Recent Storm Damage Posts

Storm Preparedness and Safety

7/11/2019 (Permalink)

8 THINGS TO KEEP IN YOUR STORM SHELTER

Severe storms can happen anytime anywhere make sure you're prepared!

1. TAKE BOTTLED WATER AND CRACKERS 

If you DO get stranded in your safe room or basement, you’ll need plenty of water to get you through. The human body can survive much longer without food, but you need to have water handy.

2. PUT A LEASH ON YOUR PET 

Take your pets WITH you to your shelter, and put them on a leash.  In the very least, take the leash (or have an extra) in your safe room.

3. HAVE A FIRST AID KIT 

Just in case, you’ll want to have a first-aid kit handy.

4. FLASHLIGHT

Take a flashlight! Your power may go out.  Have a flash light handy.

5. PHONE CHARGER

Charge your phone prior to a storm watch, you’ll know its coming. If possible, take a phone charger or charged up portable power bank with you to your safe room.  If you’ll be in the safe room for any length of time, it will come in handy.

Original Article:Heart Hook Home Apr 26

Why Choose SERVPRO for Storm Damage Remediation

7/2/2019 (Permalink)

Our Technicians have IICRC industry certifications and are trained by corporate professionals to ensure the best job is done. You can always be sure our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. 

All of our training programs include the following:

  • IICRC Training
  • Employee Certification Training
  • Initial Franchise Training
  • e-Learnings
  • Continuing Education Classes

IICRC Training and Certification

Our services are certified by The Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC). Our Technicians study IICRC standards and best practices in water restoration, fire restoration, mold remediation, carpet and upholstery cleaning, and other cleaning and restoration courses.

Employee Certification Training

The Employee Certification Training is a voluntary, self-paced program designed for SERVPRO Franchise employees. Training includes 

  • Crew Training
  • Fire Restoration
  • Water Restoration
  • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

e-Learnings

This is a voluntary program in which employees are educated online through videos and other tools to ensure they are best equipped to handle any emergency

Continuing Education Classes 

These classes are offered to ensure that those taking them are up to date on the latest and greatest methods in the remediation business 

  • Water Damage Restoration
  • Fire Damage Restoration
  • Understanding Mold in the Restoration Industry
  • Restorative Drying for Loss Control
  • Mitigation Awareness Response Seminar (non-credit course)

St Clair County State of Emergency

6/27/2019 (Permalink)

Approximately 3:00pm EST June 21st Jeff Bohm, Chair person of of the Board of Commission for St Clair County declared a state of emergency for South Eastern St. Clair County, Michigan.This is due to the continued threat of rising water levels especially in the Algonac/Clay township area. 

They are encouraging those affected by flooding to contact the Emergency operation center by phone at (810)-989-6392 or by email at damage@stclaircounty.org 

Should you find you need tips and tricks on sandbagging your home or commercial property or other flood prevention tips take a look at some of our other blog posts. And if you find yourself needing water remediation contact SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo at (586)-336-7373 for around the clock service.                 

Storm Safety

6/19/2019 (Permalink)

Storm Safety | Eversource

Summer with it's sun and warm weather can also bring along some ugly storms. It's imperative that you ensure the safety of your family. You can do so by following these tips from an Article on Storm Safety and Power Outages on Eversource

If you lose power during a storm, there are several safety hazards to keep in mind.

One preemptive step you can take is packing a storm safety kit with things like flashlights and extra batteries, a first aid kit, water and some snacks. Also, make sure you memorize or write down a set of emergency numbers, in case you are unable to charge your cell phone, and check the batteries in your smoke detectors.

If you’re using a generator to power your house, be sure to use a properly installed, code approved transfer switch when you turn it on.

You can also plug your electrical devices directly into the generator. Only use heavy-duty, outdoor power cords, and remember to check for frays.  

Always operate your generator in an open, well-ventilated area to avoid potentially fatal carbon monoxide poisoning. Remember to test your carbon monoxide detectors often.

https://youtu.be/mjNyrb6bNSc 

St. Clair County Winter Weather

1/14/2019 (Permalink)

Storm Damage St. Clair County Winter Weather Winter storm freeze your pipes. Contact SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo to help!

A major winter storm can happen at any time and can last for several days. These storms may bring high winds, freezing rain, heavy snowfall, and cold temperatures. Storms like these can lead to difficult travel, and power outages. It is important to prepare ahead of time so you are not left in the cold.

