Recent Fire Damage Posts

Fire Danger and Prevention during the Holidays

12/16/2022 (Permalink)

Tree Fire Tree fire in home (Photo from: https://www.wpi.edu/news/seasonal-safety-wpi-fire-protection-engineering-researchers-show-dangers-dry-and-neglected)

Each year in the United States, Firefighters respond to an average of 200 Christmas tree fires during the holidays. Additionally, with so many candles being lit during this time of year, more than 1,600 candle fires are started each December, with a majority of them occurring on Christmas Day. Because these dangerous events occur during such a cheerful time and have the chance to ruin the time between families, we at SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo wanted to give you some tips on how to keep your home safe during Christmas. 

  • First off, remember, when using a real tree, make sure it’s fresh and watered, as a dry tree burns very quickly and can bring the entire room to a blaze in just minutes. A well watered tree will give one time to assess the situation if a tree fire even occurs at all.
  • Secondly, make sure lights are up to proper safety standards and aren’t frayed or broken in any way as an exposed wire can cause the tree to catch fire. Additionally, turn off the lights when you leave the house or go to sleep, only keeping them on when needed.
  • Third of all, if candles are lit, make sure they are left in sight, away from areas that can catch fire easily, and out of the reach of children or pets. With candles causing so many fires and deaths during this time of year, it is very important to utilize them in a safe way.
  • Lastly, make sure to dispose of the tree after the holidays. As the days pass, and the tree dies out, it becomes dry and extremely flammable, making it a severe hazard to the home and those who live in it.

While the intention of this is not to spread fear around during the most jolly time of year, the aim is to inform individuals to be mindful and vigilant to their surroundings to avoid dangerous situations from occurring. If a fire unfortunately does break out in your home and when the smoke clears, us at SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo are ready to serve you and your family 24/7 to assess the damages done to your home and make it look brand new. If or when disaster strikes, call us at (586) 336-7373 and we’ll be on the scene to make the crisis seem “Like it never even happened.”

All About Fire Damage Restoration

11/4/2022 (Permalink)

After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire and smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals have the specialized fire restoration training needed to restore your home to pre-fire condition.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?

Call Today: (586) 336-7373

Every fire damage event is a little different, and requires a unique solution, but the general process stays the same. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage emergency.

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call the SERVPRO Customer Care Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our specialist will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Franchise Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

The SERVPRO Franchise Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Fire Safety

2/25/2022 (Permalink)

FIRE SAFETY TIPS

Every year 5,500 Americans die in fires and more than 30,000 are injured. Most fire deaths occur in the home and many can be prevented. Your local fire departments work to keep citizens informed and practiced in fire safety training. To protect yourself and your family it is important to understand the basic characteristics of fire.

  • Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or make a phone call.
  • In two minutes a fire can become life threatening. In five minutes a house can be engulfed in flames.
  • Fire's heat and smoke are more dangerous than the flames. Inhaling the super-hot air can sear your lungs.
  • Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy.
  • Request an inspection of your home or business by your local fire department.
  • Install smoke detectors. Place detectors on the ceiling or high on the wall of every level of your house, outside bedrooms, at the top of open stairways, at the bottom of enclosed stairs, and near (but not in) the kitchen.
  • Clean and test smoke detectors once a month and replace batteries at least twice a year.
  • Install a fire extinguisher in your home and teach family members how to use it.
  • Plan two escape routes from every room in your home or office. Choose a place outside for everyone to meet after escaping from a fire.
  • Have a practice fire drill at least once a year; teach children how to report a fire, and when to use 911.
  • Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken the household in case of fire. Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer) when escaping from a fire.
  • Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
  • Make sure windows are not nailed or painted shut.
  • Safeguard your home against fires by keeping storage areas clean, check wiring and outlets, and use caution with flammable liquids and materials.

Follow these steps after a fire

2/1/2022 (Permalink)

Follow these steps after a house fire

  1. Call your insurance agent immediately.You will be getting calls at all hours of the day from public adjusters and contractors who will try to offer you a deal on putting your house back together. These calls can create a lot of stress and confusion. I suggest you speak to no one but your agent to discuss your options at this point in the process.
  2. Contact your local SERVPROof Marine City/ Romeo Immediately after a fire @ 586-336-7373, especially if it is a minor one, you’ll need to clean up any soot or water damage. SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo professionals can also arrange restoration with contractors on hand.
  3. Separate damaged property from undamaged property.The insurance company will need a detailed inventory list from you after they inspect the loss. Separating your damaged property from your undamaged property will make it easier for you to make a list of your damaged items. This list needs to include the date you purchased each item, the brand name, the price you paid, and the serial number, model, or description of each item. If the item was a gift, be sure to indicate that as well.

It’s a good idea to submit your receipts with this inventory list. If the receipts were destroyed in the fire, or you didn’t keep any receipts, request copies of prior bank statements. This can make obtaining duplicate receipts easier. Keep in mind that photos of any damaged items are always helpful if receipts are not available.

  1. Save undamaged property from further destruction.Any items that are not damaged should be put in a safe place, even if it means putting them in storage. Insurance adjusters are typically fair when it comes to adding additional costs for storage.
  2. Cooperate fully with the insurance company’s investigation.When a fire claim is reported to an insurance company, it is given top priority. Usually the adjusters come out to see the loss within 24 to 48 hours. To help settle your claim in a timely manner and to your satisfaction, be sure you are available and on time for all meetings, that you return calls promptly, that any requested paperwork is completed as quickly as possible, and that you contact the company or your agent immediately with any questions.
  3. Find somewhere to stay if you can’t live in your home. Most homeowner’s policies include “Loss of Use or Loss of Rents” coverage, which will pay for the food, clothing, and shelter that you and your family may need for a specified period of time. Keep in mind that your policy will pay for “like kind and quality” living arrangements. 

SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo 586-336-7373

Fire Restoration Process

12/1/2021 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Restoration Process

After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire and smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals have the specialized fire restoration training needed to restore your home to pre-fire condition.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Today 586-336-7373

Every fire damage event is a little different, and requires a unique solution, but the general process stays the same. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage emergency.

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call the SERVPRO Customer Care Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our specialist will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Franchise Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

The SERVPRO Franchise Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

CHRISTMAS TREE SAFETY TIPS

11/30/2021 (Permalink)

Did you know that Christmas trees alone result in 13 million dollars, annually, in property damage? More importantly, these fires present real risk towards family and friends. When showcasing a live tree in your home, the combination of tree dryness, electrical malfunction with lights and poorly located heating sources can make for a deadly combination.

IF YOUR HOLIDAY IS JUST NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT A LIVE TREE,

FOLLOW THESE SAFETy PRECAUTIONS TO KEEP THREATS AT BAY:

  • Fresh trees are less likely to catch fire, so look for a tree with vibrant green needles that are hard to pluck and don’t break easily from its branches. The tree shouldn’t be shedding its needles readily.
  • Always place your tree away from heat sources like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights, and keep the tree base filled with water to avoid a dry out.
  • Make sure all your indoor and outdoor Christmas lights have been tested in a lab by the UL or ETL/ITSNA for safety, and throw out any damaged lights.
  • Any lights you use outdoors must be labeled suitable for exterior placement, and be sure to plug them into a ground-fault circuit interrupter protected receptacle.
  • Keep all your holiday candles away from your Christmas tree, surrounding furniture and décor.
  • Bedtime means lights off. DO NOT FORGET to turn your Christmas tree lights off each night.

When your tree begins to drop its needles, it’s time to say goodbye to your evergreen foliage until next year. So this year, follow our guidelines to avoid being another statistic in the National Fire Protection Association or United States Fire Administration report during the upcoming holiday season.

Fire Damage Restoration Process

11/2/2021 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Restoration Process
After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire and smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals have the specialized fire restoration training needed to restore your home to pre-fire condition.
Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Today 586-336-7373
Every fire damage event is a little different, and requires a unique solution, but the general process stays the same. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage emergency.
Step 1: Emergency Contact
The restoration process begins when you call the SERVPRO Customer Care Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our specialist will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Franchise Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.
Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment
Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.
Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service
Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.
Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)
The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.
Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces
The SERVPRO Franchise Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.
Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing
They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.
Step 7: Restoration
Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Fire Damage and Emergency Tips

11/1/2021 (Permalink)

Fire Damage and Emergency Tips

After any fire damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

Have A Fire or Smoke Damage Emergency?
Call 
SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373

What To Do After A Fire

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keep hands clean so as not to further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator and prop doors open.
  • Clean and protect chrome with light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.
  • Wash houseplants on both sides of leaves.
  • Change HVAC filter.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers.

What NOT To Do After A Fire

  • Don't attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces or shampoo carpet or upholstery without contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional. 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
  • Don't attempt to clean any electrical appliances that may have been close to fire, heat or water without consulting an authorized repair service.
  • Don't use any canned or packaged food or beverages that may have been stored near the fire, heat or water.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. The wiring may be damaged.
  • Don't send garments to an ordinary dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor.

