably one that covers your ears).

  • Minimize travel. If travel is necessary, keep a full tank of gas and an emergency supply kit in your vehicle.

  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or other local news channels for critical information from the National Weather Service.

  • Insulate your home by installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic from the inside to keep cold air out.

  • Maintain heating equipment. All fuel-burning equipment should be vented to the outside and kept clear. Space heaters and fireplaces increase the risk of household fires and carbon monoxide poisoning.  

  • Running water, even at a trickle, helps prevent pipes from freezing. 

Be prepared, stay safe and remember SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is always here to help!

Storm Damage And Your Home

8/20/2018 (Permalink)

Storms can happen at any time. Taking some precautions ahead of time can keep you safe and save you time and money. 

Thunderstorms, tornadoes, hailstorms and hurricanes can cause property damage. You should always check for storm damage to your property especially areas that are the most susceptible like your roof.

TIPS AFTER A STORM

  1. Inspect your attic for leaks or water damage. Also, if any water stains appear on your ceiling or walls, this is a sign that you may have a leak and need repairs.
  2. Look for other signs of storm damage from the ground. Check for missing shingles, missing fascia, or damaged gutters. Also, assess the condition of your exhaust pipes, valleys, outer edges or angles of the roof.
  3.  Some damage may be obvious, such as a tree falling on your roof. In this case, stay out of your home until a professional can determine whether any structural damage occurred. 
  4. If the storm produced hail, check for damage to your siding as well. Hail damage commonly comes in the forms of dimples, made by smaller chunks of hail that pound the outer layer of shingles.

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is Here to Help 24/7. Call us at (586) 336-7373

Staying Safe At The Beach

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

Lake Michigan 2018 Beach Services Provided by the National Weather Service Will you be safe from dangerous swimming conditions on Lake Michigan this year? The beach should be fun. Unfortunately, far too many people are injured or killed along our nation's beaches by hazards such as dangerous storms, currents, heat and lightning. The National Weather Service can help ensure you leave the beach with good memories. NWS and our sister agency, the National Ocean Service, provide you the information you need to stay safe on beaches and in coastal areas and surf zones. If you live on the Great Lakes you face a unique set of Beach challenges.

Each year there are an average 12 drowning fatalities and 23 rescues on Lake Michigan's eastern shore due to the prevailing wind direction resulting in favorable current development. This is also a popular tourist destination so precautions should be taken to stay safe and enjoy your time at the Lake.

To help beach goers remain safe at Lake Michigan beaches, the National Weather Service (NWS) in Milwaukee/Sullivan provides a daily beach forecast for beaches along Lake Michigan.  This daily beach forecast includes a "swim risk" for the coming day.  The "swim risk" will help you assess the risk of swimming in Lake Michigan, and can help you avoid an unnecessary trip to the beach due to expected weather or dangerous swim conditions. 

If your planning a trip to the beach make sure and check out the National Weather Service Milwaukee/Sullivan webpage.

What to do Incase of a Storm

8/3/2018 (Permalink)

Introduction

Thunderstorms, hail, blizzards, ice storms, hurricanes, storm surges, tornadoes and heavy rain can develop quickly and threaten life and property. These severe storms occur in all regions of Canada and in all seasons.

When one strikes, visit Environment Canada's Weather office website and listen to the local media for severe weather warnings and advice. Keep a battery-powered or crank radio on hand as power outages can be frequent during severe storms. Everyone has a responsibility to protect their homes and their families.

You can greatly lessen the impact of a severe storm by taking the time to prepare in advance. This involves three basic steps:

  1. Find out about the risks and the type of storms in your region.
  2. Make a family emergency plan, so that everyone knows what to do, and where to go in case of an emergency.
  3. Get an emergency kit, so that you and your family can be self-sufficient for at least 72 hours during a severe storm.

Planning for a storm will also help prepare you for many other types of emergencies. After reading this guide, keep it in a handy spot, such as in your emergency kit.

Step 1: Know the risks and get prepared

To get prepared for a storm, you should know the risks specific to your community and your region to help you better prepare. To find out what the hazards are in your region, visit the ‘Know the risks' section of the GetPrepared.ca website.