Below is a list of ideas for your home and car in advance for winter emergencies.

  • Be ready to shelter-in-place for three days.
  • Keep sand, rock salt, or non-clumping kitty litter available to make walkways and steps less slippery.

  • Dress in several layers of lightweight clothing, wear mittens, and a hat (preferably one that covers your ears).

  • Minimize travel. If travel is necessary, keep a full tank of gas and an emergency supply kit in your vehicle.

  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or other local news channels for critical information from the National Weather Service.

  • Insulate your home by installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic from the inside to keep cold air out.

  • Maintain heating equipment. All fuel-burning equipment should be vented to the outside and kept clear. Space heaters and fireplaces increase the risk of household fires and carbon monoxide poisoning.  

  • Running water, even at a trickle, helps prevent pipes from freezing. 

Be prepared, stay safe and remember SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is always here to help!

Storm Damage And Your Home

8/20/2018 (Permalink)

Storms can happen at any time. Taking some precautions ahead of time can keep you safe and save you time and money. 

Thunderstorms, tornadoes, hailstorms and hurricanes can cause property damage. You should always check for storm damage to your property especially areas that are the most susceptible like your roof.

TIPS AFTER A STORM

  1. Inspect your attic for leaks or water damage. Also, if any water stains appear on your ceiling or walls, this is a sign that you may have a leak and need repairs.
  2. Look for other signs of storm damage from the ground. Check for missing shingles, missing fascia, or damaged gutters. Also, assess the condition of your exhaust pipes, valleys, outer edges or angles of the roof.
  3.  Some damage may be obvious, such as a tree falling on your roof. In this case, stay out of your home until a professional can determine whether any structural damage occurred. 
  4. If the storm produced hail, check for damage to your siding as well. Hail damage commonly comes in the forms of dimples, made by smaller chunks of hail that pound the outer layer of shingles.

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is Here to Help 24/7. Call us at (586) 336-7373

Staying Safe At The Beach

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

Lake Michigan 2018 Beach Services Provided by the National Weather Service Will you be safe from dangerous swimming conditions on Lake Michigan this year? The beach should be fun. Unfortunately, far too many people are injured or killed along our nation's beaches by hazards such as dangerous storms, currents, heat and lightning. The National Weather Service can help ensure you leave the beach with good memories. NWS and our sister agency, the National Ocean Service, provide you the information you need to stay safe on beaches and in coastal areas and surf zones. If you live on the Great Lakes you face a unique set of Beach challenges.

Each year there are an average 12 drowning fatalities and 23 rescues on Lake Michigan's eastern shore due to the prevailing wind direction resulting in favorable current development. This is also a popular tourist destination so precautions should be taken to stay safe and enjoy your time at the Lake.

To help beach goers remain safe at Lake Michigan beaches, the National Weather Service (NWS) in Milwaukee/Sullivan provides a daily beach forecast for beaches along Lake Michigan.  This daily beach forecast includes a "swim risk" for the coming day.  The "swim risk" will help you assess the risk of swimming in Lake Michigan, and can help you avoid an unnecessary trip to the beach due to expected weather or dangerous swim conditions. 

If your planning a trip to the beach make sure and check out the National Weather Service Milwaukee/Sullivan webpage.

What to do Incase of a Storm

8/3/2018 (Permalink)

Introduction

Thunderstorms, hail, blizzards, ice storms, hurricanes, storm surges, tornadoes and heavy rain can develop quickly and threaten life and property. These severe storms occur in all regions of Canada and in all seasons.

When one strikes, visit Environment Canada's Weather office website and listen to the local media for severe weather warnings and advice. Keep a battery-powered or crank radio on hand as power outages can be frequent during severe storms. Everyone has a responsibility to protect their homes and their families.

You can greatly lessen the impact of a severe storm by taking the time to prepare in advance. This involves three basic steps:

  1. Find out about the risks and the type of storms in your region.
  2. Make a family emergency plan, so that everyone knows what to do, and where to go in case of an emergency.
  3. Get an emergency kit, so that you and your family can be self-sufficient for at least 72 hours during a severe storm.

Planning for a storm will also help prepare you for many other types of emergencies. After reading this guide, keep it in a handy spot, such as in your emergency kit.