Fire Pit Safety

10/13/2021 (Permalink)

Whether you already have a fire pit or are planning to add one, invest some effort in reviewing fire pit safety. This is especially important if you’re new to using a fire pit. It only takes a second for a cozy fire to burst into a blazing inferno. Ensure you get the most enjoyment from your fire pit by keeping family and friends safe.

Fire pit safety starts with selecting the right site. Make sure the ground is level, especially when using a portable fire pit. Keep fires located at least 10 to 20 feet away from surrounding plants, as well as from nearby buildings, including your home. Check with your local city and county authorities to make sure you observe the distance required by law.

Never operate your fire pit beneath a building overhang or in a partially enclosed space. Use special caution related to overhanging trees, which can easily ignite from flying wood-fire sparks. In fire-prone areas, surround your fire pit with non-combustible materials, like crushed stone, brick, or sand.

In wood-stoked fire pits, safety begins with fuel. Only burn wood that’s been seasoned at least six months. Avoid using construction materials, such as plywood or composite woods, which can release toxic fumes when burned. Softwoods, like pine and birch, tend to produce more crackles and sparks than seasoned hardwoods, like oak or hickory. For wood-burning fire pits, cut logs so their length is less than three-quarters the diameter of the pit. Never use lighter fluid or gasoline to start a fire in a fire pit.

If your fire pit has a screen, use it whenever you’re burning. It’s also a good idea to have a bucket of sand or garden hose handy to deal with wayward sparks from wood fires. Attach a hose-end multi-pattern nozzle to the hose, setting it to “spray.” A shower-type spray douses a flare up, while a direct stream of water can spread sparks. Keep fire gloves nearby to handle hot parts of the fire pit safely.

Position chairs so folks can rise and move about seats without risking tumbling into the fire. Built-in seating prevents seats from being drawn too close to the flames; so do heavier chairs. Keep an eye on children whenever a fire pit is being used. Don’t allow them to get too close to the blaze. 

Invest in a fire blanket to help extinguish sparks, the fire, and, if necessary, anyone who might catch fire. Also have a fully charged, dry-chemical fire extinguisher on hand with a Class B and C or multipurpose rating. Make sure you understand the effective range, which is typically 6 to 10 feet, and know how to use it properly. On gas fire pits, turn off the gas before attempting to extinguish a fire. Avoid lighting a fire in windy conditions.

When you’re done enjoying your fire for the evening, douse it properly. Most manufactured fire pits offer specific instructions for extinguishing a fire. Review the instructions before it’s time to put out your fire. Water can crack ceramic fire pits and some metal ones.

Fire Prevention Week October 3-9 2021

10/1/2021 (Permalink)

Learn The Sounds Of Fire Safety.

Frequently Asked Questions about smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms

What’s the difference between smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms? Why do I need both?
Smoke alarms sense smoke well before you can, alerting you to danger. In the event of fire, you may have as little as 2 minutes to escape safely, which is why smoke alarms need to be in every bedroom, outside of the sleeping areas (like a hallway), and on each level (including the basement). Do not put smoke alarms in your kitchen or bathrooms.

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that displaces oxygen in your body and brain and can render you unconscious before you even realize something is happening to you. Without vital oxygen, you are at risk of death from carbon monoxide poisoning in a short time. CO alarms detect the presence of carbon monoxide and alert you so you can get out, call 9-1-1, and let the professionals check your home.

How do I know which smoke and CO alarm to choose for my home?
Choose an alarm that is listed with a testing laboratory, meaning it has met certain standards for protection. Whether you select a unit that requires yearly changing of batteries, or a 10-year unit that you change out at the end of the 10 years, either will provide protection.

CO alarms also have a battery backup. Choose one that is listed with a testing laboratory. For the best protection, use combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarms that are interconnected throughout the home. These can be installed by a qualified electrician, so that when one sounds, they all sound. This ensures you can hear the alarm no matter where in your home the alarm originates.

Emergency planning for fires in your home.

9/2/2021 (Permalink)

Fires in the home are some of the most dangerous events that can occur. Although we do not like to think about it, they are a possibility, so all family members in your household should know ahead of time what to do in case you experience such an unfortunate event.


1. Have An Escape Plan 
You should first ensure that your entire family knows what to do in case of a fire in your home. Make an escape plan and practice it several times per year with your family. Make sure your family members know not to put their lives in danger to save possessions. Always take the route that gets you outside the fastest. If you must exit through smoke, know to drop down under it and try to cover your mouth to keep from breathing smoke. If a door is hot to the touch, do not open it or go through it. 
 
2. Rope Ladders 
If you live in a two-story home, every bedroom should have a rope ladder which is readily available so family members can climb down outside instead of being trapped. A meeting spot outside your home needs to be designated, and ensure you take attendance, so you know who is out safely. This will keep people from endangering themselves by going back in and looking for someone who is already out. If someone is missing, make sure to alert the firefighters – do not ever reenter the home yourself. 
 
3. Stop, Drop, Roll 
Everyone should know how to do this if fire catches on your clothes. Drop to the ground right away, cross your hands over your chest, and roll forward and back until you smother the flames completely. Cool the area that is burned with water and call for medical attention right away for serious burns. 
 
4. Fire Extinguishers 
Places such as your workshop, fireplace, and kitchen should have fire extinguishers nearby. Every family member should know how to use it as well. Extinguishers need to be regularly recharged, inspected or replaced as necessary. 
 
5. Stove Fires 
A small fire in your kitchen should be able to be handled by all. Suffocate the fire by putting a lid on the pan, turning the stove off and letting the pan sit unmoved until the flames are smothered. Extinguish small grease fires by putting baking soda on them, but do not ever use water. 
 
Call SERVPRO as soon as any fire is out so that they can clean up damages and prevent any further damage from happening. 
 
SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is available to help you clean up fire damage at any time. We know how important it is to act quickly, so the sooner you call us at (586) 336-7373, the sooner we can stop further damage from soot and smoke.

Outdoor Safety

9/1/2021 (Permalink)

OUTDOOR SAFETY TIPS

A FIRE WEATHER WATCH: means warm temperature, and very low humidities, and stronger winds may combine to produce a significantly increased risk of fire danger.

When conditions become very dry, make sure all burn barrels are covered with a weighted metal cover, and  holes, no larger than ¾ of an inch.

Don’t throw your cigarettes or matches out of a moving vehicle. They may ignite dry grass on the side of the road, and produce a wildfire.

Extinguish all outdoor fires properly. Drown fires with plenty of water and stir to make sure everything is cold to the touch. Dunk charcoal in water until cold. Do not throw live charcoal on the ground and leave it. NEVER LEAVE FIRE UNATTENDED. Sparks or embers can blow into leaves or grass and ignite a fire, and quickly spread.

RED FLAG WARNING: means warm temperature, and very low humidities, and stronger winds are expected to combine, and produce and increased risk of fire danger.

If you are able to burn in your area, all burn barrels are to be covered with a metal cover with holed no bigger than ¾ of an inch.

Don’t throw your cigarettes or matches out of a moving vehicle. They may ignite dry grass on the side of the road, and produce a wildfire.

Extinguish all outdoor fires properly. Drown fires with plenty of water and stir to make sure everything is cold to the touch. Dunk charcoal in water until cold. Do not throw live charcoal on the ground and leave it. NEVER LEAVE FIRE UNATTENDED. Sparks or embers can blow into leaves or grass and ignite a fire, and quickly spread.

Fire Management

9/1/2021 (Permalink)

According to St Clair County Emergency Management Department every year 5,500 Americans die in fires and more than 30,000 are injured. Most fire deaths occur in the home and many can be prevented. Your local fire departments work to keep citizens informed and practiced in fire safety training. To protect yourself and your family it is important to understand the basic characteristics of fire.

  • Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or make a phone call.
  • In two minutes a fire can become life threatening. In five minutes a house can be engulfed in flames.
  • Fire's heat and smoke are more dangerous than the flames. Inhaling the super-hot air can sear your lungs.
  • Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy.
  • Request an inspection of your home or business by your local fire department.
  • Install smoke detectors. Place detectors on the ceiling or high on the wall of every level of your house, outside bedrooms, at the top of open stairways, at the bottom of enclosed stairs, and near (but not in) the kitchen.
  • Clean and test smoke detectors once a month and replace batteries at least twice a year.
  • Install a fire extinguisher in your home and teach family members how to use it.
  • Plan two escape routes from every room in your home or office. Choose a place outside for everyone to meet after escaping from a fire.
  • Have a practice fire drill at least once a year; teach children how to report a fire, and when to use 911.
  • Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken the household in case of fire. Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer) when escaping from a fire.
  • Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
  • Make sure windows are not nailed or painted shut.
  • Safeguard your home against fires by keeping storage areas clean, check wiring and outlets, and use caution with flammable liquids and materials.

Fire Safety For Kids

8/4/2021 (Permalink)

Fire Safety for Kids

A home fire is a devastating event, and one that you never count on happening. Your children are most at risk when this disaster occurs. In fact, children under five are twice as likely as other people to die in a home fire. Tragically, many home fires are started by children playing with dangerous household items – especially lighters and matches. Taking sensible precautions in the home and teaching your child how to escape from a fire can help your family avoid this type of heartbreak.   