PREPARING for severe storms

Before

  • Trim dead branches and cut down dead trees to reduce the danger of these falling onto your house during a storm.
  • Clean gutters, drains and downpipes.
  • Make sure your roof is in good repair.
  • Prepare an emergency kit.

When a storm is imminent

  • When a severe storm is on the horizon, Environment Canada will issue weather warnings through the Weatheroffice website, automated telephone information lines and its “Weatheradio” service. Radio and television stations will also broadcast Environment Canada weather statements. Pay attention to that information.
  • Always check the weather forecast before heading out on the water. Do not go boating in a storm. If you are on the water and see bad weather approaching, head for shore immediately. Remember to file a sail plan with a responsible person, and frequently monitor the VHF marine or Weatheradio broadcast throughout your trip.
  • Secure everything that might be blown around or torn loose – indoors and outdoors. Flying objects such as garbage cans and lawn furniture can injure people and damage property.
  • Consider going to the sheltered area that you and your family identified in your emergency plan.

During a storm

  • If you are indoors during a storm, stay away from windows, doors and fireplaces.
  • If you are advised by officials to evacuate, do so. Delay may make later evacuation difficult or impossible. Take your emergency kit with you.
  • If indoors, you can use a cellular or cordless telephone during a severe storm, but it is not safe to use a corded telephone.
  • If you are in a car, stop the car away from trees or power lines that might fall on you. Avoid the base of steep or unstable slopes and low areas prone to flooding. Stay inside the car.

Blizzards and winter storms

Blizzards come in on a wave of cold arctic air, bringing snow, bitter cold, high winds and poor visibility due to blowing snow.

Blizzards:

  • May last anywhere from a few hours to several days.
  • Are often accompanied by high winds in the Prairies, Arctic, northern Ontario and northern Quebec.
  • Typically bring heavy snowfalls in British Columbia, the Atlantic Provinces, southern and eastern Quebec and areas near the Great Lakes.
  • May include a wind chill “warning”, issued when very cold temperatures (-35°C or colder) combined with wind could create outdoor conditions hazardous to human activity.
  • Can give rise to a wind storm warning when winds are expected to reach a steady speed of between 65-75 km/h, or 90-100 km/h in gusts.
  • Can leave heavy snowfall that can cause roof failures or collapses.

What to do

  • If a blizzard or heavy blowing snow is forecast, you may want to string a safety line between your house and any other structures or buildings in case you have to go to them during the storm.
  • When a winter storm hits, stay indoors. If you must go outside, dress for the weather. Outer clothing should be tightly woven and water-repellent. The jacket should have a hood. Wear mittens – they are warmer than gloves – and a hat, as significant body heat is lost through the head.
  • In wide-open areas, visibility is limited during heavy blowing snow or a blizzard. You can easily lose your way. If a blizzard strikes, do not try to walk to another building unless there is a rope to guide you or something you can follow.
  • If you must travel during a winter storm, do so during the day and let someone know your route and arrival time.
  • If your car gets stuck in a blizzard or snowstorm, stay in your car. Allow fresh air in your car by opening the window slightly on the sheltered side – away from the wind. You can run the car engine about 10 minutes every half-hour if the exhaust system is not blocked with snow. Check the exhaust pipe periodically to make sure it is not blocked. Remember: you can't smell potentially fatal carbon monoxide fumes.
  • To keep your hands and feet warm, exercise them periodically. In general, it is a good idea to keep moving to avoid falling asleep. If you do try to shovel the snow from around your car, avoid overexerting yourself. Overexertion in the bitter cold can cause death as a result of hypothermia from sweating or a heart attack.
  • If snow is excessive or a roof shows signs of distress, contact a professional who is experienced in safe snow removal procedures. Unsafe procedures may cause personal injury and structural damage. Prevent access to areas under roofs where snow could fall.
  • If you live on a farm, shelter animals. Generally, if the structure is sound, animals should be placed indoors. Once they are inside, secure all openings to the outside. Water supplies should be checked to ensure they have not frozen.

Hurricanes

Hurricanes are violent tropical storms. These extreme storms occur when winds revolve around a centre of low pressure. In the centre, called the eye, there is often a calm area of blue sky.