Step 1: Know the risks and get prepared

To get prepared for a storm, you should know the risks specific to your community and your region to help you better prepare. To find out what the hazards are in your region, visit the ‘Know the risks' section of the GetPrepared.ca website.

PREPARING for severe storms

Before

  • Trim dead branches and cut down dead trees to reduce the danger of these falling onto your house during a storm.
  • Clean gutters, drains and downpipes.
  • Make sure your roof is in good repair.
  • Prepare an emergency kit.

When a storm is imminent

  • When a severe storm is on the horizon, Environment Canada will issue weather warnings through the Weatheroffice website, automated telephone information lines and its “Weatheradio” service. Radio and television stations will also broadcast Environment Canada weather statements. Pay attention to that information.
  • Always check the weather forecast before heading out on the water. Do not go boating in a storm. If you are on the water and see bad weather approaching, head for shore immediately. Remember to file a sail plan with a responsible person, and frequently monitor the VHF marine or Weatheradio broadcast throughout your trip.
  • Secure everything that might be blown around or torn loose – indoors and outdoors. Flying objects such as garbage cans and lawn furniture can injure people and damage property.
  • Consider going to the sheltered area that you and your family identified in your emergency plan.

During a storm

  • If you are indoors during a storm, stay away from windows, doors and fireplaces.
  • If you are advised by officials to evacuate, do so. Delay may make later evacuation difficult or impossible. Take your emergency kit with you.
  • If indoors, you can use a cellular or cordless telephone during a severe storm, but it is not safe to use a corded telephone.
  • If you are in a car, stop the car away from trees or power lines that might fall on you. Avoid the base of steep or unstable slopes and low areas prone to flooding. Stay inside the car.

Blizzards and winter storms

Blizzards come in on a wave of cold arctic air, bringing snow, bitter cold, high winds and poor visibility due to blowing snow.

Blizzards:

  • May last anywhere from a few hours to several days.
  • Are often accompanied by high winds in the Prairies, Arctic, northern Ontario and northern Quebec.
  • Typically bring heavy snowfalls in British Columbia, the Atlantic Provinces, southern and eastern Quebec and areas near the Great Lakes.
  • May include a wind chill “warning”, issued when very cold temperatures (-35°C or colder) combined with wind could create outdoor conditions hazardous to human activity.
  • Can give rise to a wind storm warning when winds are expected to reach a steady speed of between 65-75 km/h, or 90-100 km/h in gusts.
  • Can leave heavy snowfall that can cause roof failures or collapses.

What to do

  • If a blizzard or heavy blowing snow is forecast, you may want to string a safety line between your house and any other structures or buildings in case you have to go to them during the storm.
  • When a winter storm hits, stay indoors. If you must go outside, dress for the weather. Outer clothing should be tightly woven and water-repellent. The jacket should have a hood. Wear mittens – they are warmer than gloves – and a hat, as significant body heat is lost through the head.
  • In wide-open areas, visibility is limited during heavy blowing snow or a blizzard. You can easily lose your way. If a blizzard strikes, do not try to walk to another building unless there is a rope to guide you or something you can follow.
  • If you must travel during a winter storm, do so during the day and let someone know your route and arrival time.
  • If your car gets stuck in a blizzard or snowstorm, stay in your car. Allow fresh air in your car by opening the window slightly on the sheltered side – away from the wind. You can run the car engine about 10 minutes every half-hour if the exhaust system is not blocked with snow. Check the exhaust pipe periodically to make sure it is not blocked. Remember: you can't smell potentially fatal carbon monoxide fumes.
  • To keep your hands and feet warm, exercise them periodically. In general, it is a good idea to keep moving to avoid falling asleep. If you do try to shovel the snow from around your car, avoid overexerting yourself. Overexertion in the bitter cold can cause death as a result of hypothermia from sweating or a heart attack.
  • If snow is excessive or a roof shows signs of distress, contact a professional who is experienced in safe snow removal procedures. Unsafe procedures may cause personal injury and structural damage. Prevent access to areas under roofs where snow could fall.
  • If you live on a farm, shelter animals. Generally, if the structure is sound, animals should be placed indoors. Once they are inside, secure all openings to the outside. Water supplies should be checked to ensure they have not frozen.

Hurricanes

Hurricanes are violent tropical storms. These extreme storms occur when winds revolve around a centre of low pressure. In the centre, called the eye, there is often a calm area of blue sky.