 Prevent Your Child from Starting Fires

The U.S. Fire Administration estimates that 300 people are killed and $280 million in property is destroyed each year as the result of children playing with fire.

  • Keep matches, lighters and other ignitable substances in a secured location out of your child’s reach. Only use lighters with child-resistant features.
  • Invest in flameless candles. These candles contain a light bulb rather than an open flame, and take the danger out of your child knocking over a candle.

Help Your Child Survive a Fire

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas. 
  • Once a month check whether each alarm in the home is working properly by pushing the test button. 
  • Replace batteries in smoke alarms at least once a year. Immediately install a new battery if an alarm chirps, warning the battery is low.
  • Teach your children what smoke alarms sound like and what to do when they hear one.
  • Ensure that all household members know two ways to escape from every room of your home, and where to meet up outside..
  • Practice your fire escape plan at least twice a year and at different times of the day. Practice waking up to smoke alarms, low crawling and meeting outside. Make sure everyone knows how to call 9-1-1.
  • Emphasize “get out, stay out.” Only professional firefighters should enter a building that is on fire—even if other family members, pets or prized possessions are inside.
  • Use quick-release devices on barred windows and doors. Security bars without release devices can trap you in a deadly fire. If you have security bars on your windows, be sure one window in each sleeping room has a release device.
  • Consider getting escape ladders for sleeping areas on the second or third floor. Learn how to use them, and store them near the windows. 
  • Teach household members to STOP, DROP and ROLL if their clothes should catch on fire.

What is fire damage

8/2/2021 (Permalink)

Definition - What does Fire Damage mean?

Fire damage refers to the physical damage to a property as a result of burning. This damage may either be directly caused by the flames or could occur due to smoke and other corrosive substances emitted by the fire.

In terms of insurance, fire damage is one of the types of coverage offered in property insurance.

Insuranceopedia explains Fire Damage

The six types of fire damage are as follows:

  • Class A: fire that involves flammable solids, such as paper, cloth, wood, and plastics.
  • Class B: fire that involves flammable liquids or solids that can turn into liquids.
  • Class C: fire that involves flammable gasses, such as propane, hydrogen, natural gas, and butane.
  • Class D: fire that involves combustible metals, including sodium, magnesium, and potassium.
  • Class E: fire that involves factors in Class A and B as well as electrical elements.
  • Class F: relatively hotter and more destructive fire that involves cooking oils and fats.

Furthermore, many insurance companies divide fire damage into two categories: primary and secondary. The former refers to damage caused by the flames, while the latter refers to damage caused by smoke or other substances from the fire.

Fire Safety for Kids

7/20/2021 (Permalink)

A home fire is a devastating event, and one that you never count on happening. Your children are most at risk when this disaster occurs. In fact, children under five are twice as likely as other people to die in a home fire. Tragically, many home fires are started by children playing with dangerous household items – especially lighters and matches. Taking sensible precautions in the home and teaching your child how to escape from a fire can help your family avoid this type of heartbreak.   

 Prevent Your Child from Starting Fires

The U.S. Fire Administration estimates that 300 people are killed and $280 million in property is destroyed each year as the result of children playing with fire.

  • Keep matches, lighters and other ignitable substances in a secured location out of your child’s reach. Only use lighters with child-resistant features.
  • Invest in flameless candles. These candles contain a light bulb rather than an open flame, and take the danger out of your child knocking over a candle.

Help Your Child Survive a Fire

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas. 
  • Once a month check whether each alarm in the home is working properly by pushing the test button. 
  • Replace batteries in smoke alarms at least once a year. Immediately install a new battery if an alarm chirps, warning the battery is low.
  • Teach your children what smoke alarms sound like and what to do when they hear one.
  • Ensure that all household members know two ways to escape from every room of your home, and where to meet up outside..
  • Practice your fire escape plan at least twice a year and at different times of the day. Practice waking up to smoke alarms, low crawling and meeting outside. Make sure everyone knows how to call 9-1-1.
  • Emphasize “get out, stay out.” Only professional firefighters should enter a building that is on fire—even if other family members, pets or prized possessions are inside.
  • Use quick-release devices on barred windows and doors. Security bars without release devices can trap you in a deadly fire. If you have security bars on your windows, be sure one window in each sleeping room has a release device.
  • Consider getting escape ladders for sleeping areas on the second or third floor. Learn how to use them, and store them near the windows. 
  • Teach household members to STOP, DROP and ROLL if their clothes should catch on fire.

FIRE SAFETY TIPS

7/20/2021 (Permalink)

Every year 5,500 Americans die in fires and more than 30,000 are injured. Most fire deaths occur in the home and many can be prevented. Your local fire departments work to keep citizens informed and practiced in fire safety training. To protect yourself and your family it is important to understand the basic characteristics of fire.

  • Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or make a phone call.
  • In two minutes a fire can become life threatening. In five minutes a house can be engulfed in flames.
  • Fire's heat and smoke are more dangerous than the flames. Inhaling the super-hot air can sear your lungs.
  • Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy.
  • Request an inspection of your home or business by your local fire department.
  • Install smoke detectors. Place detectors on the ceiling or high on the wall of every level of your house, outside bedrooms, at the top of open stairways, at the bottom of enclosed stairs, and near (but not in) the kitchen.
  • Clean and test smoke detectors once a month and replace batteries at least twice a year.
  • Install a fire extinguisher in your home and teach family members how to use it.
  • Plan two escape routes from every room in your home or office. Choose a place outside for everyone to meet after escaping from a fire.
  • Have a practice fire drill at least once a year; teach children how to report a fire, and when to use 911.
  • Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken the household in case of fire. Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer) when escaping from a fire.
  • Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
  • Make sure windows are not nailed or painted shut.
  • Safeguard your home against fires by keeping storage areas clean, check wiring and outlets, and use caution with flammable liquids and materials.

Fire Damage and Emergency Tips

6/8/2021 (Permalink)

After any fire damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

Have A Fire or Smoke Damage Emergency?
Call 
SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373

What To Do After A Fire

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keep hands clean so as not to further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator and prop doors open.
  • Clean and protect chrome with light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.
  • Wash houseplants on both sides of leaves.
  • Change HVAC filter.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers.

What NOT To Do After A Fire

  • Don't attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces or shampoo carpet or upholstery without contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional. 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
  • Don't attempt to clean any electrical appliances that may have been close to fire, heat or water without consulting an authorized repair service.
  • Don't use any canned or packaged food or beverages that may have been stored near the fire, heat or water.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. The wiring may be damaged.
  • Don't send garments to an ordinary dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor.

Fire Restoration Process

6/8/2021 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Restoration Process

After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire and smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals have the specialized fire restoration training needed to restore your home to pre-fire condition.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Today 586-336-7373

Every fire damage event is a little different, and requires a unique solution, but the general process stays the same. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage emergency.

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call the SERVPRO Customer Care Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our specialist will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Franchise Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

The SERVPRO Franchise Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Fire Damage Restoration Services

5/19/2021 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Restoration Process

After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire and smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals have the specialized fire restoration training needed to restore your home to pre-fire condition.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Today 586-336-7373

Every fire damage event is a little different, and requires a unique solution, but the general process stays the same. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage emergency.

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call the SERVPRO Customer Care Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our specialist will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Franchise Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

The SERVPRO Franchise Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Fire Damage and Emergency Tips

12/14/2020 (Permalink)

Fire Damage and Emergency Tips

After any fire damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

Have A Fire or Smoke Damage Emergency?
Call 
SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo @ 586-336-7373

What To Do After A Fire

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keep hands clean so as not to further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator and prop doors open.
  • Clean and protect chrome with light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.
  • Wash houseplants on both sides of leaves.
  • Change HVAC filter.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers.

What NOT To Do After A Fire

  • Don't attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces or shampoo carpet or upholstery without contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional. 24 hours a day 365 days a year.
  • Don't attempt to clean any electrical appliances that may have been close to fire, heat or water without consulting an authorized repair service.
  • Don't use any canned or packaged food or beverages that may have been stored near the fire, heat or water.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. The wiring may be damaged.
  • Don't send garments to an ordinary dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor.

Create A Fire Safety Plan

12/14/2020 (Permalink)

In the event that you or someone you know has a fire. SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is available to help you. We know how important it is to act quickly, so the sooner you call us at (586) 336-7373, the sooner we can stop any further damage.

Creating a plan ahead of time can you save you time and money in the future. Fires in your home or business are some of the most dangerous and traumatic events that can occur. Although we do not like to think about it, they are a possibility, so everyone should know ahead of time.

Steps to be taken:
1. Have An Escape Plan 
Make an escape plan and practice it several times per year with your family. Make sure your family members know not to put their lives in danger to save possessions. Always take the route that gets you outside the fastest. If you must exit through smoke, know to drop down under it and try to cover your mouth to keep from breathing smoke. If a door is hot to the touch, do not open it or go through it. 
 