Hurricanes:

  • Occasionally hit eastern Canada, usually between June and November (September is the peak month).
  • Are bigger and cause more widespread damage than tornadoes (a very large system can be up to 1,000 kilometers wide).
  • Wield very strong winds – of at least 120 kilometers per hour – around the “eye” accompanied by torrential rains.
  • Can bring heavy rain and cause significant flooding.
  • Can often be tracked several days in advance of landfall.
  • Usually move slowly and can batter communities for several hours.

What to do

  • During hurricane season, pay attention to weather forecasts and warnings.
  • If you live on the coast or in a low-lying area near the coast, move inland and to higher ground. The high winds create huge waves at sea which can be very damaging when combined with a storm surge (see Storm Surges section).
  • Do not go down to the water to watch the storm. Most fatalities during hurricanes occur as a result of being caught in large waves, storm surges or flood waters.
  • If the eye of the hurricane passes over, there will be a lull in the wind lasting from several minutes to half an hour. Stay in a safe place. Make emergency repairs only and remember that once the eye has passed, the winds will return from the opposite direction with possibly even greater force.
  • Listen for reports from authorities on your crank or battery powered radio.
  • On a farm, it may be better to leave livestock unsheltered. During past hurricanes some animals left outside suffered less injury than those in shelters, which were injured by collapsing structures and flying objects that may have been avoided outside.

Ice storms

Freezing rain occurs when raindrops fall from a warm layer of air into air that is below freezing and become supercooled. When the supercooled droplets strike a surface below 0°C they instantly freeze, forming a layer of ice.

Ice storms:

  • Freezing rain can occur anywhere in the country, but is particularly common in Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic provinces.
  • Remember that ice, branches or power lines can continue to break and fall for several hours after the end of the precipitation.

What to do

  • Ice from freezing rain accumulates on branches, power lines and buildings. If you must go outside when a significant amount of ice has accumulated, pay attention to branches or wires that could break due to the weight of the ice and fall on you.
  • Never approach power lines. A hanging power line could be charged (live) and you could be electrocuted. Stay back at least 10 meters (33 feet) from wires or anything in contact with them.
  • When freezing rain is forecast, avoid driving if possible. Even a small amount of freezing rain can make roads extremely slippery. Wait several hours after freezing rain ends so that road maintenance crews have enough time to spread sand or salt on icy roads.
  • Rapid onsets of freezing rain combined with strong winds increase the chances for hypothermia. If you live on a farm, move livestock promptly to shelter where feed is available. Forage is often temporarily inaccessible during and immediately after ice storms.

Storm surges

A storm surge is an abnormally high coastal water level caused by strong winds and low air pressure during storms.

Storm surges:

  • Occur on all of Canada's coasts, including those of the Great Lakes.
  • Occur with severe storms such as hurricanes, blizzards, and ice storms.
  • Can damage buildings, docks, boats and other structures near the shoreline.

What to do

  • Your property may be prone to flooding from storm surges. If so, do not store valuables and emergency equipment in your basement or lower floor. Consider removing exterior doors and windows to your basement and sealing holes and cracks.
  • Consider securing small structures such as cottages and mobile homes to a foundation to prevent them from being floated off their footings. If possible, seek shelter in a more secure building.
  • Storm surges are predictable and are typically forecast as part of coastal storm warnings. Monitor weather forecasts.
  • If flooding is predicted, be prepared to turn off household power and gas. Evacuate when instructed to do so by local authorities.

Thunderstorms, lightning and hail

Thunderstorms are often accompanied by high winds, hail, lightning, heavy rain and in rare cases can produce tornadoes. Hail is formed when updrafts in thunderclouds carry raindrops upward into extremely cold areas of the atmosphere, where they freeze and merge into lumps of ice.

Thunderstorms, lightning and hail:

  • Thunderstorms and lightning occur throughout Canada but less frequently in the North. On average, 10 people die each year in Canada and up to 160 are injured during such storms.
  • Thunderstorms are usually over within an hour, although a series of thunderstorms can last several hours.
  • Hailstorms occur across Canada, mostly from May to October. They are most frequent in Alberta, the southern Prairies and in southern Ontario.
  • Some hailstones are the size of peas while others can be as big as grapefruits.
  • Hail comes down at great speed, especially when accompanied by high winds and can cause serious injuries and damages.