Hurricanes:

  • Occasionally hit eastern Canada, usually between June and November (September is the peak month).
  • Are bigger and cause more widespread damage than tornadoes (a very large system can be up to 1,000 kilometers wide).
  • Wield very strong winds – of at least 120 kilometers per hour – around the “eye” accompanied by torrential rains.
  • Can bring heavy rain and cause significant flooding.
  • Can often be tracked several days in advance of landfall.
  • Usually move slowly and can batter communities for several hours.

What to do

  • During hurricane season, pay attention to weather forecasts and warnings.
  • If you live on the coast or in a low-lying area near the coast, move inland and to higher ground. The high winds create huge waves at sea which can be very damaging when combined with a storm surge (see Storm Surges section).
  • Do not go down to the water to watch the storm. Most fatalities during hurricanes occur as a result of being caught in large waves, storm surges or flood waters.
  • If the eye of the hurricane passes over, there will be a lull in the wind lasting from several minutes to half an hour. Stay in a safe place. Make emergency repairs only and remember that once the eye has passed, the winds will return from the opposite direction with possibly even greater force.
  • Listen for reports from authorities on your crank or battery powered radio.
  • On a farm, it may be better to leave livestock unsheltered. During past hurricanes some animals left outside suffered less injury than those in shelters, which were injured by collapsing structures and flying objects that may have been avoided outside.

Ice storms

Freezing rain occurs when raindrops fall from a warm layer of air into air that is below freezing and become supercooled. When the supercooled droplets strike a surface below 0°C they instantly freeze, forming a layer of ice.

Ice storms:

  • Freezing rain can occur anywhere in the country, but is particularly common in Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic provinces.
  • Remember that ice, branches or power lines can continue to break and fall for several hours after the end of the precipitation.

What to do

  • Ice from freezing rain accumulates on branches, power lines and buildings. If you must go outside when a significant amount of ice has accumulated, pay attention to branches or wires that could break due to the weight of the ice and fall on you.
  • Never approach power lines. A hanging power line could be charged (live) and you could be electrocuted. Stay back at least 10 meters (33 feet) from wires or anything in contact with them.
  • When freezing rain is forecast, avoid driving if possible. Even a small amount of freezing rain can make roads extremely slippery. Wait several hours after freezing rain ends so that road maintenance crews have enough time to spread sand or salt on icy roads.
  • Rapid onsets of freezing rain combined with strong winds increase the chances for hypothermia. If you live on a farm, move livestock promptly to shelter where feed is available. Forage is often temporarily inaccessible during and immediately after ice storms.

Storm surges

A storm surge is an abnormally high coastal water level caused by strong winds and low air pressure during storms.

Storm surges:

  • Occur on all of Canada's coasts, including those of the Great Lakes.
  • Occur with severe storms such as hurricanes, blizzards, and ice storms.
  • Can damage buildings, docks, boats and other structures near the shoreline.

What to do

  • Your property may be prone to flooding from storm surges. If so, do not store valuables and emergency equipment in your basement or lower floor. Consider removing exterior doors and windows to your basement and sealing holes and cracks.
  • Consider securing small structures such as cottages and mobile homes to a foundation to prevent them from being floated off their footings. If possible, seek shelter in a more secure building.
  • Storm surges are predictable and are typically forecast as part of coastal storm warnings. Monitor weather forecasts.
  • If flooding is predicted, be prepared to turn off household power and gas. Evacuate when instructed to do so by local authorities.

Thunderstorms, lightning and hail

Thunderstorms are often accompanied by high winds, hail, lightning, heavy rain and in rare cases can produce tornadoes. Hail is formed when updrafts in thunderclouds carry raindrops upward into extremely cold areas of the atmosphere, where they freeze and merge into lumps of ice.

Thunderstorms, lightning and hail:

  • Thunderstorms and lightning occur throughout Canada but less frequently in the North. On average, 10 people die each year in Canada and up to 160 are injured during such storms.
  • Thunderstorms are usually over within an hour, although a series of thunderstorms can last several hours.
  • Hailstorms occur across Canada, mostly from May to October. They are most frequent in Alberta, the southern Prairies and in southern Ontario.
  • Some hailstones are the size of peas while others can be as big as grapefruits.
  • Hail comes down at great speed, especially when accompanied by high winds and can cause serious injuries and damages.