2. Rope Ladders 
If you live in a two-story home, every bedroom should have a rope ladder which is readily available so family members can climb down outside instead of being trapped. A meeting spot outside your home needs to be designated, and ensure you take attendance, so you know who is out safely. 
 
3. Stop, Drop, Roll 
Everyone should know how to do this if fire catches on your clothes. Drop to the ground right away, cross your hands over your chest, and roll forward and back until you smother the flames completely. Cool the area that is burned with water and call for medical attention right away for serious burns. 
 
4. Fire Extinguishers 
Places such as your workshop, fireplace, and kitchen should have fire extinguishers nearby. Every family member should know how to use it as well. Extinguishers need to be regularly recharged, inspected or replaced as necessary. 
 
5. Stove Fires 
A small fire in your kitchen should be able to be handled by all. Suffocate the fire by putting a lid on the pan, turning the stove off and letting the pan sit unmoved until the flames are smothered. Extinguish small grease fires by putting baking soda on them, but do not ever use water. 
 

Christmas Tree Safety

11/30/2020 (Permalink)

CHRISTMAS TREE SAFETY TIPS

Did you know that Christmas trees alone result in 13 million dollars, annually, in property damage? More importantly, these fires present real risk towards family and friends. When showcasing a live tree in your home, the combination of tree dryness, electrical malfunction with lights and poorly located heating sources can make for a deadly combination.

IF YOUR HOLIDAY IS JUST NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT A LIVE TREE,

FOLLOW THESE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS TO KEEP THREATS AT BAY:

  • Fresh trees are less likely to catch fire, so look for a tree with vibrant green needles that are hard to pluck and don’t break easily from its branches. The tree shouldn’t be shedding its needles readily.
  • Always place your tree away from heat sources like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights, and keep the tree base filled with water to avoid a dry out.
  • Make sure all your indoor and outdoor Christmas lights have been tested in a lab by the UL or ETL/ITSNA for safety, and throw out any damaged lights.
  • Any lights you use outdoors must be labeled suitable for exterior placement, and be sure to plug them into a ground-fault circuit interrupter protected receptacle.
  • Keep all your holiday candles away from your Christmas tree, surrounding furniture and décor.
  • Bedtime means lights off. DO NOT FORGET to turn your Christmas tree lights off each night.

When your tree begins to drop its needles, it’s time to say goodbye to your evergreen foliage until next year. So this year, follow our guidelines to avoid being another statistic in the National Fire Protection Association or United States Fire Administration report during the upcoming holiday season.

Fireplace Maintenance

11/5/2020 (Permalink)

Enjoying a warm, cozy fire requires a clean, safe fireplace. Here are some tips for keeping it that way:  

  • Fireplaces should not be used as furnaces. Use a fireplace for a short-duration fire — no longer than five hours.
  • Keep the glass open to allow air to be drawn up to cool the chimney, but keep the screen closed to prevent sparks from jumping onto the carpeting.
  • Never leave a fire unattended when children are in the house. Adults, even if near, should not allow children to play near or with fire tools and equipment.
  • Open a window when using the fireplace to prevent the room from becoming smoky. The air coming in from the window will go up the chimney.
  • Before making a fire, open the glass doors, pull aside the screen curtains, and place the kindling, newspaper and logs inside. Next, open the damper and a window. The window needs to be open only a few inches. You can check to make sure the smoke will go up the chimney properly by lighting a match, quickly blowing it out and watching the smoke to see whether it's going up and out.
  • Keep a nonflammable rug (available at fireplace-supply stores) in front of the fireplace so that sparks won't melt or otherwise damage your carpeting.
  • Use fireplace tools to handle burning logs. Never use your hands.
  • Use a chimney cap to prevent water damage, to keep animals from nesting and to keep debris from blocking the chimney and causing carbon monoxide to flow into the house. Use a spark arrester to help prevent sparks from flying out, which could start a fire on the roof or lawn.
  • Glass doors may develop tough stains from flames and heat. To clean them, make sure the glass doors are cool, then scrape off any thick gunk deposits with a razor blade. Add a squirt of liquid dishwashing detergent to a bucket of warm water, or add a cup of vinegar to a gallon of water. Spray or sponge the cleaner on, and then wipe it away with newspaper (which is lint-free). Another option is to buy glass cleaner at a fireplace store.
  • Fireplace coals can remain hot enough to start a fire for up to three days, so always wait at least that long before removing the ashes. At that point, close the damper to prevent cold air in the flue from stirring up excess dust while you're removing the ashes. Be sure to wear a dust mask and open a window in the same room as the fireplace to prevent negative air pressure. Use a shovel to scoop the ashes into a metal container. Store the container far from combustible materials and surfaces and wood floors.
  • Never use a vacuum to clean up ashes, because live coals may remain in those ashes.
  • Have a certified chimney sweep inspect and clean the chimney when necessary. Have him show you how to check it yourself, too. The chimney should be checked at least once a year or after about 80 fires.
  • Shine brass fireplace utensils with Worcestershire sauce and a toothbrush.
  • Clean the firebox (the area where the logs burn) at least once a week during the months you use it, when ash builds up. Leave about an inch of ash because it acts as insulation, allowing the coals to heat faster and retain the heat easier. Keep the firebox completely clean during the months when the fireplace is not in use.
  • To clean an exterior slate hearth, wash, dry and coat it with lemon oil every six weeks to make it shine. For cleaning exterior brick hearths, buy a brick cleaner at a fireplace shop.

Fire Prevention Week October 4-10 2020

10/7/2020 (Permalink)

Why is Fire Safety Awareness Important?

     Every year thousands of people lose their life or get seriously injured due to fire-related hazards. Many of us believe we may never be in the midst of a fire accident. That is not true. A fire can happen anywhere and at any time. The outbreak of a fire, when not handled carefully, can lead to loss of life as well as valuable assets. When dealing with a fire, it is important to remain alert at all times and follow preventive measures to avoid the chances of fire. Fire safety awareness includes assessing the possible risks that can cause a fire hazard and taking appropriate steps to prevent and minimize the damage caused due to a fire. Basic fire safety plans might involve installation of fire safety equipment and marking safe exit points in the building

WHAT IS FIRE SAFETY AWARENESS?

Fire safety awareness means Analyzing the possible risks of fire in your vicinity and taking preventive measures to ensure minimum damage and safe exit of all the person exposed to fire. Different fire safety awareness approaches are adopted at different locations. However, the priority of every approach is the safe and successful evacuation of people trapped in a building in case of a fire. A Well planned and practiced fire safety training can prepare you mentally and physically to keep your mind calm during an emergency situation so that you can take the necessary steps to mitigate the damage.

Why is Fire Safety Awareness Important?

Fires can take lives and destroy property. If one has to handle a fire without damage then he/she must be aware at all the times. One of the key strategies while talking about fire safety awareness is identifying the possible fire hazards around you and making sure that a well thought fire safety plan is in motion as soon as a fire breaks out.

OUTDOOR SAFETY TIPS

9/21/2020 (Permalink)

OUTDOOR SAFETY TIPS

A FIRE WEATHER WATCH: means warm temperature, and very low humidities, and stronger winds may combine to produce a significantly increased risk of fire danger.

When conditions become very dry, make sure all burn barrels are covered with a weighted metal cover, and  holes, no larger than ¾ of an inch.

Don’t throw your cigarettes or matches out of a moving vehicle. They may ignite dry grass on the side of the road, and produce a wildfire.

Extinguish all outdoor fires properly. Drown fires with plenty of water and stir to make sure everything is cold to the touch. Dunk charcoal in water until cold. Do not throw live charcoal on the ground and leave it. NEVER LEAVE FIRE UNATTENDED. Sparks or embers can blow into leaves or grass and ignite a fire, and quickly spread.

RED FLAG WARNING: means warm temperature, and very low humidities, and stronger winds are expected to combine, and produce and increased risk of fire danger.

If you are able to burn in your area, all burn barrels are to be covered with a metal cover with holed no bigger than ¾ of an inch.

Don’t throw your cigarettes or matches out of a moving vehicle. They may ignite dry grass on the side of the road, and produce a wildfire.

Extinguish all outdoor fires properly. Drown fires with plenty of water and stir to make sure everything is cold to the touch. Dunk charcoal in water until cold. Do not throw live charcoal on the ground and leave it. NEVER LEAVE FIRE UNATTENDED. Sparks or embers can blow into leaves or grass and ignite a fire, and quickly spread.

OPEN BURNING IN MICHIGAN

9/8/2020 (Permalink)

Who Regulates Open Burning?

In Michigan, the practice of open burning may be regulated at both the state and local level. Although this document focuses on state regulations, it is important to remember that local ordinances may prohibit the open burning of any material. Contact your municipality and/or township office to find out if local ordinances are more restrictive than the state rules contained in this guide. Burn permits are required for open burning not conducted in burn barrels when the ground is not snow-covered.

Contact your fire department, municipality, or DNR district office for burn permit information.