What to do if outside

  • If you are caught outside and you can see lightning or hear thunder, you are in danger of being hit. Seek shelter immediately either in an enclosed building or a hard-topped vehicle. There is no safe place outside in a thunderstorm.
  • If caught outside far from a safe location, stay away from tall objects, such as trees, poles, wires and fences. Take shelter in a low lying area.
  • Wait 30 minutes after the last rumble of thunder before going outside again.

What to do if inside

  • Before a severe thunderstorm, unplug radios, televisions and appliances (especially those that may start up automatically when the power is restored). Listen for weather updates on your wind-up or battery-powered radio.
  • If you need to use the phone during a thunderstorm use a cordless phone.
  • Stay away from items that may conduct electricity, such as corded telephones, appliances, sinks, bathtubs, radiators and metal pipes.
  • Consult our “Power Outages – What to do?” publication for more information.
  • If hail is forecast, protect your vehicle by putting it in the garage or other enclosed space.
  • Take cover when hail begins to fall. Do not go out to cover plants, cars or garden furniture.
  • When a hailstorm hits, stay indoors, and keep yourself and your pets away from windows, glass doors and skylights which can shatter if hit by hailstones.

Warning signs of a potential tornado

  • Severe thunderstorms.
  • An extremely dark sky, sometimes highlighted by green or yellow clouds.
  • A rumbling or a whistling sound caused by flying debris.
  • A funnel cloud at the rear base of a thundercloud, often behind a curtain of heavy rain or hail.

What to do

In all cases

  • Get as close to the ground as possible, protect your head and watch for flying debris.
  • Do not chase tornadoes – they are unpredictable and can change course abruptly.
  • A tornado is deceptive. It may appear to be standing still but may in fact be moving toward you.

In a house

  • Go to the basement or take shelter in a small interior ground floor room such as a bathroom, closet or hallway.
  • If you have no basement, protect yourself by taking shelter under a heavy table or desk.
  • In all cases, stay away from windows, outside walls and doors.

On a farm

  • If your personal safety is not at risk, you may have time to open routes of escape for your livestock. Open the gate, if necessary, and then exit the area in a direction perpendicular to the expected path of the tornado.

In a recreational vehicle or mobile home

  • Find shelter elsewhere, preferably in a building with a strong foundation.
  • If no shelter is available, crouch down in a ditch away from the mobile home or recreational vehicle. Beware of flooding from downpours and be prepared to move.

In a high rise building

  • Take shelter in an inner hallway or room, ideally in the basement or on the ground floor.
  • Do not use the elevator.
  • Stay away from windows.

In a gymnasium, church or auditorium

  • Large buildings with wide-span roofs may collapse if a tornado hits.
  • If you are in one of these buildings and cannot leave, take cover under a sturdy structure such as a table or desk.

In a vehicle

  • If you spot a tornado in the distance go to the nearest solid shelter.
  • If the tornado is close, get out of your car and take cover in a low-lying area, such as a ditch.
  • Do not take shelter under an overpass or a bridge. Winds can accelerate under an overpass or a bridge and cause injury or death from flying debris.

Step 2: Make an emergency plan

Every Canadian household needs an emergency plan. It will help you and your family to know what to do in case of an emergency. Remember, your family may not be together when a storm or other emergency occurs. Identify safe places where everyone should meet if they have to leave home during an emergency.

Start by discussing what could happen and what you should do at home, at school or at work if a severe storm strikes. To be prepared, make a list of what needs to be done ahead of time. Store important family documents, such as birth certificates, passports, wills, financial documents, insurance policies, etc. in waterproof container(s). Identify an appropriate out-of-town contact that can act as a central point of contact in an emergency.

Write down and exercise your plan with the entire family at least once a year. Make sure everybody has a copy and keeps it close at hand.

For more information on making an emergency plan, call 1-800-O-Canada or visit GetPrepared.ca to download or complete an emergency plan online.

Step 3: Get an emergency kit

In an emergency you will need some basic supplies. You may need to get by without power or tap water. Be prepared to be self-sufficient for at least 72 hours.

You may have some of the items already, such as a flashlight, battery-operated radio, food and water. The key is to make sure they are organized and easy to find. Would you be able to find your flashlight in the dark?

Make sure your kit is easy to carry. Keep it in a backpack, duffel bag or suitcase with wheels, in an easy-to-reach, accessible place, such as your front hall closet. Make sure everyone in the household knows where the emergency kit is.