What to do if outside

  • If you are caught outside and you can see lightning or hear thunder, you are in danger of being hit. Seek shelter immediately either in an enclosed building or a hard-topped vehicle. There is no safe place outside in a thunderstorm.
  • If caught outside far from a safe location, stay away from tall objects, such as trees, poles, wires and fences. Take shelter in a low lying area.
  • Wait 30 minutes after the last rumble of thunder before going outside again.

What to do if inside

  • Before a severe thunderstorm, unplug radios, televisions and appliances (especially those that may start up automatically when the power is restored). Listen for weather updates on your wind-up or battery-powered radio.
  • If you need to use the phone during a thunderstorm use a cordless phone.
  • Stay away from items that may conduct electricity, such as corded telephones, appliances, sinks, bathtubs, radiators and metal pipes.
  • Consult our “Power Outages – What to do?” publication for more information.
  • If hail is forecast, protect your vehicle by putting it in the garage or other enclosed space.
  • Take cover when hail begins to fall. Do not go out to cover plants, cars or garden furniture.
  • When a hailstorm hits, stay indoors, and keep yourself and your pets away from windows, glass doors and skylights which can shatter if hit by hailstones.

Warning signs of a potential tornado

  • Severe thunderstorms.
  • An extremely dark sky, sometimes highlighted by green or yellow clouds.
  • A rumbling or a whistling sound caused by flying debris.
  • A funnel cloud at the rear base of a thundercloud, often behind a curtain of heavy rain or hail.

What to do

In all cases

  • Get as close to the ground as possible, protect your head and watch for flying debris.
  • Do not chase tornadoes – they are unpredictable and can change course abruptly.
  • A tornado is deceptive. It may appear to be standing still but may in fact be moving toward you.

In a house

  • Go to the basement or take shelter in a small interior ground floor room such as a bathroom, closet or hallway.
  • If you have no basement, protect yourself by taking shelter under a heavy table or desk.
  • In all cases, stay away from windows, outside walls and doors.

On a farm

  • If your personal safety is not at risk, you may have time to open routes of escape for your livestock. Open the gate, if necessary, and then exit the area in a direction perpendicular to the expected path of the tornado.

In a recreational vehicle or mobile home

  • Find shelter elsewhere, preferably in a building with a strong foundation.
  • If no shelter is available, crouch down in a ditch away from the mobile home or recreational vehicle. Beware of flooding from downpours and be prepared to move.

In a high rise building

  • Take shelter in an inner hallway or room, ideally in the basement or on the ground floor.
  • Do not use the elevator.
  • Stay away from windows.

In a gymnasium, church or auditorium

  • Large buildings with wide-span roofs may collapse if a tornado hits.
  • If you are in one of these buildings and cannot leave, take cover under a sturdy structure such as a table or desk.

In a vehicle

  • If you spot a tornado in the distance go to the nearest solid shelter.
  • If the tornado is close, get out of your car and take cover in a low-lying area, such as a ditch.
  • Do not take shelter under an overpass or a bridge. Winds can accelerate under an overpass or a bridge and cause injury or death from flying debris.

Step 2: Make an emergency plan

Every Canadian household needs an emergency plan. It will help you and your family to know what to do in case of an emergency. Remember, your family may not be together when a storm or other emergency occurs. Identify safe places where everyone should meet if they have to leave home during an emergency.

Start by discussing what could happen and what you should do at home, at school or at work if a severe storm strikes. To be prepared, make a list of what needs to be done ahead of time. Store important family documents, such as birth certificates, passports, wills, financial documents, insurance policies, etc. in waterproof container(s). Identify an appropriate out-of-town contact that can act as a central point of contact in an emergency.

Write down and exercise your plan with the entire family at least once a year. Make sure everybody has a copy and keeps it close at hand.

For more information on making an emergency plan, call 1-800-O-Canada or visit GetPrepared.ca to download or complete an emergency plan online.

Step 3: Get an emergency kit

In an emergency you will need some basic supplies. You may need to get by without power or tap water. Be prepared to be self-sufficient for at least 72 hours.

You may have some of the items already, such as a flashlight, battery-operated radio, food and water. The key is to make sure they are organized and easy to find. Would you be able to find your flashlight in the dark?