Remember, you are legally responsible for any fire you start!

Household Waste

Persons may burn solid waste from a one or two family dwelling in an approved container, as long as it is not prohibited by local ordinance, and it does not create a smoke or odor nuisance. Solid waste includes refuse, and garbage generated at a household (grass clippings, leaves, trees, and brush are regulated separately and therefore addressed elsewhere in this fact sheet). An approved container is one constructed of metal or masonry with a metal covering device with openings no larger than ¾ inch.

Trees and Brush

The open burning of trees, logs, brush, and stumps is allowed if it meets the following criteria (unless prohibited by local law):

  1. The burning is conducted further than 1,400 feet from the boundary of an incorporated city or village.
  2. The burning does not violate any other air pollution rules (such as burning that causes a smoke or odor nuisance). A burn permit is required whenever the ground is not snow-covered. Although open burning of trees, logs, brush, and stumps is allowed, it is recommended that you consider other disposal options such as chipping the material for landscaping or compost or using the wood for fuel.

Structures

Structures (such as houses, barns, and sheds) may not be burned for the purpose of demolition. Air quality regulations allow structures to be intentionally burned for the purpose of fire department training ONLY.

Commercial/Industrial Waste

Open burning is not an acceptable disposal method for waste generated at commercial and industrial facilities. Neither solid waste nor air quality regulations allow the open burning of commercial and industrial wastes. Taking commercial or industrial waste to another location (such as a household) to be burned is also prohibited.

Grass Clippings and Leaves

The open burning of grass clippings and leaves produces thick smoke which can be a nuisance and is a health threat to those with respiratory conditions. The burning of grass clippings and leaves is prohibited in municipalities with a population of 7,500 or more, unless the local governing body enacts an ordinance authorizing it.

Fire Prevention Week 2020

9/1/2020 (Permalink)

Fire Prevention Week 2020 in United States will begin on

     Sunday October 4-Saturday October 10

Why is Fire Safety Awareness Important?

     Every year thousands of people lose their life or get seriously injured due to fire-related hazards. Many of us believe we may never be in the midst of a fire accident. That is not true. A fire can happen anywhere and at any time. The outbreak of a fire, when not handled carefully, can lead to loss of life as well as valuable assets. When dealing with a fire, it is important to remain alert at all times and follow preventive measures to avoid the chances of fire. Fire safety awareness includes assessing the possible risks that can cause a fire hazard and taking appropriate steps to prevent and minimize the damage caused due to a fire. Basic fire safety plans might involve installation of fire safety equipment and marking safe exit points in the building

WHAT IS FIRE SAFETY AWARENESS?

Fire safety awareness means Analyzing the possible risks of fire in your vicinity and taking preventive measures to ensure minimum damage and safe exit of all the person exposed to fire. Different fire safety awareness approaches are adopted at different locations. However, the priority of every approach is the safe and successful evacuation of people trapped in a building in case of a fire. A Well planned and practiced fire safety training can prepare you mentally and physically to keep your mind calm during an emergency situation so that you can take the necessary steps to mitigate the damage.

Why is Fire Safety Awareness Important?

Fires can take lives and destroy property. If one has to handle a fire without damage then he/she must be aware at all the times. One of the key strategies while talking about fire safety awareness is identifying the possible fire hazards around you and making sure that a well thought fire safety plan is in motion as soon as a fire breaks out.

Fire Damage Restoration

8/27/2020 (Permalink)

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call the SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo 586-336-7373 which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our specialist will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

The SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call  SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo 586-336-7373 which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our specialist will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Franchise Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

The SERVPRO Of Marine City/ Romeo Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Have Questions about smoke, fire or soot damage? Call SERVPRO Marine City/ Romeo at 586-336-7373 24 hours a day.

Fire Safety

8/25/2020 (Permalink)

While California's wildfires are in the news so now is a good time to review Michigan's Department of Natural Resources fire prevention tips. According to the DNR 9 out of 10 wildfires in Michigan are due to humans. These fires can easily be be prevented by following a few tips:

  • Never leave a fire unattended.Always keep a shovel, metal bucket and water source nearby
  • Build your fire in a fire ring or on mineral soil
  • When finished with your fire, douse it thoroughly with water, stir the ashes and douse again. Repeat until cool.
  • Soak all used fireworks in water before discarding.
  • Do not burn on windy days or during periods of dry weather

For further tips visit Michigan Department of Natural Resources Website. The DNR website includes fun and educational material for parents and kids regarding fire safety.

Fire Restoration

7/17/2020 (Permalink)

Fire is a devastating catastrophe!

Structures that have been burned often require complete removal. If all or part of your property has been burned or scorched including wood, drywall, furniture, or fixtures, these items are not likely to be recovered. But when property is not directly involved in the fire it may only sustain smoke and soot damage. When this happens contents could be professionally cleaned.

Do not clean or wipe walls, ceilings or other absorbent surfaces, as this could cause additional damage. SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo will help you save your contents. We have trained technicians who will clean and restore your business or home to working condition in a timely manner.

Call SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo at (586)-336-7373 we are here to help 24/7.

Fire Safety in the Kitchen

7/8/2020 (Permalink)

What you should know about home cooking safety
  • Be on alert! If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.
  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, boiling, or broiling food.
  • If you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, remain in the kitchen while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.
  • Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — away from your stovetop.
If you have a cooking fire
  • Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire.
  • Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number after you leave.
  • If you try to fight the fire, be sure others are getting out and you have a clear way out.
  • Keep a lid nearby when you’re cooking to smother small grease fires. Smother the fire by sliding the lid over the pan and turn off the stovetop. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled.
  • For an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed.

Source:https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/Fire-causes-and-risks/Top-fire-causes/Cooking

Top Causes of a Fire

5/31/2020 (Permalink)

While stuck in Quarantine it's important to know what you can do to  prevent a fire in your house. 
These are some of the top[ causes of in home fires

  • Be alert; if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the oven or stovetop
  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, boiling or broiling food
  • When simmering, baking or roasting, check the food regularly, remain in the kitchen while cooking and use a timer
  • Keep anything that can catch fire away from your stovetop

Heating is the second leading cause of home fires. Follow these tips from the American Red Cross:

  • Keep all flammables, like paper, clothing, bedding, drapes or rugs, at least 3 feet from a space heater, stove or fireplace
  • Never leave portable heaters and fireplaces unattended; turn off heaters and make sure fireplace embers are extinguished before leaving the room
  • If you must use a space heater, place it on a level, nonflammable surface, like ceramic tile, not on a rug or carpet
  • Keep children and pets away from space heaters
  • When buying a space heater, look for models that shut off automatically if the heater falls over

In addition to cooking, other top causes of fire include smoking, electrical problems and candles. To minimize risks:

  • Institute a “no smoking” policy in the house
  • Check all cords and replace any that are frayed or have bare wires
  • Switch to flameless candles
  • Keep matches and lighters high and out of children’s reach in a locked cabinet
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
  • Replace batteries annually, and change the batteries in your carbon monoxide detectorat the same time
  • Replace smoke alarms that are 10 or more years old

 https://www.nsc.org/home-safety/safety-topics/emergency-preparedness/fire

Smoke and soot damage

9/6/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo Truck at a fire job SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo

After the fire is out and all the rescue workers are gone. Getting your property back to preloss condition as fast as you can will be your next concern.

SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo is here to help. We respond within one hour of your call and start the mitigation services approximately four hour’s after notification of the loss. Our services help to ensure your belongings and property are restored to preloss condition when possible.

SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo responded to a customer in Richmond, Michigan removed contents and started the cleaning process from smoke damage in the customer’s barn. Our technicians cleaned and painted his walls and floors. The contents with soot and smoke damage were cleaned and restored using our state-of-the-art techniques.  The owner appreciated our swift response to his loss and was grateful we could restore his building and contents.

Call SERVPRO of Marine City / Romeo at 

(586)336-7373!

Fire - General grilling tips

8/27/2019 (Permalink)

A Reminder From:  SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo

(586)336 7373 

https://www.SERVPROmarinecityromeo.com

 Safety Tips:  BBQ- Propane and charcoal BBQ grills.  (by: NFPA)

1. The grill should be placed well away form the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.

2. Keep children and pets away from the grill area.

3. Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill

4.  Never leave your grill unattended (by: NFPA)

Stop! Bad Idea!  When burning the grease off your barbecue indoors (even in a large building) then leaving it unattended just for a few minutes can cause a terrible fire.  You may think you'll be right back.  Oops, we all can forget.

House Fires

8/23/2019 (Permalink)

Soot covered ceiling in customers home after a house fire. Smoke Damage

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo responded to a home fire in Richmond, MI.  Our certified technicians responded immediately and began  clean up. The home was accessed for damage and proceeded with the process of clean up and restoration began.  The structure was restored and contents were cleaned boxed and returned in a timely manner. The home owners was completely satisfied with all phases 

Prevention is the first step in all house fires. Fire is disastrous and the first 48 hours after fire damage is very important to restoring your property and personal belongings.