Basic emergency kit

  • Water – at least two litres of water per person per day. Include small bottles that can be carried easily in case of an evacuation order.
  • Food that won't spoil, such as canned food, energy bars and dried foods (remember to replace food and water once a year).
  • Manual can opener.
  • Crank or battery-powered flashlight (and extra batteries).
  • Crank or battery-powered radio (and extra batteries).
  • First aid kit.
  • Special items such as prescription medications, infant formula, equipment for people with disabilities.
  • Extra keys to your car and house
  • Some cash in smaller bills, such as $10 bills and change for payphones
  • A copy of your emergency plan and contact information

Floods/Storms

7/2/2018 (Permalink)

Floods

Failing to evacuate flooded areas, entering flood waters, or remaining after a flood has passed can result in injury or death. Flooding is a temporary overflow of water onto land that is normally dry. Floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States. Floods may:

  • Result from rain, snow, coastal storms, storm surges, and overflows of dams and other water systems.

  • Develop slowly or quickly – Flash floods can come with no warning.

  • Cause outages, disrupt transportation, damage buildings, and create landslides.

 IF YOU ARE UNDER A FLOOD WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

    • Just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.

  • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

  • Determine how best to protect yourself based on the type of flooding.

    • Evacuate if told to do so.

    • Move to higher ground or a higher floor.

    • Stay where you are.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A FLOOD THREATENS

WHAT TO DO NOW: Prepare

  • Know types of flood risk in your area. Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center for information.

  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.

  • If flash flooding is a risk in your location, then monitor potential signs, such as heavy rain.

  • Learn and practice evacuation routes, shelter plans, and flash flood response.

  • Gather supplies in case you have to leave immediately, or if services are cut off. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets. Obtain extra batteries and charging devices for phones and other critical equipment.

  • Purchase or renew a flood insurance policy. It typically takes up to 30 days for a policy to go into effect and can protect the life you've built. Homeowner’s policies do not cover flooding. Get flood coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)

  • Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies.

  • Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.

WHAT TO DO DURING: Survive

  • Depending on where you are, and the impact and the warning time of flooding, go to the safe location that you previously identified.
  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown!
  • Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.
  • If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, then stay inside. If water is rising inside the vehicle, then seek refuge on the roof.
  • If trapped in a building, then go to its highest level. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising floodwater. Go on the roof only if necessary. Once there, signal for help.

WHAT TO DO AFTER: Be Safe

  • Listen to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
  • Avoid driving, except in emergencies.
  • Snakes and other animals may be in your house. Wear heavy gloves and boots during clean up.
  • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows.


    Ref. sec. Ready.gov

Emergency Managagment

7/2/2018 (Permalink)

Emergency Management

WINS (Warning Information Notification System)

WINS (Warning Information Notification System) is a public service alert system that includes over 150 categories of weather, emergency and non-emergency alerts. WINS notifications are sent to your home phone, smartphone, TTY, email or text messages by county departments, townships, villages and cities within St. Clair County. YOU choose the alert types and delivery methods that are important to you and your family. A couple of helpful tips when signing up:

  1. Please ensure that you open each category using the “+” symbol to see each alert type within the category. The weather category alone includes 32 types of alerts and you can select which are important to you.
  2. When in the weather category, please ensure that you set your “do not disturb between” hours for non-emergency weather alerts. You will receive emergency weather alerts such as Tornado warnings regardless of your “do not disturb between” hours.
  3. Put in the addresses that are important to you. Because this system allows agencies to target their information in emergency situations, only people who have an address listed in the immediate area will receive emergency alerts. Please ensure you input the addresses that are important to you. You can have up to five addresses including home, work, school or other.

If you have any questions about the Warning Information Notification System, please contact the Office of St. Clair County Homeland Security and Emergency Management at (810) 989-6965.


Contact InformationOffice of Homeland Security / Emergency Management
295 Airport Drive
Kimball, MI 48074

Phone:(810) 989-6965Fax:(810) 364-4603Email:Emergency Management

Why choose SERVPRO for your Storm damage needs

11/24/2017 (Permalink)

Call (586)336-7373 SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo when the storm subsides. Our Highly Trained Cleaning and Restoration Specialists are available 24/7.

Our Technicians are trained in property damage restoration at SERVPRO’s Corporate Training Facility and have IICRC industry certifications.  You can be certain our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. 