Make sure your kit is easy to carry. Keep it in a backpack, duffel bag or suitcase with wheels, in an easy-to-reach, accessible place, such as your front hall closet. Make sure everyone in the household knows where the emergency kit is.

Basic emergency kit

  • Water – at least two litres of water per person per day. Include small bottles that can be carried easily in case of an evacuation order.
  • Food that won't spoil, such as canned food, energy bars and dried foods (remember to replace food and water once a year).
  • Manual can opener.
  • Crank or battery-powered flashlight (and extra batteries).
  • Crank or battery-powered radio (and extra batteries).
  • First aid kit.
  • Special items such as prescription medications, infant formula, equipment for people with disabilities.
  • Extra keys to your car and house
  • Some cash in smaller bills, such as $10 bills and change for payphones
  • A copy of your emergency plan and contact information

Floods/Storms

7/2/2018 (Permalink)

Floods

Failing to evacuate flooded areas, entering flood waters, or remaining after a flood has passed can result in injury or death. Flooding is a temporary overflow of water onto land that is normally dry. Floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States. Floods may:

  • Result from rain, snow, coastal storms, storm surges, and overflows of dams and other water systems.

  • Develop slowly or quickly – Flash floods can come with no warning.

  • Cause outages, disrupt transportation, damage buildings, and create landslides.

 IF YOU ARE UNDER A FLOOD WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

    • Just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.

  • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

  • Determine how best to protect yourself based on the type of flooding.

    • Evacuate if told to do so.

    • Move to higher ground or a higher floor.

    • Stay where you are.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A FLOOD THREATENS

WHAT TO DO NOW: Prepare

  • Know types of flood risk in your area. Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center for information.

  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.

  • If flash flooding is a risk in your location, then monitor potential signs, such as heavy rain.

  • Learn and practice evacuation routes, shelter plans, and flash flood response.

  • Gather supplies in case you have to leave immediately, or if services are cut off. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets. Obtain extra batteries and charging devices for phones and other critical equipment.

  • Purchase or renew a flood insurance policy. It typically takes up to 30 days for a policy to go into effect and can protect the life you've built. Homeowner’s policies do not cover flooding. Get flood coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)

  • Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies.

  • Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.

WHAT TO DO DURING: Survive

  • Depending on where you are, and the impact and the warning time of flooding, go to the safe location that you previously identified.
  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown!
  • Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.
  • If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, then stay inside. If water is rising inside the vehicle, then seek refuge on the roof.
  • If trapped in a building, then go to its highest level. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising floodwater. Go on the roof only if necessary. Once there, signal for help.

WHAT TO DO AFTER: Be Safe

  • Listen to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
  • Avoid driving, except in emergencies.
  • Snakes and other animals may be in your house. Wear heavy gloves and boots during clean up.
  • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows.


    Ref. sec. Ready.gov

Emergency Managagment

7/2/2018 (Permalink)

Emergency Management

WINS (Warning Information Notification System)

WINS (Warning Information Notification System) is a public service alert system that includes over 150 categories of weather, emergency and non-emergency alerts. WINS notifications are sent to your home phone, smartphone, TTY, email or text messages by county departments, townships, villages and cities within St. Clair County. YOU choose the alert types and delivery methods that are important to you and your family. A couple of helpful tips when signing up:

  1. Please ensure that you open each category using the “+” symbol to see each alert type within the category. The weather category alone includes 32 types of alerts and you can select which are important to you.
  2. When in the weather category, please ensure that you set your “do not disturb between” hours for non-emergency weather alerts. You will receive emergency weather alerts such as Tornado warnings regardless of your “do not disturb between” hours.
  3. Put in the addresses that are important to you. Because this system allows agencies to target their information in emergency situations, only people who have an address listed in the immediate area will receive emergency alerts. Please ensure you input the addresses that are important to you. You can have up to five addresses including home, work, school or other.

If you have any questions about the Warning Information Notification System, please contact the Office of St. Clair County Homeland Security and Emergency Management at (810) 989-6965.


Contact InformationOffice of Homeland Security / Emergency Management
295 Airport Drive
Kimball, MI 48074

Phone:(810) 989-6965Fax:(810) 364-4603Email:Emergency Management

Why choose SERVPRO for your Storm damage needs

11/24/2017 (Permalink)

Call (586)336-7373 SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo when the storm subsides. Our Highly Trained Cleaning and Restoration Specialists are available 24/7.