Call SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo - Emergency Service 24/7.  We are here to help you in your time of need and regain control of your life quickly. 

https://www.SERVPROmarinecityromeo.com

Fire Preparedness

7/16/2019 (Permalink)

PLAN AND GET READY

A Fire in a home or business is one of the most common disasters. Fires cause more deaths than any other type of disaster. But fire doesn't have to be deadly if you have early warning from a smoke detector and everyone in your family knows how to escape calmly. Please be serious about the responsibility for planning for and practicing what to do in case of a fire.  Be prepared by having various household members do each of the items on the checklist below. Then get together to discuss and finalize your personalized Fire Plan.  Install smoke detectors outside each sleeping area and on each additional level of your residence. Keep new batteries on hand.

New smoke detectors installed

Batteries purchased

Test smoke detectors once a month

Start a chart and sign it after each round of tests.

Family member/ Employee checks smoke detectors.

Look at the fire extinguisher you have to ensure it is properly charged. Use the gauge or test button to check proper pressure. If the unit is low on pressure, damaged, or corroded replace it or have it professionally serviced.

Get training from the fire department in how to use the fire extinguisher.

Family member/Employee examines extinguisher.

F
amily member/Employee have been trained to use the extinguisher.

Draw a floor plan of your home; mark two fire escape routes for each room.

Pick a safe outside place to meet after escaping from a fire.

Find a Meeting place 

Practice a low-crawl escape from your bedroom. Try it with your eyes closed to see how well you could do in thick smoke.

MAKE YOUR HOME FIRE SAFE

  • Smoke detectors save lives. Install a battery-powered smoke detector outside each sleeping area and on each additional level of your home.
  • Use the test button to check each smoke detector once a month. When necessary, replace batteries immediately. Replace batteries at least once a year.
  • Have a working fire extinguisher in the kitchen. Get training from the fire department in how to use it. Also include in the kit written instructions on how to turn off utilities at your house.
  • Conduct periodic fire drills, so everyone remembers what to do when there is a fire.

PLAN YOUR ESCAPE ROUTES

  • Determine at least two ways to escape from every room of your home. If you must use an escape ladder, be sure everyone knows how to use it.
  • Select a location outside your home where everyone would meet after escaping.
  • Practice your escape plan at least twice a year. Once you are out, stay out!

ESCAPE SAFELY

  • If you see smoke in your first escape route, use your second way out.
  • If you must exit through smoke, crawl low under the smoke to escape.
  • If you are escaping through a closed door, feel the door before opening it. If it is hot, use your second way out.
  • If smoke, heat, or flames block your exit routes, stay in the room with the door closed. Signal for help using a bright-colored cloth at the widow.
  •  If there is a telephone in the room, call the fire department and tell them where you are

Source: Quake Kare ER

Fact Vs Fiction: Fire Sprinkler Systems

7/2/2019 (Permalink)

Fire safety in your business is imperative. One of the best and tried and true ways of putting small fires out is the installation of a sprinkler system However, many myths about them still exist. 

This was taken from an article on Tufts public and Environmental safety

"Myth:“Water damage from a sprinkler system will be more extensive than fire damage.”

Fact:Water damage from a building sprinkler system will be much less severe than the damage caused by water from fire fighting hose lines or smoke and fire damage if the fire is allowed to spread. Quick response sprinklers release 8-24 gallons of water per minute compared to 80-125 gallons per minute discharged by a fire hose.

Myth:“When a fire occurs, every sprinkler head goes off.”

Fact:Sprinkler heads are individually activated by fire temperatures in excess of 155°. Residential fires are usually controlled with one sprinkler head. 90% of all fires are controlled with six or fewer heads and a study conducted during 80 years of automatic sprinkler use found that 82% of the fires that have occurred were controlled by two or fewer sprinkler heads.

Myth:“A smoke detector provides enough protection.”

Fact:Smoke detectors save lives by providing an early warning to a smoke or fire incident, but can do nothing to extinguish a growing fire or protect those physically unable to escape on their own, such as the elderly or small children. Too often, battery operated smoke detectors fail to function because the batteries are dead or have been removed. As the percent of homes in America that were “protected” with smoke detectors increased from zero to more than 70%, the number of fire deaths in homes did not significantly decrease.

Myth:“Sprinklers are designed to protect property, but are not effective for life safety.”

Fact:Sprinklers provide a high level of life safety. Statistics reveal that there has never been any multiple loss of life in a fully sprinklered building. Property losses are 85% less in residences with fire sprinklers compared to those without sprinklers. The combination of automatic sprinklers and early warning systems in all buildings could reduce overall injuries, loss of life and property damage by at least 50%."

Fourth of July Fireworks safety

6/15/2019 (Permalink)

The forth of July is upon us and with it comes some fun family festivities including barbecues, camping, bonfires and of course fireworks displays galore. Should you elect to light them off from the comfort of your own home here are some tips from https://www.allprodad.com/10-fireworks-safety-tips/

  1. Fireworks packaged in brown paper are made for professional displays – avoid buying.
  2. Always have an adult supervise fireworks activities, especially with sparklers.
  3. Back up to a safe distance immediately after lighting fireworks.
  4. Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  5. Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire and to douse used fireworks before discarding in trash.
  6. Never allow young children to play or ignite fireworks.
  7. Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
  8. Never try to re-light or pickup fireworks that have not ignited fully.
  9. Never place a part of your body directly over a firework device when lighting.
  10. Make sure fireworks are legal in your area before buying or using them.

As always if an unforeseen accidents occur SERVPRO is always ready to handle all of your Fire remediation needs. 

Fire Safety

8/24/2018 (Permalink)

Create a fire safety plan now

 
In the event that you or someone you know has a fire. SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is available to help you. We know how important it is to act quickly, so the sooner you call us at (586) 336-7373, the sooner we can stop any further damage.

Creating a plan ahead of time can you save you time and money in the future. Fires in your home or business are some of the most dangerous and traumatic events that can occur. Although we do not like to think about it, they are a possibility, so everyone should know ahead of time.

Steps to be taken:
1. Have An Escape Plan 
Make an escape plan and practice it several times per year with your family. Make sure your family members know not to put their lives in danger to save possessions. Always take the route that gets you outside the fastest. If you must exit through smoke, know to drop down under it and try to cover your mouth to keep from breathing smoke. If a door is hot to the touch, do not open it or go through it. 
 
2. Rope Ladders 
If you live in a two-story home, every bedroom should have a rope ladder which is readily available so family members can climb down outside instead of being trapped. A meeting spot outside your home needs to be designated, and ensure you take attendance, so you know who is out safely. 
 
3. Stop, Drop, Roll 
Everyone should know how to do this if fire catches on your clothes. Drop to the ground right away, cross your hands over your chest, and roll forward and back until you smother the flames completely. Cool the area that is burned with water and call for medical attention right away for serious burns. 
 
4. Fire Extinguishers 
Places such as your workshop, fireplace, and kitchen should have fire extinguishers nearby. Every family member should know how to use it as well. Extinguishers need to be regularly recharged, inspected or replaced as necessary. 
 
5. Stove Fires 
A small fire in your kitchen should be able to be handled by all. Suffocate the fire by putting a lid on the pan, turning the stove off and letting the pan sit unmoved until the flames are smothered. Extinguish small grease fires by putting baking soda on them, but do not ever use water. 
 

Recovering From Smoke Damage

8/20/2018 (Permalink)

Do you have smoke damage? SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is here to help you.

When a fire occurs we want to help you restore your home and belongings preloss condition. Even after the initial clean up has been completed, the smell of the fire can linger. SERVPRO's training, knowledge and equipment restore smoke damaged properties. 
 
Our technicians are trained to deal with lingering fire odors swiftly and efficiently. Our professionally trained and IICRC certified teams have the skill and equipment needed to deodorize your house and leave it smelling fresh once more –"Like it never even happened."

The first step is to tackle the smell at its source. We thoroughly vent the problem area, and clean surfaces to help scrub away the source of the smell. For some spaces, an odor counteractant can be used to clean away those odors. Placement of an activated charcoal unit overnight is another option to absorb smells. If the home is vacant of the residents, live plants, and pets, we can set up ozone machines which chemically capture smoke particulates in the air. 
 
If cleaning and ventilation do not succeed in tackling stubborn smoke smells after a fire, our technicians are equipped with thermal fog equipment. Thermal fogging equipment mimics the heat and pressure of the fire in a safe manner. 
 
Let SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo remove lingering smoke odors after a fire. Call us at (586) 336-7373 today for assistance.

Home Materials and Fire Risk

8/20/2018 (Permalink)

Modern building materials work wonders for homeowners — they make homes easier and cheaper to build, they’re generally stronger and they take less time to construct.

But this convenience comes at a cost that homeowners need to be aware of: Increased fire devastation.

According to research by Underwriters Laboratories, a nationally recognized safety testing company based in Illinois, the combination of home-building materials, synthetic materials used in furniture and open home designs cause fires in modern-day homes to burn much faster than in older homes.