All of our training programs include the following:

  • IICRC Training
  • Employee Certification Training
  • Initial Franchise Training
  • e-Learnings
  • Continuing Education Classes

IICRC Training and Certification

The Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) certifies and sets the standards for the cleaning and restoration industries. Our Professionals study IICRC standards and best practices in water restoration, fire restoration, mold remediation, carpet and upholstery cleaning, and other cleaning and restoration courses.

Employee Certification Training

The Employee Certification Training is a voluntary, self-paced program designed for SERVPRO Franchise employees. Certification is awarded after successful completion of course materials and an examination. Modules include:

  • Crew Training
  • Fire Restoration
  • Water Restoration
  • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

Initial Franchise Training

A 15-day hands-on course at the SERVPRO Corporate Training Facility is the foundation of the SERVPRO training program. This course is primarily for new Franchise owners and covers many restoration topics:

  • Fire Restoration
  • Water Restoration
  • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
  • Mold Mitigation

e-Learnings

All of our staff have access to web-based training. This voluntary program is designed to be an ongoing, self-paced coaching series for a Franchise's employees. Video presentations and support materials are followed by a knowledge test at the end of each module. This keeps our technicians and office staff up to speed on industry standards and the professional quality you expect.

Continuing Education Classes

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo offers both credit and noncredit courses for insurance agents, insurance adjusters, real estate professionals, and Franchise staff. These programs are designed to improve knowledge of emergency mitigation. Courses include:

  • Water Damage Restoration
  • Fire Damage Restoration
  • Understanding Mold in the Restoration Industry
  • Restorative Drying for Loss Control
  • Mitigation Awareness Response Seminar (non-credit course)

About Our Storm Restoration Services

8/16/2017 (Permalink)

No Job Is Too Large

The SERVPRO Commercial Large Loss Division is composed of our best of the best in restoration. Our elite large-loss specialists are prequalified and strategically positioned throughout the United States to handle any size disaster.

Every large loss is supervised by a commercial operations manager to help ensure seamless communication and timely mitigation.

At SERVPRO, the difference is our ability to dispatch trained production professionals and cut costs through the strategic placement and oversight of temporary labor. Get the professionals, call SERVPRO.

Clients for the Commercial Large Loss program include the following:

  • The Hospitality Industry
  • Property Managers
  • Universities
  • Municipalities
  • The Pentagon

Should a storm or major event strike, call SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo at (586)-336-7373

Catastrophic Storm and Major Event Response

The SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team can provide help whether you're dealing with a tornado, hurricane, blizzard or flood. The SERVPRO System has a network of strategically positioned storm teams on standby should a disaster strike near you. Available 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are prepared for the unpredictable.

With the ability to mobilize local command centers, along with the resources of more than 1,700 Franchises nationwide, no disaster is too big. Recent mobilizations of the Catastrophic Storm Response Teams include:

  • 2014 Polar Vortex
  • 2012 Sandy
  • 2010 Nashville floods
  • 2008 Ike
  • 2007 Chicago floods
  • 2007 Ohio floods
  • 2007 California wildfires
  • 2005 Katrina/Wilma/Rit

How To Prepare for a Storm

8/10/2017 (Permalink)

Pick up basic survival items. You should have enough supplies to survive without leaving your house for a few days, as well as tools to help you leave if necessary. Stock up on these necessities: A shovel, flashlight, candles, non-perishable food, bottled water, etc 

Keep yourself warm. Losing heat is definitely uncomfortable, but you can survive it. Here's what to do:
  • Stop your pipes from freezing. Before you settle into a nest of blankets, go around your house and turn on every faucet so that it's dripping just slightly. Keeping the water moving through the pipes should help prevent them from freezing.
  • Seal up any drafts. Put towels at the bottom of any doors that have a gap, or around loose windows. If your windows are single-paned, close the curtains or pin a blanket up over them to keep the heat in.
  • Dress in layers. Put on a thin layer of cotton clothing close to your skin, and cover as much as your body as you can. For ladies, consider putting on a pair of tights. On top of that, wear as many layers as you need to keep warm, finishing with warm woolen socks and a sweatshirt or coat with a hood.
  • Wear a hood. You lose a lot of heat from the top of your head, so keep it covered. If you don't have hooded clothing, wrap a scarf or towel around your head.
  • Stay in bed. Put as many covers as you have left over onto your bed, and hop in. Keeping your body heat in an enclosed space like the sheets will help you stay as warm as possible.