Our Technicians are trained in property damage restoration at SERVPRO’s Corporate Training Facility and have IICRC industry certifications.  You can be certain our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. 

All of our training programs include the following:

  • IICRC Training
  • Employee Certification Training
  • Initial Franchise Training
  • e-Learnings
  • Continuing Education Classes

IICRC Training and Certification

The Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) certifies and sets the standards for the cleaning and restoration industries. Our Professionals study IICRC standards and best practices in water restoration, fire restoration, mold remediation, carpet and upholstery cleaning, and other cleaning and restoration courses.

Employee Certification Training

The Employee Certification Training is a voluntary, self-paced program designed for SERVPRO Franchise employees. Certification is awarded after successful completion of course materials and an examination. Modules include:

  • Crew Training
  • Fire Restoration
  • Water Restoration
  • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

Initial Franchise Training

A 15-day hands-on course at the SERVPRO Corporate Training Facility is the foundation of the SERVPRO training program. This course is primarily for new Franchise owners and covers many restoration topics:

  • Fire Restoration
  • Water Restoration
  • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
  • Mold Mitigation

e-Learnings

All of our staff have access to web-based training. This voluntary program is designed to be an ongoing, self-paced coaching series for a Franchise's employees. Video presentations and support materials are followed by a knowledge test at the end of each module. This keeps our technicians and office staff up to speed on industry standards and the professional quality you expect.

Continuing Education Classes

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo offers both credit and noncredit courses for insurance agents, insurance adjusters, real estate professionals, and Franchise staff. These programs are designed to improve knowledge of emergency mitigation. Courses include:

  • Water Damage Restoration
  • Fire Damage Restoration
  • Understanding Mold in the Restoration Industry
  • Restorative Drying for Loss Control
  • Mitigation Awareness Response Seminar (non-credit course)

About Our Storm Restoration Services

8/16/2017 (Permalink)

No Job Is Too Large

The SERVPRO Commercial Large Loss Division is composed of our best of the best in restoration. Our elite large-loss specialists are prequalified and strategically positioned throughout the United States to handle any size disaster.

Every large loss is supervised by a commercial operations manager to help ensure seamless communication and timely mitigation.

At SERVPRO, the difference is our ability to dispatch trained production professionals and cut costs through the strategic placement and oversight of temporary labor. Get the professionals, call SERVPRO.

Clients for the Commercial Large Loss program include the following:

  • The Hospitality Industry
  • Property Managers
  • Universities
  • Municipalities
  • The Pentagon

Should a storm or major event strike, call SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo at (586)-336-7373

Catastrophic Storm and Major Event Response

The SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team can provide help whether you're dealing with a tornado, hurricane, blizzard or flood. The SERVPRO System has a network of strategically positioned storm teams on standby should a disaster strike near you. Available 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are prepared for the unpredictable.

With the ability to mobilize local command centers, along with the resources of more than 1,700 Franchises nationwide, no disaster is too big. Recent mobilizations of the Catastrophic Storm Response Teams include:

  • 2014 Polar Vortex
  • 2012 Sandy
  • 2010 Nashville floods
  • 2008 Ike
  • 2007 Chicago floods
  • 2007 Ohio floods
  • 2007 California wildfires
  • 2005 Katrina/Wilma/Rit

How To Prepare for a Storm

8/10/2017 (Permalink)

Pick up basic survival items. You should have enough supplies to survive without leaving your house for a few days, as well as tools to help you leave if necessary. Stock up on these necessities: A shovel, flashlight, candles, non-perishable food, bottled water, etc 

Keep yourself warm. Losing heat is definitely uncomfortable, but you can survive it. Here's what to do:
  • Stop your pipes from freezing. Before you settle into a nest of blankets, go around your house and turn on every faucet so that it's dripping just slightly. Keeping the water moving through the pipes should help prevent them from freezing.
  • Seal up any drafts. Put towels at the bottom of any doors that have a gap, or around loose windows. If your windows are single-paned, close the curtains or pin a blanket up over them to keep the heat in.
  • Dress in layers. Put on a thin layer of cotton clothing close to your skin, and cover as much as your body as you can. For ladies, consider putting on a pair of tights. On top of that, wear as many layers as you need to keep warm, finishing with warm woolen socks and a sweatshirt or coat with a hood.
  • Wear a hood. You lose a lot of heat from the top of your head, so keep it covered. If you don't have hooded clothing, wrap a scarf or towel around your head.
  • Stay in bed. Put as many covers as you have left over onto your bed, and hop in. Keeping your body heat in an enclosed space like the sheets will help you stay as warm as possible.