“When smoke alarms first became common in homes 35 years ago, after they went off, you had on average about 17 minutes to get out of your house until the room turned to flashover,” he says. “Today, that 17 minutes is down to 3 or 4 minutes.”

In the event of a fire or smoke damage SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is always here to help.

Retrieved from Angieslist.com

Upcoming Fire Prevention Week

8/8/2018 (Permalink)

2018 Campaign: October 7-13

The purpose of Fire Prevention Week "FPW" is to bring awareness to the risk of death in case of a fire and provide educational resources to people of all ages, races, and socioeconomic status in order to keep everyone safe.

This year’s FPW campaign, “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere,” works to educate people about three basic but essential steps to take to reduce the likelihood of having a fire and how to escape safely in the event of one.

Since 1922, the NFPA has sponsored the public observance of Fire Prevention Week. In 1925, President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed Fire Prevention Week a national observance, making it the longest-running public health observance in our country. Fire Prevention Week is observed each year during the week of October 9th in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871, and caused devastating damage. 

By:National Fire Protection Association. © National Fire Protection Association 2018.

In a fire, mere seconds can mean the difference between a safe escape and a tragedy. Fire safety education isn’t just for school children. Teenagers, adults, and the elderly are also at risk in fires, making it important for every member of the community to take some time every October during Fire Prevention Week to make sure they understand how to stay safe in case of a fire.

What is Fire Damage?

8/3/2018 (Permalink)

Definition - What does Fire Damage mean?

Fire damage refers to the physical damage to a property as a result of burning. This damage may either be directly caused by the flames or could occur due to smoke and other corrosive substances emitted by the fire.

In terms of insurance, fire damage is one of the types of coverage offered in property insurance.

  

Insuranceopedia explains Fire Damage

The six types of fire damage are as follows:

  • Class A: fire that involves flammable solids, such as paper, cloth, wood, and plastics.
  • Class B: fire that involves flammable liquids or solids that can turn into liquids.
  • Class C: fire that involves flammable gasses, such as propane, hydrogen, natural gas, and butane.
  • Class D: fire that involves combustible metals, including sodium, magnesium, and potassium.
  • Class E: fire that involves factors in Class A and B as well as electrical elements.
  • Class F: relatively hotter and more destructive fire that involves cooking oils and fats.

Furthermore, many insurance companies divide fire damage into two categories: primary and secondary. The former refers to damage caused by the flames, while the latter refers to damage caused by smoke or other substances from the fire.

How to Survive a Fire

7/10/2018 (Permalink)

“The following article was contributed by James Smith, an avid prepper with a passion for self-protection at all levels”

The hazards of a fire are deadly and may even prove fatal if proper precautions are not taken. Thousands of Americans lost their lives to such life-haunting misfortunes that can strike your house anytime due to minor malfunctioning, taking you by surprise and robbing you of your most prized possessions.

However, nothing is more precious than human life. These incidents usually happen uninformed and the best way is to be prepared beforehand.

Planning for a fire

A sensible family would make it a point to keep their family members aware and educated about the possibilities of an accidental fire and the logical steps to follow. The key to surviving in such situations is not to panic and think of practical solutions rather than creating havoc.

Having you and your family learn certain skills such as those of handling, first aid kits and basic medical knowledge can save a life.

  • Devise an escape plan in advance and clearly identify the escape routes known to all family members, which they can opt for, in times of emergency.
  • Upper floor houses should preferably have hook-on escape rope ladders.
  • Allocate responsibilities to individual adults, so that the situation can be easily taken control of, in case of any such mishap, and safety of all the kids should be the top most priority.
  • Just like schools carry out safety-drills to educate the children about the plan-of-action in case of emergency, you can train your children to act quickly and get out of the building without a second thought. The disabled, if any, need to be taken care of too. These drills will not only help in times of fire, but also during natural catastrophes.
  • Act smart and quick and keep the 911 emergency numbers in hand. Furthermore, every child should know their home address and the way to complain in case there is a fire in the house.
  • Keeping an emergency first aid kit at home can do no harm. In fact, this compact kit may prove helpful in situations which are un-called for. This may even include fire-extinguishers near the kitchen and furnaces to put off small fires and not letting them aggravate into bigger ones.

React before it’s too late

Timing is of utmost importance when it comes to handling a fire. Fire spreads at an alarming rate and can make concrete things crumble to ashes in seconds. Their existence can be demolished in no time. Do not panic, just act.

  • The minute your smoke detector or fire alarm goes off and your senses detect fire try to exit the building. Remember, you may have just a few seconds to escape the clutches of the blazing fire, so without further ado escape and call out loud for help.

Seek refuge through doors during fires

  • In such situations, wooden doors offer great protection from heat and smoke and stop the fire from spreading. It is best to hide behind doors when escaping from room to room, closing each door behind you.
  • Before opening each door make sure, that there is no fire on the other side of the room. If you feel heat or smoke exuding through the cracks, or if the knob or door feels hot to touch, then do not open the door. It’s always advisable to open the door carefully, lest you are inviting more danger. If in case you encounter fire when you open the door immediately shut it back.
  • If you detect or suspect fire or smoke on the other side, then your next option is to escape through windows. For that too, ensure that the door is shut otherwise the draft from the windows can aggravate the fire in the blink of an eye.

Prevent yourself from inhaling toxic fumes

Try to keep yourself safe from breathing in smoke, if you can’t keep it off completely you can at least try to limit the exposure. You can achieve this by getting low to the floor and crouching on your hands and knees while escaping. Furthermore, placing a shirt or wet rag over your face while escaping through a fume-filled room can filter out the intoxicating products of combustion and help you escape with minimum injuries.

Clothes are highly likely to catch fire

Stay away from curtains, table cloths and bed sheets as they catch fire very easily. This gives you the obvious warning that if your clothes catch fire, stops, drop and roll. This is because rolling smothers the fire and doesn’t let it spread wildly. Keep your face covered with your hands to offer maximum protection. Fire can be lethal and destroy your facial features. Let not such a misery befall you and cause permanent damage.

You don’t necessarily have to be heroic to escape from the window

If you don’t live on the upper floors of a building and you feel you have enough stamina to escape through the window, go ahead and give it a try. Usually you can escape from a two-storey building without much hassle as it is safe and if it makes you escape a fire, then it’s worth the risk. For obvious reasons you need to have an escape ladder. The next step would be to find a ledge. Next, you can get onto it facing the building. It is a rule of thumb to always face the building structure when trying to escape from a window on an upper floor.

Do you feel trapped?

Do not panic if you feel encompassed by smoke from all four sides and are unable to escape the vicinity of your home or your room for that matter. Keep your calm and ensure your safety by keeping off the smoke from all possible miniature holes, cracks or vents. Cover them with cloth or tape to ward off the smoke and do not let it reach you for as long as you can.

Ah! Out into the open air

If you manage to escape the fire successfully, as soon as you come out contact emergency services. Make sure all your family members are out and safe too. Never re-enter a building on fire, in fact call 911 to come to your rescue.

Always remember, a house on fire is a combination of other hazardous factors posing a potential threat- the intoxicating fumes and smoke, the sweltering flames and a possible eerie blackout. It is an absolute necessity to be prepared before hand and act on quick impulse if a fire occurs.

Ref: Survivalist Prepper

Steps to Fire Restoration

8/24/2017 (Permalink)

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call the SERVPRO National Call Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day. Our representative will ask a series of questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us dispatch the nearest SERVPRO Franchise Professional with the appropriate equipment and resources.

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

Our Professionals will carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action.

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, the SERVPRO Franchise Professional can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs.

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. They will then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process.

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

The SERVPRO Franchise Professionals use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces.

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

They will clean all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. They use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. They’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

For your Fire Restoration needs call SERVPRO of Marine City Romeo at (586)-336-7373

Why SERVPRO is the best for your Fire restoration

8/16/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo 

(586)-336-7373

There are so many reasons why you should choose SERVPRO for all of your fire and smoke Restoration needs 

  1. Pretesting: SERVPRO Franchise Professionals tart the cleanup and restoration process by pretesting to determine which process to utilize and allow you to preview the results. So you get the most desirable results in the most efficient way possible. 
  2. Contents Claim Inventory Service: Utilizing contents claim (CCIS) technology, SERVPRO Franchise Professionals can generate comprehensive room-by-room inventories. Contents are categorized as salvageable, non-salvageable and questionable- allowing for easier contents settlement. 
  3. Cleaning and Restoration: All restorable structure and contents will be professionally cleaned and deodorized to preloss condition in most cases. This service condition in most cases. This service includes walls, ceilings, floors, area rugs, furniture, draperies and upholstery electronics, art, clothing,  bric-a-brac  and more. 

Fire and Smoke Damage Tips

8/16/2017 (Permalink)

Set up the largest fan you can get, outside the front of your apartment door facing inwards. Turn it on high and blow fresh air in the house. As the smoke rose, it filled in all the little spaces in your apartment and you need to flush it out. Close all the other doors and windows and open one window for exhaust. Secluded rooms might need a second fan pushing fresh air in from another opening.