Stay updated. Having current information is vital in an emergency, so make arrangements to stay informed.

  • Watch updates on the news or listen to the radio for as long as you can before power goes out.
  • Use social media for updates. If you don't have access to a battery-operated radio, follow national and local disaster agencies (such as FEMA) on Facebook and Twitter. Check periodically for updates.
  • Use SMS messaging if land-line service is down. You can send an SMS via basic text messaging, or through Twitter updates. Get the phone numbers or Twitter handles of all your family members, and make sure they know how to reach you.

Wikihow 

Emergency Notification System

7/24/2017 (Permalink)

St Clair County Emergency Management Update

St Clair Co Emergency Management Department is now offering a notification system for all residents.

WINS (Warning Information Notification System) is a public service alert system that includes over 150 categories of weather, emergency and non-emergency alerts. WINS notifications are sent to your home phone, smartphone, TTY, email or text messages by county departments, townships, villages and cities within St. Clair County. YOU choose the alert types and delivery methods that are important to you and your family. A couple of helpful tips when signing up:

  1. Please ensure that you open each category using the “+” symbol to see each alert type within the category. The weather category alone includes 32 types of alerts and you can select which are important to you.
  2. When in the weather category, please ensure that you set your “do not disturb between” hours for non-emergency weather alerts. You will receive emergency weather alerts such as Tornado warnings regardless of your “do not disturb between” hours.
  3. Put in the addresses that are important to you. Because this system allows agencies to target their information in emergency situations, only people who have an address listed in the immediate area will receive emergency alerts. Please ensure you input the addresses that are important to you. You can have up to five addresses including home, work, school or other.

If you have any questions about the Warning Information Notification System, please contact the Office of St. Clair County Homeland Security and Emergency Management at (810) 989-6965.

BE READY, STAY INFORMED

St Clair County Introduces New Storm Program

7/10/2017 (Permalink)

St Clair County's Emergency Management Department announced a new storm warning program. The SKYWARN program is a part of the St. Clair County ARES/RACES organization.

The National Weather Service (NWS) utilizes trained personnel in the field to provide timely and accurate reports of storm activity from various locations that can supplement the NWS radar network.

In the SKYWARN program, there are over 50 trained weather spotters available to report weather conditions to the Emergency Operations Center. These individuals come from many walks of life, some utilizing amateur radios while other will utilize cell phones as their reporting methods. Many of the spotters are equipped with pagers to insure prompt notification of weather warnings. In addition to the SKYWARN spotter system, many of our local fire departments place apparatus in key locations to assist in providing weather information. Local residents  now will have the potential to receive earlier notification of life threatening weather situations.

Storm Damage

6/9/2017 (Permalink)

A winter storm caused damaged to a customers roof and water leaked into the home affecting several rooms.

Thunderstorms, tornadoes, hailstorms and hurricanes can tear shingles from your roof or cause more severe damage. After a storm you should always check for storm damage to your roof

• Inspect your attic for leaks or water damage. Also, if any water stains appear on your ceiling or walls, this is a sign that you have a leak and need repairs.

• Look for other signs of storm damage from the ground. Check for missing shingles, missing fascia, or damaged gutters. Also, assess the condition of your exhaust pipes, valleys, outer edges or angles of the roof.

• Some damage may be obvious, such as a tree falling on your roof. In this case, stay out of your home until a professional can determine whether any structural damage occurred. Call SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo at (586) 336-7373 to assess any structural damage or repair work.

• If the storm produced hail, check for damage to your siding as well. Hail damage commonly comes in the forms of dimples, made by smaller chunks of hail that pound the outer layer of shingles.

• Stay safe!

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is Here to Help 24/7. Call us at (586) 336-7373

When Storms or Floods hit St. Clair County, SERVPRO is ready!

10/4/2016 (Permalink)

Do You Have Storm or Flood Damage? Please Call Us Today 586-336-7373

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit St. Clair County, we can scale our resources to handle any size storm or flooding disaster. If necessary, we can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and the elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is here to help 24 hours a day.

Call us today at 586-336-7373