Stay updated. Having current information is vital in an emergency, so make arrangements to stay informed.

  • Watch updates on the news or listen to the radio for as long as you can before power goes out.
  • Use social media for updates. If you don't have access to a battery-operated radio, follow national and local disaster agencies (such as FEMA) on Facebook and Twitter. Check periodically for updates.
  • Use SMS messaging if land-line service is down. You can send an SMS via basic text messaging, or through Twitter updates. Get the phone numbers or Twitter handles of all your family members, and make sure they know how to reach you.

Wikihow 

Emergency Notification System

7/24/2017 (Permalink)

St Clair County Emergency Management Update

St Clair Co Emergency Management Department is now offering a notification system for all residents.

WINS (Warning Information Notification System) is a public service alert system that includes over 150 categories of weather, emergency and non-emergency alerts. WINS notifications are sent to your home phone, smartphone, TTY, email or text messages by county departments, townships, villages and cities within St. Clair County. YOU choose the alert types and delivery methods that are important to you and your family. A couple of helpful tips when signing up:

  1. Please ensure that you open each category using the “+” symbol to see each alert type within the category. The weather category alone includes 32 types of alerts and you can select which are important to you.
  2. When in the weather category, please ensure that you set your “do not disturb between” hours for non-emergency weather alerts. You will receive emergency weather alerts such as Tornado warnings regardless of your “do not disturb between” hours.
  3. Put in the addresses that are important to you. Because this system allows agencies to target their information in emergency situations, only people who have an address listed in the immediate area will receive emergency alerts. Please ensure you input the addresses that are important to you. You can have up to five addresses including home, work, school or other.

If you have any questions about the Warning Information Notification System, please contact the Office of St. Clair County Homeland Security and Emergency Management at (810) 989-6965.

BE READY, STAY INFORMED

St Clair County Introduces New Storm Program

7/10/2017 (Permalink)

St Clair County's Emergency Management Department announced a new storm warning program. The SKYWARN program is a part of the St. Clair County ARES/RACES organization.

The National Weather Service (NWS) utilizes trained personnel in the field to provide timely and accurate reports of storm activity from various locations that can supplement the NWS radar network.

In the SKYWARN program, there are over 50 trained weather spotters available to report weather conditions to the Emergency Operations Center. These individuals come from many walks of life, some utilizing amateur radios while other will utilize cell phones as their reporting methods. Many of the spotters are equipped with pagers to insure prompt notification of weather warnings. In addition to the SKYWARN spotter system, many of our local fire departments place apparatus in key locations to assist in providing weather information. Local residents  now will have the potential to receive earlier notification of life threatening weather situations.

Storm Damage

6/9/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Storm Damage A winter storm caused damaged to a customers roof and water leaked into the home affecting several rooms.

Thunderstorms, tornadoes, hailstorms and hurricanes can tear shingles from your roof or cause more severe damage. After a storm you should always check for storm damage to your roof

• Inspect your attic for leaks or water damage. Also, if any water stains appear on your ceiling or walls, this is a sign that you have a leak and need repairs.

• Look for other signs of storm damage from the ground. Check for missing shingles, missing fascia, or damaged gutters. Also, assess the condition of your exhaust pipes, valleys, outer edges or angles of the roof.

• Some damage may be obvious, such as a tree falling on your roof. In this case, stay out of your home until a professional can determine whether any structural damage occurred. Call SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo at (586) 336-7373 to assess any structural damage or repair work.

• If the storm produced hail, check for damage to your siding as well. Hail damage commonly comes in the forms of dimples, made by smaller chunks of hail that pound the outer layer of shingles.

• Stay safe!

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is Here to Help 24/7. Call us at (586) 336-7373

When Storms or Floods hit St. Clair County, SERVPRO is ready!

10/4/2016 (Permalink)

Do You Have Storm or Flood Damage? Please Call Us Today 586-336-7373

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit St. Clair County, we can scale our resources to handle any size storm or flooding disaster. If necessary, we can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and the elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is here to help 24 hours a day.

Call us today at 586-336-7373