Remove all the curtains and window treatments from the windows. They will need to be washed or dry cleaned. At the very least, hang them outside to air out in the fresh air to remove some of the smoke particles from the fibers. Rinse down any mini blinds. Any cloth will need to be cleaned or aired out.

Wash down all the solid surfaces with a spray solution of one gallon of water, one teaspoon of dish soap or shampoo and a quarter cup of white vinegar. Use a rag and rinse it often in fresh water. Wipe window sills, baseboards, tables, chairs, shelves, wood or tile floors where the smoke particles might have settled. Very sooty smoke might have left a residue on walls and ceilings that will need to be cleaned.

Vacuum the carpets with a machine that contains a high-efficiency, filter to keep the smoke particles from blowing right back in the room. Use an attachment to vacuum couches and chairs and any exposed cushions. Go over the surfaces to remove as much soil as possible. If the smoke particles persist in the furniture, you might invest in upholstery cleaner to loosen the soil and then vacuum again.

Wash any and all window screens where the smoke exited the apartment. Place them in a tub or shower and use dish soap or shampoo to clean the mesh and then rinse with cool water. If you used an exhaust fan, wash out the filter in the same way. Change the air conditioner filter if it was in use at the time of the fire.

Wash down the front of your kitchen cabinets, especially if it was a kitchen fire that caused the smoke. Wipe all horizontal surfaces down with your cleaning solution.

Mop all the floors that are not carpeted. Several cleanings will be necessary. Dip your mop in the soapy solution, wash the floor and then rinse the mop in the sink under fresh running water. Otherwise, the smoke particles will just float around in your mop bucket and end up back on the floor.

St Clair County Fire Safety Tips

8/7/2017 (Permalink)

According to St Clair County Emergency Management Department every year 5,500 Americans die in fires and more than 30,000 are injured. Most fire deaths occur in the home and many can be prevented. Your local fire departments work to keep citizens informed and practiced in fire safety training. To protect yourself and your family it is important to understand the basic characteristics of fire.

  • Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or make a phone call.
  • In two minutes a fire can become life threatening. In five minutes a house can be engulfed in flames.
  • Fire's heat and smoke are more dangerous than the flames. Inhaling the super-hot air can sear your lungs.
  • Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy.
  • Request an inspection of your home or business by your local fire department.
  • Install smoke detectors. Place detectors on the ceiling or high on the wall of every level of your house, outside bedrooms, at the top of open stairways, at the bottom of enclosed stairs, and near (but not in) the kitchen.
  • Clean and test smoke detectors once a month and replace batteries at least twice a year.
  • Install a fire extinguisher in your home and teach family members how to use it.
  • Plan two escape routes from every room in your home or office. Choose a place outside for everyone to meet after escaping from a fire.
  • Have a practice fire drill at least once a year; teach children how to report a fire, and when to use 911.
  • Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken the household in case of fire. Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer) when escaping from a fire.
  • Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
  • Make sure windows are not nailed or painted shut.
  • Safeguard your home against fires by keeping storage areas clean, check wiring and outlets, and use caution with flammable liquids and materials.

https://www.stclaircounty.org/Offices/emerg_mngmt/72hours.aspx

Fire and Smoke Damage Tips

8/2/2017 (Permalink)

Fire and Smoke damage can be devastating to you and your home or business. It disrupts your life and you can feel out of control. SERVPRO of Marine City/ Romeo has plenty of experience in handling Fire disasters of all sizes. We have plenty of tips to ensure that you are in control of the situation before we arrive to asses the damage and throughout the restoration process. 

DO:

  • Limit the movement of people in the building to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets. 
  • Keep hands clean. Sooty hands can further soil walls, upholstery and woodwork. 
  • Place dry colorfast towels on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off empty freezer and refrigerator completely and prop doors open to help prevent odors.
  • Wipe soot from chrome on kitchen and bathroom faucets, trim and appliances. Then protect with a light coating of lubricant
  • Pour RV antifreeze into sinks, toilet bowls, holding tanks and tubs if heat is off during freezing system.
  • Gently wash both sides of leaves on indoor plants.  
  • Change HVAC filter, but leave system off until checked by a trained professional. 
  • Tape double layers of cheese cloth over air registers to stop particles of soot from getting in or out of the HVAC system 

DONT'S 

  • Attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces without first contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional 
  • Attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture. 
  • Attempt to clean any electrical appliances that may have been close to heat, fire or water without first consulting your authorized repair service person.
  • Consume any canned or packaged foods or beverages as they may have been contaminated.
  • Turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. Wiring may be wet or damaged  and cause electrical shock. 
  • Send Garments to the dry cleaners. Improper cleaning can set the smoke odor. 

What to do if a fire occurs in your St Clair County home

6/13/2017 (Permalink)

Emergency Plan for Fire & Smoke 

Fires in the home are some of the most dangerous events that can occur. Although we do not like to think about it, they are a possibility, so all family members in your household should know ahead of time what to do in case you experience such an unfortunate event.


1. Have An Escape Plan 
You should first ensure that your entire family knows what to do in case of a fire in your home. Make an escape plan and practice it several times per year with your family. Make sure your family members know not to put their lives in danger to save possessions. Always take the route that gets you outside the fastest. If you must exit through smoke, know to drop down under it and try to cover your mouth to keep from breathing smoke. If a door is hot to the touch, do not open it or go through it. 
 
2. Rope Ladders 
If you live in a two-story home, every bedroom should have a rope ladder which is readily available so family members can climb down outside instead of being trapped. A meeting spot outside your home needs to be designated, and ensure you take attendance, so you know who is out safely. This will keep people from endangering themselves by going back in and looking for someone who is already out. If someone is missing, make sure to alert the firefighters – do not ever reenter the home yourself. 
 
3. Stop, Drop, Roll 
Everyone should know how to do this if fire catches on your clothes. Drop to the ground right away, cross your hands over your chest, and roll forward and back until you smother the flames completely. Cool the area that is burned with water and call for medical attention right away for serious burns. 
 
4. Fire Extinguishers 
Places such as your workshop, fireplace, and kitchen should have fire extinguishers nearby. Every family member should know how to use it as well. Extinguishers need to be regularly recharged, inspected or replaced as necessary. 
 
5. Stove Fires 
A small fire in your kitchen should be able to be handled by all. Suffocate the fire by putting a lid on the pan, turning the stove off and letting the pan sit unmoved until the flames are smothered. Extinguish small grease fires by putting baking soda on them, but do not ever use water. 
 
Call SERVPRO as soon as any fire is out so that they can clean up damages and prevent any further damage from happening. 
 
SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo is available to help you clean up fire damage at any time. We know how important it is to act quickly, so the sooner you call us at (586) 336-7373, the sooner we can stop further damage from soot and smoke.

Removing Lingering Odors After Fire Damage To Your St Clair County MI Home

6/5/2017 (Permalink)

Lingering odors from a fire can be devastating. Contact the Professionals at SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo to restore your home or business.

SERVPRO's Training, Knowledge and Equipment Restore Smoke Damaged Properties

When a fire occurs, the most vital thing is to get it under control. After this crucial factor has been achieved, the next stage is to restore your home and belongings to their pre-fire condition. However, even after the initial clean up has been completed, the smell of the fire can linger. Many homeowners find that even after all charred and damaged items are removed, and surfaces are thoroughly cleaned there is still a smoky smell in the air.
 
If you can still smell a burned or charred scent after fire damage to your home, further work may be needed to deodorize your house. Our technicians are trained to deal with lingering fire odors swiftly and efficiently. Our professionally trained and certified IICRC teams have the skill and equipment needed to deodorize your house and leave it smelling fresh once more –"Like it never even happened."
 
We train our IICRC certified technicians to assess what is causing lingering odors after a fire. Confined areas, attics, rafters, and the insulation in your home are all especially susceptible to odor entrapment after a fire has occurred. Each area needs to be treated carefully to ensure the odor is removed.
 
We arrive at your home equipped with deodorizing equipment. The first step is to assess what is causing the smell to linger. The next step is to tackle the smell at its source. We thoroughly vent the problem area, and clean surfaces to help scrub away the source of the smell. For some spaces, an odor counteractant can be used to clean away those odors. In some cases, placement of an activated charcoal unit overnight can absorb the smell. IF the home is vacant of the residents, live plants, and pets, we can set up ozone machines which chemically capture smoke particulates in the air. Hydroxyl generators are also very useful in purging the ambient air of unwanted particles, thus mitigating, and finally, eliminating the smoke odors.
 
If cleaning and ventilation do not succeed in tackling stubborn smoke smells after a fire, our technicians are equipped with thermal fog equipment. Thermal fogging equipment mimics the heat and pressure of the fire in a safe manner. Materials that picked up the smell of smoke from the fire now pick up the deodorization droplets from thermal fogging in the same manner. 
 
Let SERVPRO of Marine City/Romeo remove lingering smoke odors after a fire. Call us at (586) 336-7373 today for assistance.